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New publications: From the Ground Up: Assessing the Record of Anticorruption Assistance in Southeastern Europe & Social Capital in Central and Eastern Europe: A Critical Assessment and Literature Review.

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  • andrew cartwright
    New Publications from the Center for Policy Studies The Center for Policy Studies at Central European University (Budapest, Hungary) offers two new
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 6, 2004
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      New Publications from the Center for Policy Studies

      The Center for Policy Studies at Central European
      University (Budapest, Hungary) offers two new
      publications in its CPS Policy Studies series. Both
      publications can be downloaded in pdf-format at
      <http://www.ceu.hu/cps/pub/pub_polstud.htm>. A limited
      number of prints can be ordered for free from Borbala
      Varga at vargab@... or via fax 00 36 1 235 6170.

      From the Ground Up: Assessing the Record of
      Anticorruption Assistance in Southeastern Europe

      Based on research findings from twenty case studies of
      donor-supported projects in Albania, Bosnia and
      Herzegovina, Bulgaria and Macedonia, the paper
      assesses the effects of five years of anticorruption
      projects and high-profile public awareness campaigns
      in the Southeastern European region. As a starting
      point, the paper posits that while projects seem to
      have succeeded in raising demand for reform,
      solutions to match that demand have yet to be found.
      The authors question both what reforms or change in
      particular the projects raised demand for, and what
      success the solutions applied thus far may claim.

      The donor community's failure to meet the high public
      expectations that their projects fostered comes
      against a disturbing backdrop of falling trust in
      democratic institutions in the region. In conclusion,
      the paper argues that donors should seek to build
      sustained public demand for a realistic, long-term
      anticorruption reform agenda. This can be achieved by
      moving away from the fight against corruption per
      se-characterized by large-scale awareness raising and
      broad NGO coalitions-and towards mobilizing
      well-defined constituencies behind focused governance
      reforms that have a clear impact and benefits for
      those involved; and by encouraging citizens to fight
      corruption through the democratic, political
      mechanisms of representation by supporting, among
      others, political party reform. If anticorruption
      reforms are layered within the political process and
      meet public needs, the long awaited mobilizational
      potential of the anticorruption agenda might yet be
      realized.

      Martin Tisné and Daniel Smilov. From the Ground Up.
      Assessing the Record of Anticorruption Assistance in
      Southeastern Europe. (Budapest: Center for Policy
      Studies, July 2004)


      Social Capital in Central and Eastern Europe: A
      Critical Assessment and Literature Review.

      Ever since the early 1990s, social capital has
      attracted increasing attention amongst social science
      researchers. With its focus on the importance of
      intangible resources such as trust, social capital
      appeared to supplement existing theories of social and
      economic change. For its early proponents such as
      Bourdieu, Coleman and more famously, Putnam, social
      capital could be understood as a critical component in
      social reproduction, educational achievement and
      administrative efficiency.

      Social capital seems especially relevant in Central
      and Eastern Europe and the countries of the former
      Soviet Union. Not only does it direct attention to
      informal networks as ways of getting things done, it
      also explores how strong ties of personal trust
      co-exist with low levels of general trust and how this
      can affect economic and political reform. In terms of
      its actual policy implications, the conclusions of
      social capital research have not always been clear and
      it may be fair to say that expectations have been
      scaled down since the World Bank declared that social
      capital to be the missing link.

      This study offers a critical review of over seventy
      studies that have applied social capital to
      developments in Central and Eastern Europe and the
      former Soviet Union. The author draws from a variety
      of social science disciplines as well as including
      several reports from international organizations. The
      aim of the review is investigate some of the principal
      fields in which social capital has been used to date
      and to examine how such research can help to encourage
      institutional and policy innovation.

      Dimitrina Mihaylova. Social Capital in Central and
      Eastern Europe. A Critical Assessment and Literature
      Review. (Budapest: Center for Policy Studies, July
      2004)







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