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  • Florian Bieber
    1. Situation of Young People in South East Europe 2. EWR Romania, 6/2002, September 3. The Role of the European Union as a Third Party in Resolution of
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 5, 2002
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      1. Situation of Young People in South East Europe
      2. EWR Romania, 6/2002, September
      3. The Role of the European Union as a Third Party in Resolution of
      External Conflicts: The Case of the Cyprus Problem



      1. REPORT ON THE SITUATION OF YOUNG PEOPLE IN SOUTH EAST EUROPE
      The European Youth Forum has produced a Report on the Situation of Young People in South East Europe, which gives an overview of existing research in the field and which presents possible measures and recommendations for governments in the region to help them deal with the challenges in the youth sector.
      You can find the report in pdf version on: http://www.youthforum.org


      2. EWR Romania, 6/2002, September
      Abstract
      Romania's macro-economic performance has been surprisingly good over the
      last two years. However, the 'Economy' section warns against some of the
      threats to the current economic recovery. The accumulation of soft credits
      in the energy sector presents the risk of generating Bancorex-type
      collapses. Unless public utility companies undergo deep restructuring, the
      energy sector will continue to plague the economy (low productivity, high
      real wages) and is likely to stifle its growth. The Government should take
      determined actions in this respect, sooner rather than later.
      Equally in the Economy section, it is argued that the planned privatization
      of Romania's largest bank (BCR) and of its national oil company (Petrom)
      should be handled with special care to avoid unintended consequences. These
      are not just regular privatization deals, but are linked with Romania's
      overall economic perspectives for years to come.
      The shortcomings of the new Labor Code, and its damaging potential to the
      economy, are discussed in the 'Social' section, which also focuses on the
      problems of the institutionalized child-care system.
      The 'Politics' section discusses the challenges and opportunities that the
      likely invitation to join NATO at the Prague summit bring to Romania.
      Getting the invitation is just a new beginning, not the end for Romania's
      efforts to prepare for full NATO membership. On a controversial matter, the
      EWR considers that Romania's decision to sign a bilateral treaty that
      exempts the US military from prosecution by the International War Crimes
      Tribunal was the wisest decision under the circumstances.
      Click on this link in order to download the pdf file containing the report
      (you need Adobe Acrobat Reader(c) in order to open this file):
      http://www.sar.org.ro/ewrpdf/ewr6ro2002.pdf


      3. The Role of the European Union as a Third Party in Resolution of
      External Conflicts: The Case of the Cyprus Problem"
      BY: AHMET SOZEN
      University of Bahcesehir
      Department of Political Science and International
      Relations
      Document: Available from the SSRN Electronic Paper Collection:
      http://papers.ssrn.com/paper.taf?abstract_id=314822
      Paper ID: IACM 15th Annual Conference
      Contact: AHMET SOZEN
      Email: Mailto:sozen@...
      Postal: University of Bahcesehir
      Department of Political Science and
      International Relations
      34900 Bahcesehir-Istanbul, TURKEY
      Phone: +90-212-669-7735
      Fax: +90-212-669-4398
      ABSTRACT:
      As a candidate for European Union (EU) membership Cyprus
      represents a unique challenge for the Union. Unlike the other
      five Central and Eastern European countries (CEEC) that are
      striving for EU membership in the next phase of expansion (the
      Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland, and Slovenia), Cyprus
      carries with it a serious problem of the unsolved political
      conflict between the Greek and Turkish Cypriots.
      The status quo of division on the Island raises the question:
      Is the EU really determined to inherit the Cyprus problem by
      granting membership to the Greek part of the Island? Almost all
      signs coming from the EU institutions show that a solution is
      not a pre-condition for the EU membership of the Island.
      However, the EU emphasizes that it prefers a solution before the
      final membership accession of Cyprus.
      Although the EU is not an active and direct actor of the
      Cyprus negotiations, it changed the arithmetic of the Cyprus
      negotiations as a third party by offering a huge side payment -
      namely the EU membership for the Island. The EU, therefore,
      became an indirect mediator in Cyprus negotiations.
      In this paper, the author analyzes the potential that the EU
      has in contributing to the resolution of the Cyprus conflict as
      a third party. In that regard, what mediating role (if ever)
      should the EU play to facilitate a solution in the Island before
      the final accession? is the main question of this paper.
      First, the author provides a short background on the Cyprus
      conflict and the involvement of the EU in Cyprus conflict and
      negotiations. Second, the author analyses the track record of
      the EU as a third party in resolving external conflicts.
      Finally, the author evaluates the potential of the EU and the
      other third parties in playing the role of a mediator in Cyprus
      conflict.
      The analysis regarding the Cyprus conflict and negotiations in
      the paper is predominantly based on survey data conducted by the
      author on elites obtained from field research in Cyprus, Greece,
      Turkey, Belgium and the UK (1997-98) and updated data of similar
      interviews (2001). Here, the author utilizes game theory in
      explaining the strategic decisions of the disputed actors and
      the possible outcomes of the Cyprus negotiations. In addition,
      the author uses archival date regarding the EU involvement in
      external conflicts.

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