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Fwd: [LinCarter] "Zanthodon" in Review (From 2006)

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  • Steve
    As promised! Steve S. ... From: Steve To: lincarter ; thb Sent: Mon, Jun 24, 2013 12:23 pm
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 24, 2013
      As promised!

      Steve S.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Steve <steveseg@...>
      To: lincarter <lincarter@yahoogroups.com>; thb <thb@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Mon, Jun 24, 2013 12:23 pm
      Subject: [LinCarter] "Zanthodon" in Review (From 2006)





      "Zanthodon"


      When last I left Zanthodon, at the end of "Journey to the Underground World," Professor
      Potter had fainted by the shore of the Sogar-Jad. He had just witnessed the abduction of
      Darya by Kairadine Redbeard and apparent death of Jorn the Hunter. Eric Carstairs, Fumio,
      One-Eye, Xask and Tharn were off on other separate but related adventures.

      Near the end of "Zanthodon," the second of five books in this latter day series by Carter,
      all parties (and then some) have been happily reunited and it seems a duology is all that is
      need to relate the strange tale of Eric Carstairs. Ah, but we know better!

      During the 185 pages of action, the warriors of Thanadar and Sothar destroy the dwarfish
      Gorpaks and their Lords, the Sluaggh's while both Jorn and Darya escape the pirate vessel
      the "Red Witch."

      A comment or two on both of the above. On page 38, when Potter is confronted by a stray
      Sluaggh, the five foot leech is described thusly: "But the most horrible and repellant
      features about the monstrous leech was not its size or its nature, but the uncanny gleam of
      cold, inhuman intelligence that burned in its eyes." Aside from their hypnotic effect of
      those eyes on its victims, the intelligence aspect is never fully explored. Aside from
      gaining mastery over the Gorpaks and voicing a high-pitched wail when being killed, I saw no
      actual intelligence displayed. Nor was the history of the Gormaks and their relatively high
      level of civilization explained and their docile slaves as well.

      As Kairadine brings the Princees Darya to his cabin aboard the "Red Witch," he prepares to
      rape her. While this act never occurs (thanks to Jorn), Carter does get rather vivid in
      describing the set-up on page 33: "As she panted for breath, her perfect breasts rose and
      fell, their delectable pink tips crisped from the coldness of the sea air on her damp skin.

      The corsair let his eyes travel caressingly down the sleek curve of her arm and shoulder,
      belly and flank and long, slim, tanned thigh." Burroughs would never write such semi-erotic
      stuff (different era, for one thing) and this Stone/Bronze Age Princess is continuously
      being abducted while bathing nude in some secluded pool. Pretty sexy stuff! The illustration
      on page 172 shows Darya's (nude) charms best, far better than Thomas Kidd's cover art.
      Kidd is credited with the Cover Art on the Copyright Page but on the Title Page, he is
      credited as "Ilustrated by." But clearly, the interior illustrator is different and far superior to Thomas Kidd. I just wish I knew who to credit. Perhaps best of the lot is the Frontispiece, showing Tharn as described on pages 14 & 15.

      Going a step further than contemplative rape, Carter describes the actual rape by a Gorpak
      on a pre-teen slave girl on page 79: "For suddenly tossing aside the whip, the bald mane
      tore off his loin-clout and got down on the floor atop the weeping little girl. The child
      made no protest against the assault. The Professor could hear her muffled sobs beneath the
      hog-like gruntings of the creature violating her." As disgusting as this scene is, more so
      was her Father's reaction to it on page 81. At least this rape validates the total destruction of the Gorpaks and Sluagghs, later on.

      While temporarily the captive of One-Eye, Eric is unbound but still doesn't simply run away
      from his much slower Drugar adversary (page 93). Seems sort of silly for Carter not to
      realize this.

      Another similarity between Zanthodon and Pellucidar is when Carter introduces a homing
      instinct (page 102): "The people of Zanthodon have, by and large, something akin to a homing sense: generally, they unerringly head in the direction they want to go..." Seemed almost an add on by Carter.

      A three page character glossary ends "Zanthodon," complementing the animal glossary at the end of the first book.

      Just when things seem all sorted out, along comes Achmed the Moor to kidnap Dayra once more and the Minoan warriors of Zar capture Eric, the Professor and Xask. Everything has gone wrong but at least I know that "Hurok of the Stone Age" will be ready for me!

      Curiously, the Cro-Magnon's slang name for the Neanderthal's, Drugars meaning Ugly Ones, is always capitalized but when they return the favor and call the Cro-Magnons panjani, meaning smooth skins, it is not capitalized. See page 16 for examples of usages.

      The leaders of Sothar, Thanadar and Kor are usually referred to as High Chief or Omad, with
      lesser Chieftains serving beneath (One-Eye, Fumio and Komad for example). But sometimes the term King is used by Carstairs and kingdom for tribe. In Pellucidar, David Innes created
      kingdoms out of the federated tribes and kings of their chiefs. Perhaps Eric does the same
      on his ascension to Emperor of Zanthodon.

      I believe it is the information on page 18 that made me determine that the Sogar-Jad lay to
      the west of the Zanthodon mainland: We were moving steadily west, toward the shores of the
      Sogar-Jad, with the jungle at our left and the plains to our right."

