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Re: So...despite all this technology..How come disease is making so much progress?

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  • Kennita Watson
    ... The simple answer is that people have many different priorities -- diseases have only one thing to do. ... (That s affect --- check out both on
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 10, 2005
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      Joschka Fisher <grabarkowic@...> wrote:
      > Subject: So...despite all this technology..How come disease is making
      > so much progress?

      The simple answer is that people have many different
      priorities -- diseases have only one thing to do.
      >

      > Now a case is reported in NYState. CWD is a cousin of
      > Mad Cow. Suppossedly it doesn't effect humans.

      (That's "affect" --- check out both on dictionary.com.)

      > Marburg haemorrhagic fever in Angola - update 9
      >
      > Mobile surveillance teams in Uige were forced to
      > suspend operations yesterday when vehicles were
      > attacked and damaged by local residents.

      Many of those different priorities are counter to the
      cause of halting disease.

      > WHO staff in Uige were notified today of several
      > fatalities but teams were unable to investigate the
      > cause of death or collect the bodies for safe burial.
      > Discussions have been held with provincial authorities
      > to find urgent solutions.
      >
      > The dramatic symptoms of Marburg haemorrhagic fever
      > and its frequent fatality are resulting in a high
      > level of fear, which is further aggravated by a lack
      > of public understanding of the disease.

      The technology need not be high-tech, just ubiquitous,
      such as radios and television, and information needs to
      be forthcoming.

      > Moreover,
      > because the disease has no cure, hospitalization is
      > not associated with a favourable outcome, and
      > confidence in the medical care system has been eroded.

      PR is also an issue.
      >
      > Public
      > compliance with control measures is not expected to
      > improve in the absence of intense campaigns to educate
      > the public about the disease ( more data at this link
      > http://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_04_08a/en/

      So is education.

      > "Nine people who were in contact with an ill person
      > were isolated in an Italian hospital," Ms Chaib said,
      > without giving details of in which town or what
      > nationality the possible victims were, or of they were
      > ill.

      So is (misplaced?) withholding of information.
      >
      > http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200504/s1336669.htm
      >
      > Scientists mystified by Puget Sound-area herring
      > decline
      > 3/29/2005, 4:35 a.m. PT
      > The Associated Press
      >
      > TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — A steep decline in Puget
      > Sound-area herring, a critical food source for larger
      > fish, marine mammals and sea birds, has scientists
      > mystified.
      >
      > http://www.oregonlive.com/newsflash/washingtonstate/index.ssf?/base/
      > news-12/1112099625327000.xml&storylist=orwashington<br%20/>

      Technology may be a cause of this one; we don't know.
      >
      > WHY DO SO MANY WOMEN STILL DIE IN PREGNANCY OR
      > CHILDBIRTH (WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION REPORT)
      >
      > Every minute, at least one woman dies from
      > complications related to pregnancy or childbirth -
      > that means 529,000 women a year. In addition, for
      > every woman who dies in childbirth, around 20 more
      > suffer injry, infection or disease - approximately 10
      > million women each year.
      >
      > http://www.who.int/features/qa/12/en/

      I bet a whole lot of this is due to poverty.
      Until technology solves that problem (because I don't
      see there as being the political or social will to
      solve it any other way), problems like death in
      childbirth will continue, because the poor won't have
      access to the technology.

      > Global Outbreak Alert & Response Network (GOARN)
      > http://www.who.int/csr/outbreaknetwork/en/

      "All this technology". Apparently it's the wrong
      technology in the wrong places to abate the progress of
      the disease(s) -- which, as I said, have nothing better
      to do than reproduce and spread.

