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Re: dogs and kids on trails

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  • autumn
    our dog presents as menacing. she s 100+ lbs. chesapeake bay retriever. she is a cupcake, a total sweet heart. as her owners, we know this, but someone seeing
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 2, 2004
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      our dog presents as menacing.

      she's 100+ lbs. chesapeake bay retriever. she is a cupcake, a total sweet heart. as her
      owners, we know this, but someone seeing her for the first time, especially someone who
      is not chummy with dogs, would probably be afraid of her. for people who aren't familiar
      with her breed, she looks like a oversized, scruffy golden or chocolate lab with a bark like
      a saint bernard.

      if someone shot her, i would be broken hearted...but if someone's dog looked at my
      children the wrong way, my maternal instinct would kick in. therefor, i can understand why
      things like this happen. its like bryson says in 'walk in the woods' - not all dogs attack, but
      here's the thing - sometimes they do.

      it is the responsibility of the owner to keep the dog under control at all times. we use two
      leashes on greta...one longer, and one very short.
    • Erskine Fincher
      I have friends who really love Chesapeake Bay retrievers. They ve owned several over the years. Some of them have been more laid back than others, but
      Message 2 of 13 , Apr 3, 2004
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        I have friends who really love Chesapeake Bay
        retrievers. They've owned several over the years. Some
        of them have been more laid back than others, but
        generally they have seemed to me to be very
        aggressive, territorial and protective of their
        'pack'. They can be very intimidating dogs, and at
        least one of the ones my friends owned was known to
        bite strangers who came into the house, even though
        they had been introduced. On the other hand, they're
        very intelligent and very loving towards their owners,
        and anyone who has been accepted as part of the
        household. They make a very good example of a type of
        dog that needs to be kept under control, though, and
        one that it's very easy for owners to develop a blind
        spot about. It's good that you understand how your dog
        appears to other people, and the potential for
        situations to develop where her intentions might be
        misunderstood.

        We have a beagle/walker mix. You couldn't ask for a
        more sweet and loving dog. She instantly befriends
        every person, dog, and even cat, that she meets. What
        she considers loving, though, isn't always appreciated
        by the recipients. She wants to jump on people, climb
        up in their laps, paw them, and sniff them in
        sensitive areas. It's dog-loving and people and cats
        don't necessarily like it. Small children can get hurt
        by it. So even friendly, loving dogs need to be
        restrained.

        While I was camping with my daughter (age 7) a couple
        of months ago we met a group of guys who had a yellow
        lab with them--not on a leash. She was a typical lab:
        an over-friendly, stick-chasing, dumb blonde. She
        mistook my daughter's stuffed tiger for a chew toy,
        though, and almost knocked her down trying to take it
        away from her. It took several minutes for the owner
        to get her under control while the dog was terrifying
        my daughter, chasing her and biting at her tiger. A
        dog that's friendly, and would never intentionally
        hurt anyone can still do unintentional harm if not
        properly restrained.

        All that is just to reiterate what everyone else is
        saying: no matter how nice your dog is, keep it under
        control when you go out in public.

        --- autumn <mama@...> wrote:
        > our dog presents as menacing.
        >
        > she's 100+ lbs. chesapeake bay retriever. she is a
        > cupcake, a total sweet heart. as her
        > owners, we know this, but someone seeing her for the
        > first time, especially someone who
        > is not chummy with dogs, would probably be afraid of
        > her. for people who aren't familiar
        > with her breed, she looks like a oversized, scruffy
        > golden or chocolate lab with a bark like
        > a saint bernard.
        >
        > if someone shot her, i would be broken hearted...but
        > if someone's dog looked at my
        > children the wrong way, my maternal instinct would
        > kick in. therefor, i can understand why
        > things like this happen. its like bryson says in
        > 'walk in the woods' - not all dogs attack, but
        > here's the thing - sometimes they do.
        >
        > it is the responsibility of the owner to keep the
        > dog under control at all times. we use two
        > leashes on greta...one longer, and one very short.
        >
        >
        >


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