Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [barsoom] ERBzine: Carson | Hillman Week | Pellucidar Doorways | Pellucidar fic | Amtor Art | 96 Tarzan Dailies | Foster's Valian 1937 | Mosaics

Expand Messages
  • Den Valdron
    Works for me.  Thanks. ________________________________ From: richard johnson To: barsoom@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, June 10, 2013
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 10, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Works for me.  Thanks.


      ________________________________
      From: richard johnson <rikjohnson39@...>
      To: barsoom@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, June 10, 2013 5:04:39 PM
      Subject: Re: [barsoom] ERBzine: Carson | Hillman Week | Pellucidar Doorways | Pellucidar fic | Amtor Art | 96 Tarzan Dailies | Foster's Valian 1937 | Mosaics


       

      True;
      if Carnosaur was written in 1985 and Jurassic Park in 1990... the park
      was fully functional and the Dinos full-sized and sexually mature
      creatures by 1990. *Female Elephants reach adulthood in 10 years,
      Males in 14. Sauropods???? T-Rex???
      How long would it take the Raptors to reach adulthood and change
      gender and breed?
      How long would it take to process the legal papers to get sole rights
      to those islands?
      How long would it take to actually build the Jurassic Park site?

      I an guessing that they started building the sites by 1985 and
      breeding the dinos long before that, probably in the US then moved
      back to the island after they got title to the islands, smuggling in
      the babiesand pretending that they had been bred there. Then by 1990,
      they were creating them on site.
      The Carnosaur thing may have been a means to make some quick cash AND
      hide it before Hammond spent it all.building his theme park.

      So they may have found the first dinos (or carcass) around 1980,
      Immediatly started research and legal proceedures to the islands then.
      1985 started building the park andlabs on site. Plus some of the
      InGen people were selling fertilized ovum to the other labs to make
      money which they would hide when Hammond's plans became known.
      By 1990, the park was almost ready to open, the dinos were at least 10
      years old and they began to clone them on site by 1990.
      a year or three later, Site-B was abandoned because of the lawsuits
      and the dinos released.
      1995 Lost World was written and within a year or two after, the dinos
      were starving to death.. By 2000, the dinos were extinct again.

      I did note that Carnosaur and the rest had really bad sickly
      dinos.which I forgot to mention. Those were probably early clones
      before they got the techniques worked out. So Ingen was selling
      imperfect eggs with massive genetic problems. Consideringthe trouble
      these caused, imagine what would have happened had Ingen sold 'good'
      ovum?

      Probably to prevent the buyers from cloning the dinos themselves and
      being forced to buy from the InGen front companies.

      On 6/10/13, Dgvaldron <mailto:dgvaldron%40yahoo.ca> wrote:
      > A belated reply to ricks flattering and excellent article. A couple of
      > thoughts.
      >
      > 1) in gen may have inserted frog DNA in as a genetic marker. A signature to
      > demonstrate ownership
      > In case of theft. At least some of the differences in the movies may have
      > been by products of attempts to
      > Obscure those signatures.
      >
      > 2). Question -carnosaur 1985 seems to precede hammonds in gen by a decade?
      >
      >
      > Sent from my iPhone
      >
      > On 2013-06-07, at 2:12 PM, "Bill and Sue-On Hillman"
      > <mailto:hillmans%40westman.wave.ca> wrote:
      >
      >> ERBzine Weekly Webzine: June 6, 2013
      >> http://www.erbzine.com/mag/ez130607.html
      >> * Carson of Venus: New Online Strip Series for Subscription
      >> * Busy Week for ERBzine Editors: Birthday - Lifetime Achievement Award
      >> from Brandon University
      >> * Hillman 2013 Asia Adventure 750 photos
      >> * DOORWAYS TO PELLUCIDAR JURASSIC PARK By Rick Johnson
      >> * Intro: JASON OF PELLUCIDAR novel by Richard Senate
      >> * Amtor Art Gallery by Paul Privitera
      >> * Tarzan Under Fire Intro and start of 84 strips by William Juhre/Don
      >> Garden
      >> * PRINCE VALIANT by Harold Foster
      >> - Episode 19 Trial of Sir Negarth ~ June 19, 1937
      >> - Episode 20 Trial of Sir Negarth (cont.) ~ June 26, 1937
      >> * Tarzan Tells His Story - All 60 John Celardo strips from 1962
      >> * Wall Mural Mosaics
      >>
      >> Bill Hillman
      >> www.ERBzine.com
      >> An all new huge Webzine every Friday at:
      >> www.ERBzine.com/mag
      >> Gateway to ERBzine Archive back to 1996
      >> Over 10,000 Webpages and Webzines
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >

      --
      Rick Johnson
      http://rick-johnson.webs.com/
      "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
      security will soon find that they have neither."



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Den Valdron
      I m not sure what the military application is of an uncontrollable wild animal.   How about this:   Maybe this was a bear-gall-bladder sort of thing. 
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 10, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I'm not sure what the military application is of an uncontrollable wild animal.
         
        How about this:   Maybe this was a bear-gall-bladder sort of thing.  Maybe in order to get up to an active multi-ton animal, you really need to start working on some exotic biochemistry.  Not so much in mammals, the big mammals get the standard issue package.  But the big dinos, might have gone off and done some ferociously exotic stuff.  Growth accelerants, exotic hormones, possibly telomere repair enzymes which might prolong life, pseudo-adrenals for remarkable bursts of strength.  All with huge potential, if you could just get the dinochemicals synching up the right way with human systems.
         
        That In-Gen guy was a jolly old billionaire, wasn't he.  Emphasis on  "old".  Maybe that whole 'theme park or children of all ages was just a cover.  Maybe he was on the trail of something else - regeneration, longevity, maybe immortality."
         
        Maybe the reason that everyone got into it, was that they saw other applications, actual super-soldiers, say.  Super-strength, endurance, heightened reflex speed - neuron boosters, physical regeneration, or improved healing, etc.
         
        That's the big secret carrot dangling in front of everyone.   They all want it.  But they know that to have any chance of isolating it, they need active, full grown 'normalized' animals - full sized, and because they haven't nailed it yet, they're trying it simultaneously with several diferent species.  Looking for the one species or specimen that will give up its brass ring.


        ________________________________
        From: richard johnson <rikjohnson39@...>
        To: barsoom@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, June 10, 2013 5:12:39 PM
        Subject: Re: [barsoom] ERBzine: Carson | Hillman Week | Pellucidar Doorways | Pellucidar fic | Amtor Art | 96 Tarzan Dailies | Foster's Valian 1937 | Mosaics


         

        >>I find myself wondering about the rationales of resurrecting dinosaurs though.

        You mean aside from the fact that people love dinosaurs?
        ot
        Just because they can!

        There is the hoped for military application. My first job with the
        USAF was "possibly illegal" medical experiments on US and Arabian
        troops!
        No good reason, just to see it it worked.
        And sometimes money just gets tossed into a stupid project just to get
        rid of it. If you give the Base $10,000,000 for a year and they somly
        spend $800,000, the next year your find your budget to be $800,000.
        So spending money at the end of the fiscal year is a game companies
        and agencies play. Even it it is buying a failing company and making
        it fail so you can have a tax write-off.

