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Re: [barsoom] re: Torakar of Mars

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  • Den Valdron
    ... evokes those authors - it s an entertaining juxtaposition. I thought I should mention a little more. I was fairly directly inspired by Lovecraft here, and
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 12, 2006
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      > The "thing in the pit" certainly
      evokes those authors - it's an entertaining
      juxtaposition.

      I thought I should mention a little more. I was
      fairly directly inspired by Lovecraft here, and this
      section is a genuine tribute. Lovecraft was the
      master of escalating horror. His characters
      frequently descended.

      Thus in "Randolf Carter" his protagonist descends a
      set of steps extending infinitely downwards into a
      crypt, as things become more and more horrific. "Red
      Hook" features a similar progression down into caverns
      beneath New York. "At the Mountains of Madness" also
      has a geographic progression down into lower and lower
      levels and ever more evil and surreal scenes.

      Lovecraft didn't always use actual descents as
      metaphors, but in his best stories, his characters are
      always in one way or another, on a journey into
      horror, each step taking them a little further
      downward into the abyss, each revelation building on
      the next, until ultimate horror is revealed.

      His characters often travel in pairs. There is the
      explorer, unravelling the puzzle, exposing greater and
      greater horrors, and the observer, who follows along,
      recording it and surviving to tell the tale.

      The final revelation, as in "The Mountains of Madness"
      is of a super-evil that makes the abominations which
      come before it seem ordinary, something so profoundly
      awful that your entire landscape of good and bad is
      forcibly rearranged, and the characters are forced to
      flee, their minds all but shattered.

      A couple of specific tropes that I borrowed directly
      from Lovecraft - his notion of cosmic age. The Tower
      of Korvas appears to be both unearthly, and impossibly
      vastly older than the rock that surrounds it. It's as
      if the cliff face formed around the tower.

      Second, the things in the tower, the gibbering
      obscenities that need no food or water but simply
      endure. That's basically a direct borrow from "The
      Case of Charles Dexter Ward"

      I'm pretty sure that most of you have read Lovecraft.
      But if you haven't, please feel free to acquaint
      yourself with a guilty pleasure.






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