      Live long and prosper,
      Kennita
      --
      Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;
      none but ourselves can free our minds.
      -- Bob Marley, "Redemption Song"
    • Joschka Fisher
      Dear, dear Kennita: If priority puts faster cpu s ahead of inability to deliver basic healthcare...if stem cell advances proceed 67% of Americans inability to
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 10, 2005
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        Dear, dear Kennita:

        If priority puts faster cpu's ahead of inability to
        deliver basic healthcare...if stem cell advances
        proceed 67% of Americans inability to pay for a basic
        physical in the ER or doctor's office....if this
        Acceleration Conference, which has NEVER specified
        "relative to what?" nor sphere of influence vs. basic
        services of food and water ( q.v. Leonard DeCaprio
        (actor)), American corporations running overseas in
        the name of creativity, but in reality to save a
        dollar and create nothing but bullshit - hence just to
        stay aliv
        e....

        Then some form of triage "for the species" must be
        administered vs. short term profit.

        anderson


        --- Kennita Watson <kennita@...> a écrit :
        > ??? Huh? ???
        >
        > I am truly confused. What are you talking about?
        >
        > Kennita
        >
        > On Apr 10, 2005, at 2:24 PM, Joschka Fisher wrote:
        >
        > > Yea...but what ever happened to triage?
        > >
        > > Lot of good a vacation in Budapest or a new
        > network
        > > is gonna do when you've got a pandemic.
        > >
        > > --- Kennita Watson <kennita@...> a
        > écrit :
        > >>
        > >> Joschka Fisher <grabarkowic@...> wrote:
        > >>> Subject: So...despite all this technology..How
        > >> come disease is making
        > >>> so much progress?
        > >>
        > >> The simple answer is that people have many
        > different
        > >> priorities -- diseases have only one thing to do.
        > >>>
        > >>
        > >>> Now a case is reported in NYState. CWD is a
        > cousin
        > >> of
        > >>> Mad Cow. Suppossedly it doesn't effect humans.
        > >>
        > >> (That's "affect" --- check out both on
        > >> dictionary.com.)
        > >>
        > >>> Marburg haemorrhagic fever in Angola - update 9
        > >>>
        > >>> Mobile surveillance teams in Uige were forced to
        > >>> suspend operations yesterday when vehicles were
        > >>> attacked and damaged by local residents.
        > >>
        > >> Many of those different priorities are counter to
        > >> the
        > >> cause of halting disease.
        > >>
        > >>> WHO staff in Uige were notified today of several
        > >>> fatalities but teams were unable to investigate
        > >> the
        > >>> cause of death or collect the bodies for safe
        > >> burial.
        > >>> Discussions have been held with provincial
        > >> authorities
        > >>> to find urgent solutions.
        > >>>
        > >>> The dramatic symptoms of Marburg haemorrhagic
        > >> fever
        > >>> and its frequent fatality are resulting in a
        > high
        > >>> level of fear, which is further aggravated by a
        > >> lack
        > >>> of public understanding of the disease.
        > >>
        > >> The technology need not be high-tech, just
        > >> ubiquitous,
        > >> such as radios and television, and information
        > needs
        > >> to
        > >> be forthcoming.
        > >>
        > >>> Moreover,
        > >>> because the disease has no cure, hospitalization
        > >> is
        > >>> not associated with a favourable outcome, and
        > >>> confidence in the medical care system has been
        > >> eroded.
        > >>
        > >> PR is also an issue.
        > >>>
        > >>> Public
        > >>> compliance with control measures is not expected
        > >> to
        > >>> improve in the absence of intense campaigns to
        > >> educate
        > >>> the public about the disease ( more data at this
        > >> link
        > >>> http://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_04_08a/en/
        > >>
        > >> So is education.
        > >>
        > >>> "Nine people who were in contact with an ill
        > >> person
        > >>> were isolated in an Italian hospital," Ms Chaib
        > >> said,
        > >>> without giving details of in which town or what
        > >>> nationality the possible victims were, or of
        > they
        > >> were
        > >>> ill.
        > >>
        > >> So is (misplaced?) withholding of information.
        > >>>
        > >>>
        > >>
        > >
        >
        http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200504/s1336669.htm
        > >>>
        > >>> Scientists mystified by Puget Sound-area herring
        > >>> decline
        > >>> 3/29/2005, 4:35 a.m. PT
        > >>> The Associated Press
        > >>>
        > >>> TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — A steep decline in
        Puget
        > >>> Sound-area herring, a critical food source for
        > >> larger
        > >>> fish, marine mammals and sea birds, has
        > scientists
        > >>> mystified.
        > >>>
        > >>>
        > >>
        > >
        >
        http://www.oregonlive.com/newsflash/washingtonstate/index.ssf?/base/
        > >>
        > >>>
        > >>
        > >
        >
        news-12/1112099625327000.xml&storylist=orwashington<br%20/>
        > >>
        > >> Technology may be a cause of this one; we don't
        > >> know.
        > >>>
        > >>> WHY DO SO MANY WOMEN STILL DIE IN PREGNANCY OR
        > >>> CHILDBIRTH (WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION REPORT)
        > >>>
        > >>> Every minute, at least one woman dies from
        > >>> complications related to pregnancy or childbirth
        > -
        > >>> that means 529,000 women a year. In addition,
        > for
        > >>> every woman who dies in childbirth, around 20
        > more
        > >>> suffer injry, infection or disease -
        > approximately
        > >> 10
        > >>> million women each year.
        > >>>
        > >>> http://www.who.int/features/qa/12/en/
        > >>
        > >> I bet a whole lot of this is due to poverty.
        > >> Until technology solves that problem (because I
        > >> don't
        > >> see there as being the political or social will
        > to
        > >> solve it any other way), problems like death in
        > >> childbirth will continue, because the poor won't
        > >> have
        > >> access to the technology.
        > >>
        > >>> Global Outbreak Alert & Response Network (GOARN)
        > >>> http://www.who.int/csr/outbreaknetwork/en/
        > >>
        > >> "All this technology". Apparently it's the wrong
        > >> technology in the wrong places to abate the
        > progress
        > >> of
        > >> the disease(s) -- which, as I said, have nothing
        > >> better
        > >> to do than reproduce and spread.
        > >>
        > >> Live long and prosper,
        > >> Kennita
        > >> --
        > >> Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;
        > >> none but ourselves can free our minds.
        > >> -- Bob Marley, "Redemption Song"
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        > >> --------------------~-->
        > >> Has someone you know been affected by illness or
        > >> disease?
        > >> Network for Good is THE place to support health
        > >> awareness efforts!
        > >>
        > >
        >
        http://us.click.yahoo.com/RzSHvD/UOnJAA/79vVAA/sVPplB/TM
        > >>
        > >
        >
        --------------------------------------------------------------------~->
        > >>
        > >>
        > email
        > >> to:
        > >> bafuture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >>
        >
        === message truncated ===