        On 6/10/13, richard johnson <mailto:rikjohnson39%40gmail.com> wrote:
        > The genetic markers to prove copyright sounds good.
        > a number of map companies do that, inserting a street or city that
        > does not exist so that they can prove that the "Moms Map Company"
        > stole maps from "Rand-McNalley".
        >
        > On 6/10/13, richard johnson <mailto:rikjohnson39%40gmail.com> wrote:
        >> True;
        >> if Carnosaur was written in 1985 and Jurassic Park in 1990... the park
        >> was fully functional and the Dinos full-sized and sexually mature
        >> creatures by 1990. *Female Elephants reach adulthood in 10 years,
        >> Males in 14. Sauropods???? T-Rex???
        >> How long would it take the Raptors to reach adulthood and change
        >> gender and breed?
        >> How long would it take to process the legal papers to get sole rights
        >> to those islands?
        >> How long would it take to actually build the Jurassic Park site?
        >>
        >> I an guessing that they started building the sites by 1985 and
        >> breeding the dinos long before that, probably in the US then moved
        >> back to the island after they got title to the islands, smuggling in
        >> the babiesand pretending that they had been bred there. Then by 1990,
        >> they were creating them on site.
        >> The Carnosaur thing may have been a means to make some quick cash AND
        >> hide it before Hammond spent it all.building his theme park.
        >>
        >> So they may have found the first dinos (or carcass) around 1980,
        >> Immediatly started research and legal proceedures to the islands then.
        >> 1985 started building the park andlabs on site. Plus some of the
        >> InGen people were selling fertilized ovum to the other labs to make
        >> money which they would hide when Hammond's plans became known.
        >> By 1990, the park was almost ready to open, the dinos were at least 10
        >> years old and they began to clone them on site by 1990.
        >> a year or three later, Site-B was abandoned because of the lawsuits
        >> and the dinos released.
        >> 1995 Lost World was written and within a year or two after, the dinos
        >> were starving to death.. By 2000, the dinos were extinct again.
        >>
        >> I did note that Carnosaur and the rest had really bad sickly
        >> dinos.which I forgot to mention. Those were probably early clones
        >> before they got the techniques worked out. So Ingen was selling
        >> imperfect eggs with massive genetic problems. Consideringthe trouble
        >> these caused, imagine what would have happened had Ingen sold 'good'
        >> ovum?
        >>
        >> Probably to prevent the buyers from cloning the dinos themselves and
        >> being forced to buy from the InGen front companies.
        >>
        >>
        >> On 6/10/13, Dgvaldron <mailto:dgvaldron%40yahoo.ca> wrote:
        >>> A belated reply to ricks flattering and excellent article. A couple of
        >>> thoughts.
        >>>
        >>> 1) in gen may have inserted frog DNA in as a genetic marker. A
        >>> signature
        >>> to
        >>> demonstrate ownership
        >>> In case of theft. At least some of the differences in the movies may
        >>> have
        >>> been by products of attempts to
        >>> Obscure those signatures.
        >>>
        >>> 2). Question -carnosaur 1985 seems to precede hammonds in gen by a
        >>> decade?
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> Sent from my iPhone
        >>>
        >>> On 2013-06-07, at 2:12 PM, "Bill and Sue-On Hillman"
        >>> <mailto:hillmans%40westman.wave.ca> wrote:
        >>>
        >>>> ERBzine Weekly Webzine: June 6, 2013
        >>>> http://www.erbzine.com/mag/ez130607.html
        >>>> * Carson of Venus: New Online Strip Series for Subscription
        >>>> * Busy Week for ERBzine Editors: Birthday - Lifetime Achievement Award
        >>>> from Brandon University
        >>>> * Hillman 2013 Asia Adventure 750 photos
        >>>> * DOORWAYS TO PELLUCIDAR JURASSIC PARK By Rick Johnson
        >>>> * Intro: JASON OF PELLUCIDAR novel by Richard Senate
        >>>> * Amtor Art Gallery by Paul Privitera
        >>>> * Tarzan Under Fire Intro and start of 84 strips by William Juhre/Don
        >>>> Garden
        >>>> * PRINCE VALIANT by Harold Foster
        >>>> - Episode 19 Trial of Sir Negarth ~ June 19, 1937
        >>>> - Episode 20 Trial of Sir Negarth (cont.) ~ June 26, 1937
        >>>> * Tarzan Tells His Story - All 60 John Celardo strips from 1962
        >>>> * Wall Mural Mosaics
        >>>>
        >>>> Bill Hillman
        >>>> www.ERBzine.com
        >>>> An all new huge Webzine every Friday at:
        >>>> www.ERBzine.com/mag
        >>>> Gateway to ERBzine Archive back to 1996
        >>>> Over 10,000 Webpages and Webzines
        >>>>
        >>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >>>
        >>>
        >>
        >>
        >> --
        >> Rick Johnson
        >> http://rick-johnson.webs.com/
        >> "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
        >> security will soon find that they have neither."
        >>
        >
        >
        > --
        > Rick Johnson
        > http://rick-johnson.webs.com/
        > "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
        > security will soon find that they have neither."
        >

        --
        Rick Johnson
        http://rick-johnson.webs.com/
        "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
        security will soon find that they have neither."



