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Amazon tribe sighting raises contact dilemma

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  • Wayne Radinsky
    Amazon Indians from one of the world s last uncontacted tribes have been photographed from the air, with images released showing them painted bright red and
    Message 1 of 3 , May 31, 2008
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      Amazon Indians from one of the world's last uncontacted tribes have
      been photographed from the air, with images released showing them
      painted bright red and brandishing bows and arrows

      Brazil: Isolated tribe photographed
      http://www.reuters.com/news/video?videoId=83635

      I used to think the last uncontacted tribes had been contacted in
      Papua New Guinea in the 1990's, but apparently I'm completely wrong.
      Or maybe it depends on what you mean by "uncontacted"; the Papual
      Guinea tribe had no knowledge of the existence of modern
      civilization, but these Amazon tribes know about and deliberately
      hide from civilization.

      Amazon tribe sighting raises contact dilemma
      http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/idUSN2938303320080530

      The article has the statement, "In 508 years of history, out of the
      thousands of tribes that exist none have adapted well to society in
      Brazil." It goes on to cite vulnerability to diseases they were never
      exposed to before as the major problem. But I was just talking to a
      friend of mine in Australia yesterday, and he was telling me that
      about 50% of the native Aboriginal Australians end up in prison at
      some point in their lives, and the suicide rates are sky high
      compared with the rest of the population of Australia. And I was
      thinking, here is the US, what native American tribes have adapted
      well to society? It seems the best possible adaptation is to run
      casinos.

      The reason this is interesting is that is shows what happens when two
      human societies at two different stages of development come in
      contact. One is in the hunter-gatherer stage, and one is in the
      agricultural/industrial stage. The verdict so far seems to be
      unqualified disaster for the hunter-gatherer society. Just the
      natural course of evolution?

      I don't know what Sabore Oiye and Salaton Ole' Ntutu had to say about
      what is happening in Africa as the video feed was not working. But I
      thought you all might like to know about the news of the Amazon tribe.

      There is also a film at

      Uncontacted Tribes
      http://www.survival-international.org/campaigns/uncontactedtribes


      Wayne
    • Troy Gardner
      ... Supposedly this tribe is one of a 100 known in the world as uncontacted . From the perspective of indians, being buzzed by these steel birds/insects is
      Message 2 of 3 , May 31, 2008
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        --- Wayne Radinsky <waynerad@...> wrote:

        > Amazon Indians from one of the world's last uncontacted tribes have
        > been photographed from the air, with images released showing them
        > painted bright red and brandishing bows and arrows
        >
        > Brazil: Isolated tribe photographed
        > http://www.reuters.com/news/video?videoId=83635

        Supposedly this tribe is one of a 100 known in the world as 'uncontacted'.

        From the perspective of indians, being buzzed by these steel birds/insects is
        probably a bad omen, signifying the end of the world, shame that it's probably
        true from their perspective.

        I wonder if/how many illegal loggers run into these tribes, and what happens in
        the exchange first contact.
      • Wayne Radinsky
        ... The answers are on the tribal people s advocacy website, see + Why do they hide? + Many tribal people who are today uncontacted are in fact the survivors
        Message 3 of 3 , May 31, 2008
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          On Sat, May 31, 2008 at 11:08 AM, Troy Gardner <thegreyman@...> wrote:
          >
          > From the perspective of indians, being buzzed by these steel birds/insects is
          > probably a bad omen, signifying the end of the world, shame that it's probably
          > true from their perspective.
          >
          > I wonder if/how many illegal loggers run into these tribes, and what happens in
          > the exchange first contact.

          The answers are on the tribal people's advocacy website, see

          + Why do they hide? +
          Many tribal people who are today 'uncontacted' are in fact the
          survivors (or survivors' descendants) of past atrocities. These acts
          -- massacres, disease epidemics, terrifying violence -- are seared into
          their collective memory, and contact with the outside world is now to
          be avoided at all costs.
          http://www.survival-international.org/campaigns/uncontactedtribes/whydotheyhide

          and the other articles in 'Learn more'.
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