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[basketball-coaching] Re: Competitive Dribbling Drills

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  • Chad S Dotson
    ... Try Dribble Tag. Played just like tag, but everyone must dribble the entire time. Gather all your guards (or everyone) one one half-court, give them
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 12, 1999
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      >From: "Brian or Emma Terry" <terry@...>
      >
      >Does anyone have any competitive dribbling drills
      >that I could do in practice. I will take anything
      >as long as it will help up us handle the ball better

      Try "Dribble Tag." Played just like tag, but everyone must dribble the
      entire time. Gather all your guards (or everyone) one one half-court,
      give them each a ball, and let them go at it for a pre-determined amount
      of time. Name someone "It" and they have to tag someone. They will
      have fun and it really helps ballhandling.

      csd

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    • InHouseSpy@aol.com
      A good dribbling drill we like to use is.....All players have their own ball and stand within the 3 point line. The players dribble and try to knock the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 12, 1999
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        A good dribbling drill we like to use is.....All players have their own ball
        and stand within the 3 point line. The players dribble and try to knock the
        opponents ball outside the lines (baseline, 3pt line), while protecting their
        basketball. When the ball crosses the line, that player does sprints or some
        other type of penalty (coaches decision). The drill continues until you have
        one winner. Once the group starts to get smaller, you can decrease their room
        to maneuver by making the key (free throw lane) as the boundaries.

        Coach Ray (Franklin H.S. Livonia, MI)

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      • Brian or Emma Terry
        Does anyone have any competitive dribbling drills that I could do in practice. I will take anything as long as it will help up us handle the ball better
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 12, 1999
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          Does anyone have any competitive dribbling drills
          that I could do in practice. I will take anything
          as long as it will help up us handle the ball better

          Thanks.
          Brian Terry
          terry@...


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        • Ernest Wallengren
          Coach, I m new to the list and this is my first post, but I ve got to start somewhere! I coach a pair of club teams, 13 and 14 years old. I practice both
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 11, 1999
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            Coach,

            I'm new to the list and this is my first post, but I've got to start
            somewhere!

            I coach a pair of club teams, 13 and 14 years old. I practice both
            teams at the same time (15 boys in all; three of the most talented
            younger ones also play on the older squad). We have two to three
            practices a week at two hours apiece.

            We start each practice with warm-ups and stretches, then spend about
            ten minutes doing really arduous conditioning drills -- suicides,
            plyometrics, etc. We go from there into fifteen minutes of fast
            break drills.

            The next hour varies from practice to practice, but is always weighted
            toward defense. One night we'll spend forty minutes on our pressure
            man-to-man defense and twenty minutes on our half court offense, another
            night we'll concentrate on our press and our press break, etc. During
            the hour, we run lots of breakdown drills to help develop good habits.
            However, I like to give the team an overview of what we're trying to
            accomplish beforehand so that the drills have some significance.

            We end every practice with a scrimmage. If we didn't, I'd have a mutiny
            on my hands! But we have an automatic substitution rule in the scrimmage,
            based on what we've worked on in practice. If the focus has been on boxing
            out, the defender who gives up an offensive rebound sits down immediately --
            whether he's been in for fifteen minutes or fifteen seconds. It's a
            great way to review the night's work! (Turnovers also earn you a seat
            on the bench during scrimmage.)

            By the way, I've enjoyed the debate on the list about man-to-man versus zone
            defenses. I think zones are great, but they should never be allowed in
            developmental leagues. I inherit most of my players from local park and rec
            teams, where zones are the order of the day. They can dribble between their
            legs and shoot threes until the cows come home, but some of them don't have
            a clue how to play defense.

            Coach Ernie

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Brian or Emma Terry [mailto:terry@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 1999 9:58 PM
            To: basketball-coaching@egroups.com
            Subject: [basketball-coaching] practice time


            How long do you practice in a normal practice?

            Do you scrimmage full court in all practices?

            How much time do you spend on man defense drills each practice?

            Is it better to teach offense as a whole or in parts then put the parts
            together?

            Just wanting to know the different approaches to you practices.

            Coach Terry


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          • mlosc@tin.it
            wrote: Original Article: http://www.egroups.com/list/basketball-coaching/?start=160 ... Two questions about first
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 12, 1999
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              <000501be5608$a7924260$640000c-@home-office> wrote:
              Original Article: http://www.egroups.com/list/basketball-coaching/?start=160
              > Coach,
              >
              > I'm new to the list and this is my first post, but I've got to start
              > somewhere!
              >
              > I coach a pair of club teams, 13 and 14 years old. I practice both
              > teams at the same time (15 boys in all; three of the most talented
              > younger ones also play on the older squad). We have two to three
              > practices a week at two hours apiece.
              >
              > We start each practice with warm-ups and stretches, then spend about
              > ten minutes doing really arduous conditioning drills -- suicides,
              > plyometrics, etc. We go from there into fifteen minutes of fast
              > break drills.
              >
              > The next hour varies from practice to practice, but is always weighted
              > toward defense. One night we'll spend forty minutes on our pressure
              > man-to-man defense and twenty minutes on our half court offense, another
              > night we'll concentrate on our press and our press break, etc. During
              > the hour, we run lots of breakdown drills to help develop good habits.
              > However, I like to give the team an overview of what we're trying to
              > accomplish beforehand so that the drills have some significance.
              >
              > We end every practice with a scrimmage. If we didn't, I'd have a mutiny
              > on my hands! But we have an automatic substitution rule in the scrimmage,
              > based on what we've worked on in practice. If the focus has been on boxing
              > out, the defender who gives up an offensive rebound sits down immediately --
              > whether he's been in for fifteen minutes or fifteen seconds. It's a
              > great way to review the night's work! (Turnovers also earn you a seat
              > on the bench during scrimmage.)
              >
              > By the way, I've enjoyed the debate on the list about man-to-man versus zone
              > defenses. I think zones are great, but they should never be allowed in
              > developmental leagues. I inherit most of my players from local park and rec
              > teams, where zones are the order of the day. They can dribble between their
              > legs and shoot threes until the cows come home, but some of them don't have
              > a clue how to play defense.
              >
              > Coach Ernie
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Brian or Emma Terry [mailto:terry@...]
              > Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 1999 9:58 PM
              > To: basketball-coaching@egroups.com
              > Subject: [basketball-coaching] practice time

              > Ernie, I like very much your approach at practices and agree with you about the second part of them.( great idea benching for a miss about the very aim of practice, agree too about making them always having scrimmage).
              Two questions about first part.
              1- I don't like very much having conditioning drills and fast break so close.
              I think is better put them in two separate practices 'cause they develop different muscular and respiratory areas. Conditioning drills cause formation of lactic acid in muscles which can't afford your kids working at maximum in quickness drills.
              Moreover,it'sr always better having quickness drills at beginning.
              Other solution can be divide the two moments giving your player some active rest: work on individual fundamentals, shooting, free throws...
              2- do you never work, during warm-up, developing individual skills?
              Last question. You said that turnover causes benching. I agree but only if they come from no concentration and no intensity.If a kid fails but for too much commitment, let him into game and let him fail again...only with misses and tries on the court he will improve really.
              By your way of writing it seems you have a great passion and guts, straight on your way.
              Teo,from Italy

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