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • mcreek45
        I think regeneration is the most likely. Lizards can regenerate a tail, a complex limb with bones and nerves. Dinosaurs may be able to regenerate even more
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 10, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          I think regeneration is the most likely. Lizards can regenerate a tail, a complex limb with bones and nerves. Dinosaurs may be able to regenerate even more parts, legs, feet, perhaps even organs. This would have huge potential for both military and civilian applications. You are in a traffic collision and your leg is cut off. You take some dinosaur hormones / enzymes or something and you grow back a new leg in six or eight months. Your insurance company is happy. Your doctor is happy. your pharmacy is happy. Your employer is happy. Everyone makes money and you are restored to being whole very quickly. It's also cheaper for everyone than you losing your leg. Lawsuits still happen for pain and suffering so lawyers can still make some money too.

          Imagine the military potential. No more VA hospitals filled with broken soldiers. They take a drug and grow back their arm, leg, or whatever. Soldiers with previously catastrophic injuries return to duty rather than retire. Again, it's cheaper and the outcome is better for everyone. There would be enough money in this for people to invest billions to gain hundreds of billions in revenue.

          Mike Bunkermeister Creek
          Bunker Talk blog

          regeneration




          -----Original Message-----
          From: Den Valdron <dgvaldron@...>
          To: barsoom <barsoom@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Mon, Jun 10, 2013 6:18 pm
          Subject: Re: [barsoom] ERBzine: Carson | Hillman Week | Pellucidar Doorways | Pellucidar fic | Amtor Art | 96 Tarzan Dailies | Foster's Valian 1937 | Mosaics






          I'm not sure what the military application is of an uncontrollable wild animal.

          How about this: Maybe this was a bear-gall-bladder sort of thing. Maybe in order to get up to an active multi-ton animal, you really need to start working on some exotic biochemistry. Not so much in mammals, the big mammals get the standard issue package. But the big dinos, might have gone off and done some ferociously exotic stuff. Growth accelerants, exotic hormones, possibly telomere repair enzymes which might prolong life, pseudo-adrenals for remarkable bursts of strength. All with huge potential, if you could just get the dinochemicals synching up the right way with human systems.

          That In-Gen guy was a jolly old billionaire, wasn't he. Emphasis on "old". Maybe that whole 'theme park or children of all ages was just a cover. Maybe he was on the trail of something else - regeneration, longevity, maybe immortality."

          Maybe the reason that everyone got into it, was that they saw other applications, actual super-soldiers, say. Super-strength, endurance, heightened reflex speed - neuron boosters, physical regeneration, or improved healing, etc.

          That's the big secret carrot dangling in front of everyone. They all want it. But they know that to have any chance of isolating it, they need active, full grown 'normalized' animals - full sized, and because they haven't nailed it yet, they're trying it simultaneously with several diferent species. Looking for the one species or specimen that will give up its brass ring.







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Den Valdron
          Regeneration is right up there.  I don t know that Dinos had the same regenerative capacities as certain lizards.  Probably not.  But it strikes me that
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 10, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Regeneration is right up there.  I don't know that Dinos had the same regenerative capacities as certain lizards.  Probably not.  But it strikes me that they'd have to have something like a regenerative property going on at the cellular chemical level, to keep several dozen tons of reptoflesh going.   Just to keep up with the wear and tear.  Also, some form of cellular regeneration, at the chemical level might have applications for halting or reversing the degeneration of age, at least some of it.
             
            One possibly interesting application is a chemical neural booster, something that helps pass a signal through nerve endings faster.  The thing with T-Rex is that if it as an active hunter, it had to move and react fast, perhaps very very fast.   A sauropod with a brain forty feet from its limbs had to have a fast booster, just to keep the signals from getting tied up and falling over its own feet.


