Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Human Evolution Future Salon Screen Shots

Expand Messages
  • Kennita Watson
    ... Very funny. I am pretty well convinced that I don t know anything, even the things I think I know. So I could come up with confusions till the cows come
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 17, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Wayne Radinsky <waynerad@...> wrote:
      > Herr Finnern wrote:
      >> Q: Why did you write the book? A:Over the years Joel followed his
      >> confusion. Things that just didn't make sense. ...
      >
      ...
      > I have a question. Let's do a survey, on the email list
      > here. The question is: What is *your* confusion?
      >
      > I'm really curious to see if anybody actually answers this
      > question since people always like to make themselves look
      > good in front of other people. And admitting that you don't
      > know something doesn't make you look good does it? But
      > admitting that you don't know is exactly what you have to
      > do to answer this question.

      Very funny. I am pretty well convinced that I don't
      know anything, even the things I think I know. So I
      could come up with confusions till the cows come
      home. But many of them are of the form "How...?" or
      "What...?", and nothing stood out. Then there are
      the "Why...?" questions. They're interesting because
      they often have to do with people. Many would claim
      that they are imponderable, or at least irreducible,
      because there is a different answer for each person.
      But one that's been bugging me for a long time is
      "Why do negotiations take so long?". The issues to
      be decided seem straightforward, such that it seems
      to me that they should be decidable in minutes or
      hours, and maybe days or a week or two if messages
      need to be relayed to a central authority. But
      months (e.g., budget negotiations) ??!? It boggles
      my mind.

      Live long and prosper,
      Kennita
      --
      Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;
      none but ourselves can free our minds.
      -- Bob Marley, "Redemption Song"
    • Nanyun Zhang
      ... I never thought that asking questions or showing your confusion can make you look not good. It may be true in a control and command system, such as in
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 18, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        > I'm really curious to see if anybody actually answers this
        > question since people always like to make themselves look
        > good in front of other people. And admitting that you don't
        > know something doesn't make you look good does it? But
        > admitting that you don't know is exactly what you have to
        > do to answer this question.

        I never thought that asking questions or showing your confusion can make you look not good. It may be true in a control and command system, such as in corporation and military. But it is not true in research field and academe. Any good research topic began with a good question. And your peers can immediately make judgment about your competence and potential in the field by the questions you asked.

        Anyway, many things have been confusing me...to ask the right question to the right people, I want to mention here is how we people need and rely on authority, or how well we can achieve in self-organization? This question is from my recent research on peer-to-peer system and its incentive mechanism issue. Of course, nothing new with the question; and the question means differently to different parties--government regulator, entrepreneur, network designer or copyright holder. If we focus on the prosperity of network itself, as we can observe from Napster and BitTorrent, including an authority or a control center led to better performances of the network; but it is more vulnerable to outside attack. A decentralized scheme such as in Kazaa has no availability problems but lacks integrity; for example Kazaa is plagued with many fake files, or essentially, the free riding problem.

        While we may be excited by the idea of a decentralized computing/data exchanging world, how well are people up to such a system? I do not expect any simple answers; but it seems important in understanding the future of p2p networking.

        Nanyun

        Kennita Watson <kennita@...> wrote:
        Wayne Radinsky <waynerad@...> wrote:
        > Herr Finnern wrote:
        >> Q: Why did you write the book? A:Over the years Joel followed his
        >> confusion. Things that just didn't make sense. ...
        >
        ...
        > I have a question. Let's do a survey, on the email list
        > here. The question is: What is *your* confusion?
        >
        > I'm really curious to see if anybody actually answers this
        > question since people always like to make themselves look
        > good in front of other people. And admitting that you don't
        > know something doesn't make you look good does it? But
        > admitting that you don't know is exactly what you have to
        > do to answer this question.

        Very funny. I am pretty well convinced that I don't
        know anything, even the things I think I know. So I
        could come up with confusions till the cows come
        home. But many of them are of the form "How...?" or
        "What...?", and nothing stood out. Then there are
        the "Why...?" questions. They're interesting because
        they often have to do with people. Many would claim
        that they are imponderable, or at least irreducible,
        because there is a different answer for each person.
        But one that's been bugging me for a long time is
        "Why do negotiations take so long?". The issues to
        be decided seem straightforward, such that it seems
        to me that they should be decidable in minutes or
        hours, and maybe days or a week or two if messages
        need to be relayed to a central authority. But
        months (e.g., budget negotiations) ??!? It boggles
        my mind.

        Live long and prosper,
        Kennita
        --
        Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;
        none but ourselves can free our minds.
        -- Bob Marley, "Redemption Song"



        bafuture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



        ---------------------------------
        Yahoo! Groups Links

        To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bafuture/

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        bafuture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




        ---------------------------------------------------------------------
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you did not do than those you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. Give yourself away to the sea of life."
        -Mark Twain
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.