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      • Kennita Watson
        (I got a private copy of this message, so I sent Joschka a private response. Since he posted his message to the list, I m forwarding my response as well.
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 11, 2005
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          (I got a private copy of this message, so I sent
          Joschka a private response. Since he posted his
          message to the list, I'm forwarding my response
          as well. Much of the prior thread is truncated
          for brevity.)

          Yes it "must". Yell that all you want; reality
          isn't listening. When you're hoarse, and too
          exhausted to be angry any more, think of
          something better to do. A Chinese proverb says
          'Don't curse the darkness - light a candle.'.
          Note that it doesn't say "Tell other people to
          light candles", which would be another form of
          cursing the darkness. In any case, I'm not
          buying into your point of view, but you can vent
          in my general direction for a while if it makes
          you feel better.

          Cheers,
          Kennita

          On Apr 10, 2005, at 10:22 PM, Joschka Fisher wrote:

          > Dear, dear Kennita:
          >
          > If priority puts faster cpu's ahead of inability to
          > deliver basic healthcare...if stem cell advances
          > proceed 67% of Americans inability to pay for a basic
          > physical in the ER or doctor's office....if this
          > Acceleration Conference, which has NEVER specified
          > "relative to what?" nor sphere of influence vs. basic
          > services of food and water ( q.v. Leonard DeCaprio
          > (actor)), American corporations running overseas in
          > the name of creativity, but in reality to save a
          > dollar and create nothing but bullshit - hence just to
          > stay aliv
          > e....
          >
          > Then some form of triage "for the species" must be
          > administered vs. short term profit.
          >
          > anderson
        • Joschka Fisher
          Uh huh! Now get a copy of Dr. Richard Ellis No turning back. Just get through the 1st chapter and you ll see what I mean. I m over at Nasa and it s gonna take
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 11, 2005
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            Uh huh!

