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Moon Walk

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  • hillmans2000
    Acknowledging the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing we d like to share an excerpt from our Gig Notes Ch. 4.
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 20, 2014

      Acknowledging the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing we'd like to share an excerpt from our Gig Notes Ch. 4.
      www.hillmanweb.com/book/gigs/04.html
      *** Where Were You When? . . . The First Men On The Moon
      The July 21 afternoon of our 1969 summer tour saw us glued to our little Sony portable TV. NASA's Apollo 11 space mission had touched down on the moon the day before and now the world was about to witness man's first steps on Earth's only natural satellite.

      Since we weren't scheduled to do a show till that evening we were looking forward to the television coverage of the historic event. Unfortunately, our coach was parked on the North Battleford, Saskatchewan fairgrounds where TV reception was dismal. We moved the set to every part of the vehicle and impatiently adjusted the rabbit ears antenna

      Finally, we picked up images of a ghost in a snowstorm, but the audio came in loud and clear. We settled back to watch this world-shattering event unfold. Seeing US astronaut Neil Armstrong finally utter the words: "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind" as he stepped onto this alien world was incredibly exciting. Considering the hazards of space travel and the state of technology and computers in the '60s, this was a major achievement.

      We put on a well-received show that night, but the wonder of the scientific achievement of safely rocketing through space from the earth to the moon, to make a successful landing on the lunar surface, really eclipsed whatever success we had on stage.
      HILLMAN 50-YEAR MUSICAL ODYSSEY
      www.hillmanweb.com/book

    • sailor.barsoom
      I was there. Oh, not on the Moon of course. Not even in Saskatchewan. I was there, though: in front of the TV, watching with the rest of the world, watching
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 21, 2014
        I was there.

        Oh, not on the Moon of course.  Not even in Saskatchewan.  I was there, though: in front of the TV, watching with the rest of the world, watching as science fiction became historic fact.  My mother had pointed out the Moon to me before, so I knew something, even at that age, of what was going on.
      • Den Valdron
        I remember being seven years old and glued to the TV.  I watched every televised moon launch.  My grandparents had super 8 movies of the old mercury and
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 21, 2014
          I remember being seven years old and glued to the TV.  I watched every televised moon launch.  My grandparents had super 8 movies of the old mercury and Gemini missions.  I was space crazy, read everything, bought cards, the whole nine yards.  I remember the Soviet robot that they landed on the moon, like a bathtub on wheels.  And I remember the old Salyut space station and the tragic deaths of the Russian astronauts.

          Where did it all go?

          Why isn't there a full sized space station with a staff of hundreds.  Colonies on the Moon.  Where's the expedition to Mars, and the expeditions beyond.

          All we got was a handful of robot probes.  They've done amazing things.

          But...  there should have been more.


          From: "sailorbarsoom@... [barsoom]" <barsoom@yahoogroups.com>
          To: barsoom@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 10:52:51 AM
          Subject: [barsoom] Re: Moon Walk

           
          I was there.

          Oh, not on the Moon of course.  Not even in Saskatchewan.  I was there, though: in front of the TV, watching with the rest of the world, watching as science fiction became historic fact.  My mother had pointed out the Moon to me before, so I knew something, even at that age, of what was going on.


        • richard johnson
          WHAT HAPPENED is that they found no oil,m no gold, no uranium, nothing worth going back for. So we quit! In 1865 we went to war with Peru over an island
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 21, 2014
            WHAT HAPPENED is that they found no oil,m no gold, no uranium, nothing worth going back for.  So we quit!
             
            In 1865 we went to war with Peru over an island filled with bat-shit! 
             
            Unless it will make someone rich or the president famous, there is no reason to go back.
            Unmanned probes are cheap.  well, cheaper than a manned mission, which is why the US buys space on Russian rockets and pays the ESA to launch our sattelites.
             
            Had they found berautiful Moon-Women in micro-mini skirts and stilletto heels using Crystal Power as an energy source, we'd have gone back to conquer them in a minute!  but for rocks?
             
            No one will agree to increased taxes to pay to bring rocks back.
            I've seen moon rocks, they are nothing worth going back after.
             
            And knoiwledge does not pay the bills.

            On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 10:12 AM, Den Valdron dgvaldron@... [barsoom] <barsoom@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
             

            I remember being seven years old and glued to the TV.  I watched every televised moon launch.  My grandparents had super 8 movies of the old mercury and Gemini missions.  I was space crazy, read everything, bought cards, the whole nine yards.  I remember the Soviet robot that they landed on the moon, like a bathtub on wheels.  And I remember the old Salyut space station and the tragic deaths of the Russian astronauts.

            Where did it all go?

            Why isn't there a full sized space station with a staff of hundreds.  Colonies on the Moon.  Where's the expedition to Mars, and the expeditions beyond.

            All we got was a handful of robot probes.  They've done amazing things.

            But...  there should have been more.


            From: "sailorbarsoom@... [barsoom]" <barsoom@yahoogroups.com>
            To: barsoom@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 10:52:51 AM
            Subject: [barsoom] Re: Moon Walk

             
            I was there.

            Oh, not on the Moon of course.  Not even in Saskatchewan.  I was there, though: in front of the TV, watching with the rest of the world, watching as science fiction became historic fact.  My mother had pointed out the Moon to me before, so I knew something, even at that age, of what was going on.





            --
            Rick Johnson
            http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
            "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined security will soon find that they have neither."
          • sailor.barsoom
            Between the fact that going to the Moon is very expensive, and the fact that there s nothing in Moon rocks that can t be found in Earth rocks,* there is little
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 22, 2014
              Between the fact that going to the Moon is very expensive, and the fact that there's nothing in Moon rocks that can't be found in Earth rocks,* there is little (financial) value in going to the Moon to bring rocks back to the Earth.

              But while these rocks from our planet's companion have nothing which is not found on Earth,** the fact that they are already out of most of Earth's deep and powerful gravity well makes them a valuable source of materials if one wishes to build things in space.  The energy it takes to launch a hundred tons off of the Earth will launch 2,200 tons from the Moon.  So if one wishes to build something substantial, the Moon starts to look pretty good.

              The problem of course is that we aren't building anything substantial, and this is largely because of the high cost (in money) of launch from Earth.  After all, the equipment for processing Lunar materials and launching them, even at 1/22 the cost (in energy) is equipment which would have to initially be launched from Earth.  The start-up cost is too high.

              Get the launch cost down, and we will have out space stations with hundreds of people, our Lunar colony, and yes, even the manned mission to Mars.  Let the launch costs stay at or near current levels, and we will not have any of that.
            • sailor.barsoom
              * Yes, helium 3, but that is very diffuse and would require sifting through megatons of Lunar regolith to get useful amounts. The other problem is that it s
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 22, 2014
                * Yes, helium 3, but that is very diffuse and would require sifting through megatons of Lunar regolith to get useful amounts.  The other problem is that it's for use in fusion reactors.  Um, what fusion reactors?

                ** see above footnote
              • eric_greystone
                I was there. I was a space-crazy kid. I had all the collectibles, and watched on our little b&w tv that night. If something was happening during school hours,
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 22, 2014
                  I was there. I was a space-crazy kid. I had all the collectibles, and watched on our little b&w tv that night. If something was happening during school hours, each classroom had a tv on a stand playing. What we today would call a "teachable moment."

                  And just for the record, knowledge DOES pay the bills.
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