Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

CfP: Transmedial Practices in Post-Communist Spaces (Digital Icons)

Expand Messages
  • Balkan Academic News
    Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media Issue 5 (Spring 2011) CFP: Transmedial Practices in Post-Communist Spaces Deadline
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 7, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media
      Issue 5 (Spring 2011)

      CFP: Transmedial Practices in Post-Communist Spaces

      Deadline for Submission: 1 February 2011 Anticipated date of publication: May 2011
      http://www.digitalicons.org/ editor@...

      Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media’s fifth issue invites submissions on all aspects of new media use in the region as well as submissions on the topic of transmedial practices that will form the cluster of the issue.

      The apex of media separation curiously coincided with the Cold War, a period when clear boundaries were established not only between ideological spaces but also between media platforms. Following the end of one-party states in the late 1980s and early the 1990s, a discourse of the new was established, becoming the dominant paradigm in the ensuing decade. This discourse took the form of various transition theories, studies into new identities and examinations of practices that negated previous experiences. With the arrival of new digital means of communication and their popular use, the field of scholarly exploration expanded to include zones of intersection between old and new media, past and present experiences, reflecting on strategies of re-use and recycling and associated sense of nostalgia. Now that media convergence in post-communist states is a fact that is hard to deny, we hope to start a discussion of how transmedial practices operate in the region and what political, social and cultural implications they have.

      We are particularly interested in the following questions: How does the speed of media convergence compare across the region? How do practitioners and audiences assess the impact of ‘new media’ on ‘traditional media’ and vice versa? How do local communities utilize transmedial platforms such as Twitter? What is the role of transnational communities in exploiting and expanding the transmedial space? What cognitive and narrative strategies are used in cross-platforms environments? How do we study transmedial interactions in persistent worlds? How do we conceptualize political and cultural boundaries in transmedial contexts? How does academic work reflect the arrival of transmedial practices as new ways of producing and disseminating knowledge? How do new market economies in post-communist states exploit transmedial labour?

      We are interested in research exploring transmedial practices in post-Soviet states as well as post-communist Central Europe. We particularly invite comparative essays on these and other countries. While articles on transmedial practices will form a thematic cluster in this issue, submissions on other topics are also strongly encouraged.

      When submitting your work, please include the following information in English: a biographical statement (100-120 words), 6-10 key words and an abstract/description of the submission (or the first paragraph of the essay if appropriate) (about 150 words).
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.