            Now get a copy of Dr. Richard Ellis' No turning back.

            Just get through the 1st chapter and you'll see what
            I mean.

            I'm over at Nasa and it's gonna take too long to
            type. Better yet...I'll email ya' with it later
            tonight.

            The short of it is You have no choice we have to do
            something. Anything else is absolute foolishness.

            and if I may invoke Malcom -X ..."By any means
            necessary!"

            --- Kennita Watson <kennita@...> a écrit :
            >
            > (I got a private copy of this message, so I sent
            > Joschka a private response. Since he posted his
            > message to the list, I'm forwarding my response
            > as well. Much of the prior thread is truncated
            > for brevity.)
            >
            > Yes it "must". Yell that all you want; reality
            > isn't listening. When you're hoarse, and too
            > exhausted to be angry any more, think of
            > something better to do. A Chinese proverb says
            > 'Don't curse the darkness - light a candle.'.
            > Note that it doesn't say "Tell other people to
            > light candles", which would be another form of
            > cursing the darkness. In any case, I'm not
            > buying into your point of view, but you can vent
            > in my general direction for a while if it makes
            > you feel better.
            >
            > Cheers,
            > Kennita
            >
            > On Apr 10, 2005, at 10:22 PM, Joschka Fisher wrote:
            >
            > > Dear, dear Kennita:
            > >
            > > If priority puts faster cpu's ahead of inability
            > to
            > > deliver basic healthcare...if stem cell advances
            > > proceed 67% of Americans inability to pay for a
            > basic
            > > physical in the ER or doctor's office....if this
            > > Acceleration Conference, which has NEVER specified
            > > "relative to what?" nor sphere of influence vs.
            > basic
            > > services of food and water ( q.v. Leonard DeCaprio
            > > (actor)), American corporations running overseas
            > in
            > > the name of creativity, but in reality to save a
            > > dollar and create nothing but bullshit - hence
            > just to
            > > stay aliv
            > > e....
            > >
            > > Then some form of triage "for the species" must be
            > > administered vs. short term profit.
            > >
            > > anderson
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            > --------------------~-->
            > In low income neighborhoods, 84% do not own
            > computers.
            > At Network for Good, help bridge the Digital Divide!
            >
            http://us.click.yahoo.com/EA3HyD/3MnJAA/79vVAA/sVPplB/TM
            >
            --------------------------------------------------------------------~->
            >
            >
            > to:
            > bafuture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            > bafuture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >






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          • Joschka Fisher
            from the Extinction Blotter of joschka fischer: Oops Kennita, I forgot. You said in one of your earlier posts ( 4+ months ago ) you weren t a reader.
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 11, 2005
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              from the "Extinction Blotter" of joschka fischer:

              Oops Kennita, I forgot. You said in one of your
              earlier posts ( 4+ months ago ) you weren't a reader.

              OK..here's a summary:

              I supposed, given my last reponse to ya...this makes
              me a cross between the Catcher in the Rye, Malcom-X.
              But some type of vigilence is necessary.

