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Re: [bafuture] Police Say They Can't Keep Up with Cyber Criminals

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  • Chris Phoenix
    The U.S. road system is largely uncontrolled. We have speed limits and similar laws to minimize the logistical problems. But there are no checkpoints
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 1, 2002
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      The U.S. road system is largely uncontrolled. We have speed limits and
      similar laws to minimize the logistical problems. But there are no
      checkpoints established just in case someone drives by with a kidnapped
      person in their car. We do sometimes put up speed traps, drunk-driving
      checkpoints, and police roadblocks, but these are transient and are not
      part of the basic workings of the roads. The road system is an
      infrastructure, and is usable by all kinds of people. The Internet is
      also an infrastructure.

      Let me digress a moment to talk about ethical systems, because this is
      important to the topic. Different groups, such as police departments,
      businesses, and Open Source projects, have very different ethics.
      Guardian-type groups deal with zero-sum situations; their purpose is to
      prevent damage. Commercial-type groups deal with positive-sum
      transactions; their purpose is to maximize value. Information-type
      groups deal with unlimited-sum situations; they exist to promote and
      distribute creativity. Mixing and matching ethics is a bad idea--for
      example, the Mafia mixes Guardian ethics (force, loyalty, deceit) with
      Commercial ethics (acquire money, be efficient).

      One of the main uses of computers/networks is to copy information. This
      ease of copying has created a whole new ethical system, as shown by the
      "Hacker Ethic" (before "hacker" became a bad word) and more recently the
      Open Source movement. This leads to what I call the Information
      ethics. Businesses can use the Internet to help them make money--as
      long as they use business ethics and don't try to adopt hacker ethics.
      "Information economy" is an oxymoron, and failure to realize this is
      what killed the dot-com businesses. They recognized the unlimited-sum
      potential of the Information system. Then they confused the Information
      system with the Internet. They had great growth numbers as long as they
      gave away Information for free, but as soon as they started trying to
      charge for it, their clients (I won't call them customers) quite
      properly deserted them as unethical. Brick-and-mortar businesses who
      used the Internet merely as a new infrastructure did quite well.

      What does this have to do with the topic? It's very simple. Businesses
      failed to commercialize the Internet. Napster failed also--because it
      tried to extend Information ethics (copy freely) into the domain of
      Commerce. Anyone who tries to apply their particular ethics to the
      whole of the Internet will either fail miserably, or destroy most of the
      potential the Internet. All this article is saying is that the
      Guardians can't apply their ethics and methods to the Internet. That's
      quite predictable. And not necessarily a cause for alarm, in a broader
      sense. No infrastructure should be completely under Guardian control.
      Of course Guardians need access to it, to keep the criminals down. But
      if they had full control, the whole thing would turn into a stagnant,
      zero-sum, piece of bureaucracy--worse than the U.S. postal system and
      income tax law combined.

      What should we do? Recognize that, just as we need a vehicle code, we
      need some "traffic cops" on the Internet--something that can ride on the
      infrastructure and enforce some laws. There was a Slashdot story
      recently about a company that's making lists of the biggest file
      sharers, and some of those sharers are going to find themselves
      imprisoned. But recognize that the Guardians must also be limited and
      cannot be expected--or allowed!--to be as successful as they would like
      to be. There is absolutely no way to stop every child porn ring short
      of shutting down the Net entirely. Of course we had child porn rings
      before we had the Internet, and we weren't able to get rid of all of
      them then either.

      The DDOS-extortion scenario is a different type of problem. A variety
      of groups will want to use the tactic, and with varying degrees of
      sophistication. There'll be a technical arms race. But I doubt that
      any law enforcement organization will be able to do much about the
      actual act--they'll have to try to catch the criminals when they recover
      the ransom, etc. Assuming money is the motivation. But locking down
      the Internet is not the answer. Making it more flexible and adaptable
      with better protocols may be the answer. Not the kind of thing Guardian
      organizations are good at!

      So, just like cops can't stop you for no reason, they should not be able
      to arbitrarily regulate the Internet. There are deep ethical reasons
      why that would be a very bad idea.