            ________________________________
            From: "mcreek25@..." <mcreek25@...>
            To: barsoom@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, June 10, 2013 8:33:06 PM
            Subject: Re: [barsoom] ERBzine: 1937 | Mosaics


             


            I think regeneration is the most likely. Lizards can regenerate a tail, a complex limb with bones and nerves. Dinosaurs may be able to regenerate even more parts, legs, feet, perhaps even organs. This would have huge potential for both military and civilian applications. You are in a traffic collision and your leg is cut off. You take some dinosaur hormones / enzymes or something and you grow back a new leg in six or eight months. Your insurance company is happy. Your doctor is happy. your pharmacy is happy. Your employer is happy. Everyone makes money and you are restored to being whole very quickly. It's also cheaper for everyone than you losing your leg. Lawsuits still happen for pain and suffering so lawyers can still make some money too.

            Imagine the military potential. No more VA hospitals filled with broken soldiers. They take a drug and grow back their arm, leg, or whatever. Soldiers with previously catastrophic injuries return to duty rather than retire. Again, it's cheaper and the outcome is better for everyone. There would be enough money in this for people to invest billions to gain hundreds of billions in revenue.

            Mike Bunkermeister Creek
            Bunker Talk blog

            regeneration

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Den Valdron <mailto:dgvaldron%40yahoo.ca>
            To: barsoom <mailto:barsoom%40yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Mon, Jun 10, 2013 6:18 pm
            Subject: Re: [barsoom] ERBzine: Carson | Hillman Week | Pellucidar Doorways | Pellucidar fic | Amtor Art | 96 Tarzan Dailies | Foster's Valian 1937 | Mosaics

            I'm not sure what the military application is of an uncontrollable wild animal.

            How about this: Maybe this was a bear-gall-bladder sort of thing. Maybe in order to get up to an active multi-ton animal, you really need to start working on some exotic biochemistry. Not so much in mammals, the big mammals get the standard issue package. But the big dinos, might have gone off and done some ferociously exotic stuff. Growth accelerants, exotic hormones, possibly telomere repair enzymes which might prolong life, pseudo-adrenals for remarkable bursts of strength. All with huge potential, if you could just get the dinochemicals synching up the right way with human systems.

            That In-Gen guy was a jolly old billionaire, wasn't he. Emphasis on "old". Maybe that whole 'theme park or children of all ages was just a cover. Maybe he was on the trail of something else - regeneration, longevity, maybe immortality."

            Maybe the reason that everyone got into it, was that they saw other applications, actual super-soldiers, say. Super-strength, endurance, heightened reflex speed - neuron boosters, physical regeneration, or improved healing, etc.

            That's the big secret carrot dangling in front of everyone. They all want it. But they know that to have any chance of isolating it, they need active, full grown 'normalized' animals - full sized, and because they haven't nailed it yet, they're trying it simultaneously with several diferent species. Looking for the one species or specimen that will give up its brass ring.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Steve
            ... SNIP The size of Sue? 30 years. Something like unto the full adult 20 years. T-rex continues to grow somewhat even after achieving their big growth and
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 11, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In barsoom@yahoogroups.com, richard johnson <rikjohnson39@...> wrote:
              >
              > True;
              > if Carnosaur was written in 1985 and Jurassic Park in 1990... the park
              > was fully functional and the Dinos full-sized and sexually mature
              > creatures by 1990. *Female Elephants reach adulthood in 10 years,
              > Males in 14. Sauropods???? T-Rex???
              SNIP

              The size of Sue? 30 years. Something like unto the full adult 20 years. T-rex continues to grow somewhat even after achieving their big growth and are suspected of being sexually mature more than a few years earlier.

              Steve
            • Steve
              ... I just read the abstract of Currie s paper (Ontogenetic histology of Apatosaurus (Dinosauria: Sauropoda): New insights on growth rates and longevity in
              Message 6 of 14 , Jun 11, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In barsoom@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <hicksc@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In barsoom@yahoogroups.com, richard johnson <rikjohnson39@> wrote:
                > >
                > > True;
                > > if Carnosaur was written in 1985 and Jurassic Park in 1990... the park
                > > was fully functional and the Dinos full-sized and sexually mature
                > > creatures by 1990. *Female Elephants reach adulthood in 10 years,
                > > Males in 14. Sauropods???? T-Rex???
                > SNIP
                >
                > The size of Sue? 30 years. Something like unto the full adult 20 years. T-rex continues to grow somewhat even after achieving their big growth and are suspected of being sexually mature more than a few years earlier.
                >
                > Steve
                >