              Here's the review of Dr. Ellis' Book: "No Turning
              Back"

              Editorial Reviews

              Amazon.com
              In No Turning Back, Richard Ellis makes a survey of
              animals that have disappeared through anthropogenic or
              other means. "Everybody knows what extinction is," he
              writes, but theories of why it happens are hampered by
              "the inability of biologists and paleontologists to
              agree on exactly what a species is." Still, Ellis
              manages to pick perfect examples to show how
              extinctions happen in the natural world, and how
              humans unnecessarily contribute to some of them. It's
              hard to look at the careful illustrations of long-gone
              animals such as the Irish elk, Steller's sea cow,
              quagga, or even the dodo, without feeling that the
              world would be better with some of them around. Ellis
              also introduces little-known species currently close
              to extinction, such as the spot-tailed quoll, the
              bilby, and the saiga, to add to the list of well-known
              threatened animals such as the white rhinocerous or
              the orangutan. Ending on an optimistic note, Ellis
              tells how some animals have been brought back from the
              brink of extinction through hard work, careful
              conservation, and lots of money. A master of the
              shocking ecological fact, and a thoroughly accessible
              and engaging narrator of the natural world, Ellis has
              succeeded in explaining extinction and its causes by
              showing readers what there was to love about creatures
              long gone. --Therese Littleton

              From Publishers Weekly
              In his latest book, multitalented marine naturalist
              Ellis (Imagining Atlantis; The Empty Ocean) broadens
              his attention from life in the oceans to an
              examination of the process of animal extinction.
              Readers will be tantalized by brief descriptions of
              many odd species—some extinct, many endangered.
              They will learn about the 50-foot-long megatooth
              shark; the 10-foot-tall duck known as Bullockornis, or
              "the demon duck of doom"; and the tiny leaf deer of
              southeast Asia, so named "because it was small enough
              to wrap its body in a single large leaf." Ellis
              condenses a century of research and postulation into
              one comprehensive volume of extinction; additionally,
              he discusses recently discovered species ("The
              Anti-Extinctions") and offers future
              extinction-prevention techniques ("Rescuing Animals
              from Oblivion"). Even with much compelling material,
              however, the book is not wholly successful. Although
              Ellis presents some fascinating theories (among them,
              he casts doubt on Christianity's placement of "humans
              confidently perched on the top rung" of the animal
              ladder), the text as a whole fails to develop a
              focused message, and lacks the intrigue necessary to
              sustain reader interest throughout. While certainly a
              home run on information, this volume proves only a
              single on entertainment. 70 line drawings.
              Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of
              Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

              From Booklist
              The prolific Ellis normally writes about sea creatures
              (e.g., Aquagenesis, 2001); here he discusses land
              animals, mainly mammals and birds. Adopting an
              encyclopedic approach, Ellis covers the danger of
              extinction, which so many species face today. He
              prefaces the peril with a discourse on the major
              extinction events of the geologic past, touching on
              the exit of the dinosaurs and, more recently, the
              Pleistocene departures of the mammoth and other large
              animals. These sections of the book rely extensively
              on the author's reading, as Ellis liberally
              paraphrases and excerpts popular books such as
              Extinction: Bad Genes or Bad Luck? (1991) by David
              Raup. Ellis' own voice becomes more prominent when he
              turns to mammals and birds that have hovered near, or
              irretrievably crossed into, oblivion in the past
              thousand years. Pouring out his capacious knowledge
              about the appearance and behavior of individual
              species, Ellis elaborates on final sightings or
              contemporary conservation projects, which will despond
              or encourage, according to the species' fate, his
              large, loyal readership. Gilbert Taylor
              Copyright © American Library Association. All rights
              reserved

              From Book News, Inc.
              Ellis, a popular American writer and painter on marine
              natural history, provides a necessarily selective
              account of how species have gone and are going extinct
              during the long life of his home planet, both
              one-by-one and in the great orgies called mass
              extinctions. He also looks at species today that are
              either on or have been pulled back from the
              brink.Copyright © 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

              Booklist
              "Informative, accessible, and just plain fascinating."

              About the Author
              Richard Ellis is recognized as one of America's
              foremost writers and painters on marine natural
              history. Among his many books are The Book of Sharks,
              The Book of Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises, The Search
              for the Giant Squid, Great White Shark, Imagining
              Atlantis, and The Empty Ocean. He lives in New York
              City.