      On page 32, Darya is said to have no knowledge of the Barbary pirates of El-Cazar, as they
      have never raided this far south from their island stronghold to the north. Yet, (page 61),
      Jorn the Hunter knows enough to refer to the corsairs as "The-Men-Who-Ride-Upon-Water" and I believe Tharn did so as well, in the first book

      Steve S. / S.J.S.


      "Zanthodon"


      When last I left Zanthodon, at the end of "Journey to the Underground World," Professor
      Potter had fainted by the shore of the Sogar-Jad. He had just witnessed the abduction of
      Darya by Kairadine Redbeard and apparent death of Jorn the Hunter. Eric Carstairs, Fumio,
      One-Eye, Xask and Tharn were off on other separate but related adventures.

      Near the end of "Zanthodon," the second of five books in this latter day series by Carter,
      all parties (and then some) have been happily reunited and it seems a duology is all that is
      need to relate the strange tale of Eric Carstairs. Ah, but we know better!

      During the 185 pages of action, the warriors of Thanadar and Sothar destroy the dwarfish
      Gorpaks and their Lords, the Sluaggh's while both Jorn and Darya escape the pirate vessel
      the "Red Witch."

      A comment or two on both of the above. On page 38, when Potter is confronted by a stray
      Sluaggh, the five foot leech is described thusly: "But the most horrible and repellant
      features about the monstrous leech was not its size or its nature, but the uncanny gleam of
      cold, inhuman intelligence that burned in its eyes." Aside from their hypnotic effect of
      those eyes on its victims, the intelligence aspect is never fully explored. Aside from
      gaining mastery over the Gorpaks and voicing a high-pitched wail when being killed, I saw no
      actual intelligence displayed. Nor was the history of the Gormaks and their relatively high
      level of civilization explained and their docile slaves as well.

      As Kairadine brings the Princees Darya to his cabin aboard the "Red Witch," he prepares to
      rape her. While this act never occurs (thanks to Jorn), Carter does get rather vivid in
      describing the set-up on page 33: "As she panted for breath, her perfect breasts rose and
      fell, their delectable pink tips crisped from the coldness of the sea air on her damp skin.

      The corsair let his eyes travel caressingly down the sleek curve of her arm and shoulder,
      belly and flank and long, slim, tanned thigh." Burroughs would never write such semi-erotic
      stuff (different era, for one thing) and this Stone/Bronze Age Princess is continuously
      being abducted while bathing nude in some secluded pool. Pretty sexy stuff! The illustration
      on page 172 shows Darya's (nude) charms best, far better than Thomas Kidd's cover art.
      Kidd is credited with the Cover Art on the Copyright Page but on the Title Page, he is
      credited as "Ilustrated by." But clearly, the interior illustrator is different and far superior to Thomas Kidd. I just wish I knew who to credit. Perhaps best of the lot is the Frontispiece, showing Tharn as described on pages 14 & 15.

      Going a step further than contemplative rape, Carter describes the actual rape by a Gorpak
      on a pre-teen slave girl on page 79: "For suddenly tossing aside the whip, the bald mane
      tore off his loin-clout and got down on the floor atop the weeping little girl. The child
      made no protest against the assault. The Professor could hear her muffled sobs beneath the
      hog-like gruntings of the creature violating her." As disgusting as this scene is, more so
      was her Father's reaction to it on page 81. At least this rape validates the total destruction of the Gorpaks and Sluagghs, later on.

      While temporarily the captive of One-Eye, Eric is unbound but still doesn't simply run away
      from his much slower Drugar adversary (page 93). Seems sort of silly for Carter not to
      realize this.

      Another similarity between Zanthodon and Pellucidar is when Carter introduces a homing
      instinct (page 102): "The people of Zanthodon have, by and large, something akin to a homing sense: generally, they unerringly head in the direction they want to go..." Seemed almost an add on by Carter.

      A three page character glossary ends "Zanthodon," complementing the animal glossary at the end of the first book.

      Just when things seem all sorted out, along comes Achmed the Moor to kidnap Dayra once more and the Minoan warriors of Zar capture Eric, the Professor and Xask. Everything has gone wrong but at least I know that "Hurok of the Stone Age" will be ready for me!

      Curiously, the Cro-Magnon's slang name for the Neanderthal's, Drugars meaning Ugly Ones, is always capitalized but when they return the favor and call the Cro-Magnons panjani, meaning smooth skins, it is not capitalized. See page 16 for examples of usages.

      The leaders of Sothar, Thanadar and Kor are usually referred to as High Chief or Omad, with
      lesser Chieftains serving beneath (One-Eye, Fumio and Komad for example). But sometimes the term King is used by Carstairs and kingdom for tribe. In Pellucidar, David Innes created
      kingdoms out of the federated tribes and kings of their chiefs. Perhaps Eric does the same
      on his ascension to Emperor of Zanthodon.

      I believe it is the information on page 18 that made me determine that the Sogar-Jad lay to
      the west of the Zanthodon mainland: We were moving steadily west, toward the shores of the
      Sogar-Jad, with the jungle at our left and the plains to our right."

      On page 32, Darya is said to have no knowledge of the Barbary pirates of El-Cazar, as they
      have never raided this far south from their island stronghold to the north. Yet, (page 61),
      Jorn the Hunter knows enough to refer to the corsairs as "The-Men-Who-Ride-Upon-Water" and I believe Tharn did so as well, in the first book

      Steve S. / S.J.S.







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