                I just read the abstract of Currie's paper (Ontogenetic histology of Apatosaurus (Dinosauria: Sauropoda): New insights on growth rates and longevity in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology), part of which reads: "Estimation of ages of ~10 years for large sub-adults refutes the hypothesis that slow, indeterminate growth was required for Apatosaurus and other sauropods to achieve extremely large body sizes."

                So these grow even faster.
              • richard johnson
                I had read papers on bone growth in Dinosaurs which indicate that early growth was very rapid! I suppose to prevent the young from being left behind or
                Message 7 of 14 , Jun 11, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  I had read papers on bone growth in Dinosaurs which indicate that early
                  growth was very rapid! I suppose to prevent the young from being left
                  behind or stepped on by adults.
                  This implies that as the Dinos in Jurassic Park were adults! As well as
                  those in Carnosaur, etc, InGen had them cloned long years, maybe decades
                  before they opened the park in 1990.

                  This implies that instead of using current cloning technology to clone
                  their Dinos, they could have found the dinos and dumped millions into
                  cloning just to be able to get the clones viable.

                  The first ones weren't 'perfect' so were sold to recover losses.

                  I recall when someone got the idea of gene splicing insulin into E Coli to
                  produce mass amounts of cheap insulin.
                  It worked.... but the insulin wasn't 'perfect' and killed a lot of people
                  before they got the technique down and working right.

                  If InGen found the dinos in the 60's, or earlier (via a parent company*),
                  they would have tried to clone them and failed miserably. So sold the
                  imperfect clones and kept at it.

                  * There are drug companies who hire people whose only job is to travel
                  around the world and talk to the local witches to learn what plants do what
                  i the hope of finding new drugs.
                  Perhaps some company was doing a similar search when they found the dinos
                  (dead or such) and created InGen as a means of capitalizing on the find??



                  On Tue, Jun 11, 2013 at 6:05 AM, Steve <hicksc@...> wrote:

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In barsoom@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <hicksc@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In barsoom@yahoogroups.com, richard johnson <rikjohnson39@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > True;
                  > > > if Carnosaur was written in 1985 and Jurassic Park in 1990... the park
                  > > > was fully functional and the Dinos full-sized and sexually mature
                  > > > creatures by 1990. *Female Elephants reach adulthood in 10 years,
                  > > > Males in 14. Sauropods???? T-Rex???
                  > > SNIP
                  > >
                  > > The size of Sue? 30 years. Something like unto the full adult 20 years.
                  > T-rex continues to grow somewhat even after achieving their big growth and
                  > are suspected of being sexually mature more than a few years earlier.
                  > >
                  > > Steve
                  > >
                  >
                  > I just read the abstract of Currie's paper (Ontogenetic histology of
                  > Apatosaurus (Dinosauria: Sauropoda): New insights on growth rates and
                  > longevity in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology), part of which reads:
                  > "Estimation of ages of ~10 years for large sub-adults refutes the
                  > hypothesis that slow, indeterminate growth was required for Apatosaurus and
                  > other sauropods to achieve extremely large body sizes."
                  >
                  > So these grow even faster.
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  --
                  Rick Johnson
                  http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
                  "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
                  security will soon find that they have neither."


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • sailor.barsoom
                  ... ... Yes. Ethnobotanists. Gotta be one of the coolest jobs around. You know, we don t see much of medicine in Pellucidar. There s gotta be a few
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jun 11, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In barsoom, richard johnson wrote:

                    <snip>

                    > * There are drug companies who hire people whose only job is
                    > to travel around the world and talk to the local witches to
                    > learn what plants do what i the hope of finding new drugs.

                    Yes. Ethnobotanists. Gotta be one of the coolest jobs around.

                    You know, we don't see much of medicine in Pellucidar. There's gotta be a few Nobel Prizes waiting to be earned in those ever-noon jungles.
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.