              Product Description:


              A noted naturalist's fascinating inquiry into the life
              and death of animal species

              Just about every species that has ever lived on earth
              is extinct. The trilobites, which dominated the ocean
              floors for 300 million years, are gone. The last of
              the dinosaurs was wiped out by a Mount Everest-sized
              meteorite that slammed into the earth 65 million years
              ago. The great flying reptiles are gone, and so are
              the marine reptiles, some of them larger than a
              humpback whale. Before humans crossed the Bering land
              bridge some 15,000 years ago, North America was
              populated by mastodons, mammoths, saber-toothed
              tigers, and cave bears. They too are MIA. Passenger
              pigeons once flew over North America in flocks that
              numbered in the billions; the last one died in 1914.

              In this book you will meet creatures that were driven
              to extinction even more recently, as well as some that
              were brought back from the brink. You will even
              encounter animals not known to exist until recently --
              an antidote to extinction.


              --- Kennita Watson <kennita@...> a écrit :
              >
              > (I got a private copy of this message, so I sent
              > Joschka a private response. Since he posted his
              > message to the list, I'm forwarding my response
              > as well. Much of the prior thread is truncated
              > for brevity.)
              >
              > Yes it "must". Yell that all you want; reality
              > isn't listening. When you're hoarse, and too
              > exhausted to be angry any more, think of
              > something better to do. A Chinese proverb says
              > 'Don't curse the darkness - light a candle.'.
              > Note that it doesn't say "Tell other people to
              > light candles", which would be another form of
              > cursing the darkness. In any case, I'm not
              > buying into your point of view, but you can vent
              > in my general direction for a while if it makes
              > you feel better.
              >
              > Cheers,
              > Kennita
              >
              > On Apr 10, 2005, at 10:22 PM, Joschka Fisher wrote:
              >
              > > Dear, dear Kennita:
              > >
              > > If priority puts faster cpu's ahead of inability
              > to
              > > deliver basic healthcare...if stem cell advances
              > > proceed 67% of Americans inability to pay for a
              > basic
              > > physical in the ER or doctor's office....if this
              > > Acceleration Conference, which has NEVER specified
              > > "relative to what?" nor sphere of influence vs.
              > basic
              > > services of food and water ( q.v. Leonard DeCaprio
              > > (actor)), American corporations running overseas
              > in
              > > the name of creativity, but in reality to save a
              > > dollar and create nothing but bullshit - hence
              > just to
              > > stay aliv
              > > e....
              > >
              > > Then some form of triage "for the species" must be
              > > administered vs. short term profit.
              > >
              > > anderson
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > --------------------~-->
              > In low income neighborhoods, 84% do not own
              > computers.
              > At Network for Good, help bridge the Digital Divide!
              >
              http://us.click.yahoo.com/EA3HyD/3MnJAA/79vVAA/sVPplB/TM
              >
              --------------------------------------------------------------------~->
              >
              >
              > to:
              > bafuture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              > bafuture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >






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            • Kennita Watson
              Hi Joschka -- I get it that terrible things are happening. You still seem to be missing my point. What candle have you lit? What are you doing to combat
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 11, 2005
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                Hi Joschka -- I get it that terrible things are
                happening. You still seem to be missing my point.
                What candle have you lit? What are you doing to
                combat extinction, and what specifically are you
                hoping to get others to do beyond wailing about
                it with you?

                On Apr 11, 2005, at 11:13 AM, Joschka Fisher wrote:

                > from the "Extinction Blotter" of joschka fischer:
                >
                > Oops Kennita, I forgot. You said in one of your
                > earlier posts ( 4+ months ago ) you weren't a reader.
                >
                > OK..here's a summary:
                >
                > I supposed, given my last reponse to ya...this makes
                > me a cross between the Catcher in the Rye, Malcom-X.
                > But some type of vigilence is necessary.
                >
                > Here's the review of Dr. Ellis' Book: "No Turning
                > Back"
                >
                > Editorial Reviews
                >
                > Amazon.com
                > In No Turning Back, Richard Ellis makes a survey of
                > animals that have disappeared through anthropogenic or
                > other means. "Everybody knows what extinction is," he
                > writes, but theories of why it happens are hampered by
                > "the inability of biologists and paleontologists to
                > agree on exactly what a species is." Still, Ellis
                > manages to pick perfect examples to show how
                > extinctions happen in the natural world, and how
                > humans unnecessarily contribute to some of them. It's
                > hard to look at the careful illustrations of long-gone
                > animals such as the Irish elk, Steller's sea cow,
                > quagga, or even the dodo, without feeling that the
                > world would be better with some of them around. Ellis
                > also introduces little-known species currently close
                > to extinction, such as the spot-tailed quoll, the
                > bilby, and the saiga, to add to the list of well-known
                > threatened animals such as the white rhinocerous or
                > the orangutan. Ending on an optimistic note, Ellis
                > tells how some animals have been brought back from the
                > brink of extinction through hard work, careful
                > conservation, and lots of money. A master of the
                > shocking ecological fact, and a thoroughly accessible
                > and engaging narrator of the natural world, Ellis has
                > succeeded in explaining extinction and its causes by
                > showing readers what there was to love about creatures
                > long gone. --Therese Littleton
                >
                > From Publishers Weekly
                > In his latest book, multitalented marine naturalist
                > Ellis (Imagining Atlantis; The Empty Ocean) broadens
                > his attention from life in the oceans to an
                > examination of the process of animal extinction.
                > Readers will be tantalized by brief descriptions of
                > many odd species—some extinct, many endangered.
                > They will learn about the 50-foot-long megatooth
                > shark; the 10-foot-tall duck known as Bullockornis, or
                > "the demon duck of doom"; and the tiny leaf deer of
                > southeast Asia, so named "because it was small enough
                > to wrap its body in a single large leaf." Ellis
                > condenses a century of research and postulation into
                > one comprehensive volume of extinction; additionally,
                > he discusses recently discovered species ("The
                > Anti-Extinctions") and offers future
                > extinction-prevention techniques ("Rescuing Animals
                > from Oblivion"). Even with much compelling material,
                > however, the book is not wholly successful. Although
                > Ellis presents some fascinating theories (among them,
                > he casts doubt on Christianity's placement of "humans
                > confidently perched on the top rung" of the animal
                > ladder), the text as a whole fails to develop a
                > focused message, and lacks the intrigue necessary to
                > sustain reader interest throughout. While certainly a
                > home run on information, this volume proves only a
                > single on entertainment. 70 line drawings.
                > Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of
                > Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
                >
                > From Booklist
                > The prolific Ellis normally writes about sea creatures
                > (e.g., Aquagenesis, 2001); here he discusses land
                > animals, mainly mammals and birds. Adopting an
                > encyclopedic approach, Ellis covers the danger of
                > extinction, which so many species face today. He
                > prefaces the peril with a discourse on the major
                > extinction events of the geologic past, touching on
                > the exit of the dinosaurs and, more recently, the
                > Pleistocene departures of the mammoth and other large
                > animals. These sections of the book rely extensively
                > on the author's reading, as Ellis liberally
                > paraphrases and excerpts popular books such as
                > Extinction: Bad Genes or Bad Luck? (1991) by David
                > Raup. Ellis' own voice becomes more prominent when he
                > turns to mammals and birds that have hovered near, or
                > irretrievably crossed into, oblivion in the past
                > thousand years. Pouring out his capacious knowledge
                > about the appearance and behavior of individual
                > species, Ellis elaborates on final sightings or
                > contemporary conservation projects, which will despond
                > or encourage, according to the species' fate, his
                > large, loyal readership. Gilbert Taylor
                > Copyright © American Library Association. All rights
                > reserved
                >
                > From Book News, Inc.
                > Ellis, a popular American writer and painter on marine