      Chris

      genomik2 wrote:
      >
      > Police Say They Can't Keep Up with Cyber Criminals
      >
      > This illustrates the need for a more controlled internet. The
      > anarchy of
      > freedom does not really extend to security. You either give more
      > hierarchecal control to master controller servers, design safer
      > systems
      > or increase surveillance (law enforcement). Probably all three of
      > these
      > will work. Corruption is perhaps the main reason why 3rd world
      > countries
      > stay 3rd world. Not making the internet safe makes it sort of 3rd
      > world!
      > Law enforcment must have better tools than criminals/terrorists.
      >
      > The internet started as a Libertarian tool for educated scientists
      > and
      > Americans. As the rest of the less developed world jumps on, I think
      > you
      > will find Libertarian principles taken advantage of.
      >
      > As tools for damage become more distributed, there will be increased
      > need for security and control. Surveillance is one of ways to provide
      > this, both in our real, and electronic worlds.
      >
      > Erik
      > ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
      >
      > Police Say They Can't Keep Up with Cyber Criminals
      > Fri Nov 1, 7:45 AM ET
      > By Bernhard Warner, European Internet Correspondent
      >
      > LONDON (Reuters) - Europe is losing out in its fight against cyber
      > crime, a top law enforcement official said on Friday.
      >
      > "With cyber crime, it's become so obvious that we've lost the battle
      > even before we've begun to fight. We can't keep up," Rolf Hegel,
      > head of
      > Europol's serious crime department, told the Compsec 2002 computer
      > security conference here.
      >
      > The broad threat of cyber crime has puzzled police forces around the
      > world for years. And now there is mounting evidence that organized
      > criminal groups are using new technologies to commit everyday crimes
      > and
      > some new ones.
      >
      > The Internet and mobile phones have become a reliable tool for
      > criminals, experts say, used in child pornography rings and in a
      > hush-hush crime that is hitting the corporate world with more
      > regularity: threatening to unleash denial of service attacks (news -
      > web
      > sites) on targeted computer networks to extort money from
      > businesses.
      >
      > Police can't keep up. "We are far behind," Hegel said.
      >
      > Last month, Europol formed the High Tech Crime Center, a task force
      > with
      > a mission to co-ordinate cross-border cyber crime investigations in
      > Europe. Hegel said the force is under-manned and under-resourced now,
      > but he hopes it will begin to make a difference in future
      > investigations.
      >
      > There is a sense of urgency amid the law enforcement community to
      > beef
      > up its digital sleuthing capabilities.
      >
      > A co-ordinated attack on a clutch of central Internet root servers
      > across the globe earlier this month has puzzled law enforcement
      > officials, stoking fears it could be the work of an organized
      > criminal
      > group aiming to disrupt vital communications networks.
      >
      > Hegel admitted that if such an attack targeted a European
      > communications
      > network today, police would have a very difficult time tracking down
      > the
      > culprits. The High Tech Crime Center was formed to beef up
      > investigations into such occurrences, he added.
      >
      > "We will focus our efforts on organized criminal groups," he said,
      > but
      > added assistance was needed from the victims who are often reluctant
      > to
      > share information with police for fear it will harm their business.
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > bafuture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

      --
      Chris Phoenix cphoenix@... http://www.best.com/~cphoenix
      Interests: nanotechnology, dyslexia, caving, filk, SF, patent
      reform, stained glass, hang gliding
    • genomik2
      Police Say They Can t Keep Up with Cyber Criminals This illustrates the need for a more controlled internet. The anarchy of freedom does not really extend to
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 1, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Police Say They Can't Keep Up with Cyber Criminals

        This illustrates the need for a more controlled internet. The
        anarchy of
        freedom does not really extend to security. You either give more
        hierarchecal control to master controller servers, design safer
        systems
        or increase surveillance (law enforcement). Probably all three of
        these
        will work. Corruption is perhaps the main reason why 3rd world
        countries
        stay 3rd world. Not making the internet safe makes it sort of 3rd
        world!
        Law enforcment must have better tools than criminals/terrorists.

        The internet started as a Libertarian tool for educated scientists
        and
        Americans. As the rest of the less developed world jumps on, I think
        you
        will find Libertarian principles taken advantage of.

        As tools for damage become more distributed, there will be increased
        need for security and control. Surveillance is one of ways to provide
        this, both in our real, and electronic worlds.

        Erik
        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


        Police Say They Can't Keep Up with Cyber Criminals
        Fri Nov 1, 7:45 AM ET
        By Bernhard Warner, European Internet Correspondent

        LONDON (Reuters) - Europe is losing out in its fight against cyber
        crime, a top law enforcement official said on Friday.

        "With cyber crime, it's become so obvious that we've lost the battle
        even before we've begun to fight. We can't keep up," Rolf Hegel,
        head of
        Europol's serious crime department, told the Compsec 2002 computer
        security conference here.

        The broad threat of cyber crime has puzzled police forces around the
        world for years. And now there is mounting evidence that organized
        criminal groups are using new technologies to commit everyday crimes
        and
        some new ones.

        The Internet and mobile phones have become a reliable tool for
        criminals, experts say, used in child pornography rings and in a
        hush-hush crime that is hitting the corporate world with more
        regularity: threatening to unleash denial of service attacks (news -
        web
        sites) on targeted computer networks to extort money from
        businesses.

        Police can't keep up. "We are far behind," Hegel said.

        Last month, Europol formed the High Tech Crime Center, a task force
        with
        a mission to co-ordinate cross-border cyber crime investigations in
        Europe. Hegel said the force is under-manned and under-resourced now,
        but he hopes it will begin to make a difference in future
        investigations.

        There is a sense of urgency amid the law enforcement community to
        beef
        up its digital sleuthing capabilities.

        A co-ordinated attack on a clutch of central Internet root servers
        across the globe earlier this month has puzzled law enforcement
        officials, stoking fears it could be the work of an organized
        criminal
        group aiming to disrupt vital communications networks.

        Hegel admitted that if such an attack targeted a European
        communications
        network today, police would have a very difficult time tracking down
        the
        culprits. The High Tech Crime Center was formed to beef up
        investigations into such occurrences, he added.

        "We will focus our efforts on organized criminal groups," he said,
        but
        added assistance was needed from the victims who are often reluctant
        to
        share information with police for fear it will harm their business.
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