                > natural history, provides a necessarily selective
                > account of how species have gone and are going extinct
                > during the long life of his home planet, both
                > one-by-one and in the great orgies called mass
                > extinctions. He also looks at species today that are
                > either on or have been pulled back from the
                > brink.Copyright © 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
                >
                > Booklist
                > "Informative, accessible, and just plain fascinating."
                >
                > About the Author
                > Richard Ellis is recognized as one of America's
                > foremost writers and painters on marine natural
                > history. Among his many books are The Book of Sharks,
                > The Book of Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises, The Search
                > for the Giant Squid, Great White Shark, Imagining
                > Atlantis, and The Empty Ocean. He lives in New York
                > City.
                >
                > Product Description:
                >
                >
                > A noted naturalist's fascinating inquiry into the life
                > and death of animal species
                >
                > Just about every species that has ever lived on earth
                > is extinct. The trilobites, which dominated the ocean
                > floors for 300 million years, are gone. The last of
                > the dinosaurs was wiped out by a Mount Everest-sized
                > meteorite that slammed into the earth 65 million years
                > ago. The great flying reptiles are gone, and so are
                > the marine reptiles, some of them larger than a
                > humpback whale. Before humans crossed the Bering land
                > bridge some 15,000 years ago, North America was
                > populated by mastodons, mammoths, saber-toothed
                > tigers, and cave bears. They too are MIA. Passenger
                > pigeons once flew over North America in flocks that
                > numbered in the billions; the last one died in 1914.
                >
                > In this book you will meet creatures that were driven
                > to extinction even more recently, as well as some that
                > were brought back from the brink. You will even
                > encounter animals not known to exist until recently --
                > an antidote to extinction.
                >
                >
                > --- Kennita Watson <kennita@...> a écrit :
                >>
                >> (I got a private copy of this message, so I sent
                >> Joschka a private response. Since he posted his
                >> message to the list, I'm forwarding my response
                >> as well. Much of the prior thread is truncated
                >> for brevity.)
                >>
                >> Yes it "must". Yell that all you want; reality
                >> isn't listening. When you're hoarse, and too
                >> exhausted to be angry any more, think of
                >> something better to do. A Chinese proverb says
                >> 'Don't curse the darkness - light a candle.'.
                >> Note that it doesn't say "Tell other people to
                >> light candles", which would be another form of
                >> cursing the darkness. In any case, I'm not
                >> buying into your point of view, but you can vent
                >> in my general direction for a while if it makes
                >> you feel better.
                >>
                >> Cheers,
                >> Kennita
                >>
                >> On Apr 10, 2005, at 10:22 PM, Joschka Fisher wrote:
                >>
                >>> Dear, dear Kennita:
                >>>
                >>> If priority puts faster cpu's ahead of inability
                >> to
                >>> deliver basic healthcare...if stem cell advances
                >>> proceed 67% of Americans inability to pay for a
                >> basic
                >>> physical in the ER or doctor's office....if this
                >>> Acceleration Conference, which has NEVER specified
                >>> "relative to what?" nor sphere of influence vs.
                >> basic
                >>> services of food and water ( q.v. Leonard DeCaprio
                >>> (actor)), American corporations running overseas
                >> in
                >>> the name of creativity, but in reality to save a
                >>> dollar and create nothing but bullshit - hence
                >> just to
                >>> stay aliv
                >>> e....
                >>>
                >>> Then some form of triage "for the species" must be
                >>> administered vs. short term profit.
                >>>
                >>> anderson
              • Alan Patrick
                I think there are 2 issues: 1. There has been a buildup of complacency in rich western countries since WW2 that the killer diseases of an earlier era were
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 12, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  I think there are 2 issues:

                  1. There has been a buildup of complacency in rich western countries since
                  WW2 that the killer diseases of an earlier era were licked, but they are
                  always evolving new strains. Also, we (i) over-medicate - allowing these
                  diseases to build resistance to our current medications, and (ii) over-clean
                  our houses & selves, stopping our bodies from building resistance.

                  2. There is no money for Big Pharma in solving the diseases of the poor.
                  Their economics make it more sensible to manufacture Viagra for the US
                  cheaply in places like Angola, than to actually solve Angolan
                  diseases.....the way Angola gets an antidote to Marburg is to infect enough
                  Americans.....

                  Rgds

                  Alan
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