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Re: Big Sky Country!

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  • mcmurfy1
    Hey! have a great trip. I spent a summer in Montana working back in the early 70s (live in Helena) - really like it there and I ve visited Glacier National
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 3, 2002
      Hey! have a great trip. I spent a summer in Montana working back in
      the early 70s (live in Helena) - really like it there and I've
      visited Glacier National Park twice in the 70s but haven't been able
      to get back. I have some local friends that go backpacking up there
      though although I'm very leary of the grizzlies myself and not sure I
      would want too. It is probably the most beautiful park that I have
      ever been in - have a poster on the wall behind me with a picture
      from within GNP.

      --- In backpackingwithchildren@y..., emma eyeball <tarbubble@y...>
      wrote:
      > baby Paul & i are going to Montana! my
      > great-grandparents settled there around 1906 & we have
      > an old family cabin on Flathead Lake. my parents
      > talked me into going with them & i hope to take wee
      > Paul on a dayhike or two while we're there - maybe
      > even our first overnighter if i can talk Mr. Eyeball
      > into it (he has his heart set on relaxation). i'm
      > thinking maybe in Glacier NP, as we'll be 2 hours away
      > from it. but there are grizzly bears in GNP (eek!),
      > so i'll have to get my ursophobia under control.
      >
      > BTW, Paul weighed in at just over 10 lbs. yesterday &
      > 21.5 inches long. his Dr. says that's slightly above
      > average for a 1-month old baby (Paul's corrected age),
      > so i don't have to worry any more about Paul lagging
      > behind in size. hooray!
      >
      > off to plan & dream,
      >
      > -emma
      >
      > p.s. Sloe, how did everything go with your last-minute
      > preparations? let us know when you get back, and tell
      > us ALL about the hike! i'm so encouraged by your
      > sons, they are a great inspiration to me.
      >
      >
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    • emma eyeball
      here s the situation: the 2nd weekend in Sept., my hubby is going on a 3-day backpacking trip with some of his co-workers. when he mentioned it to me, i
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 8, 2002

        here's the situation:  the 2nd weekend in Sept., my hubby is going on a 3-day backpacking trip with some of his co-workers.  when he mentioned it to me, i assumed baby & i were welcome as well, but it turns out that these macho men want a "no wives" weekend.  fair enough, i understand.

        so i decided that if Other Half was going to be away, i may as well have some fun, too.  i'm planning on having a little 4-day trip to one of the nearby national parks (i just bought my annual parks pass!), where i'll car camp with baby Paul (who will be 2.5 months by then) and just do some dayhiking & sightseeing.  no big deal, in my mind.

        BUT my father, who isn't normally the worrywart type, strongly believes i shouldn't go alone.  i'm not such a daddy's girl that i can't ignore his advice when i want, but this time he is really emphatic in his request that i not do this.  he mentioned the loony that killed 3 women in Yosemite a few years back.  i reminded him that he didn't worry the last time i went on a trip by myself, but he thinks the baby makes me more vulnerable.  i think that it's unlikely i'll ever be in ANY real danger.  i would be happy to go with someone, but i have NO outdoorsy friends who live anywhere nearby.

        so am i being too cavalier, or is my dad being overprotective?  my husband has no such fears for me, but i find sometimes an outside perspective is best.  you all know the outdoors life, so i'm appealing to your wise judgement.

        -emma



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      • mcmurfy1
        I would say go for it Emma! My wife doesn t backpack and I have both male and female friends who have spouses that are not interested in backpacking or just
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 11, 2002
          I would say go for it Emma!

          My wife doesn't backpack and I have both male and female friends who
          have spouses that are not interested in backpacking or just not
          physical able so we get together for hiking and backpacking here in
          MO throughout the year without our spouses.

          --- In backpackingwithchildren@y..., emma eyeball <tarbubble@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > here's the situation: the 2nd weekend in Sept., my hubby is going
          on a 3-day backpacking trip with some of his co-workers. when he
          mentioned it to me, i assumed baby & i were welcome as well, but it
          turns out that these macho men want a "no wives" weekend. fair
          enough, i understand.
          > so i decided that if Other Half was going to be away, i may as well
          have some fun, too. i'm planning on having a little 4-day trip to
          one of the nearby national parks (i just bought my annual parks
          pass!), where i'll car camp with baby Paul (who will be 2.5 months by
          then) and just do some dayhiking & sightseeing. no big deal, in my
          mind.
          > BUT my father, who isn't normally the worrywart type, strongly
          believes i shouldn't go alone. i'm not such a daddy's girl that i
          can't ignore his advice when i want, but this time he is really
          emphatic in his request that i not do this. he mentioned the loony
          that killed 3 women in Yosemite a few years back. i reminded him
          that he didn't worry the last time i went on a trip by myself, but he
          thinks the baby makes me more vulnerable. i think that it's unlikely
          i'll ever be in ANY real danger. i would be happy to go with
          someone, but i have NO outdoorsy friends who live anywhere nearby.
          > so am i being too cavalier, or is my dad being overprotective? my
          husband has no such fears for me, but i find sometimes an outside
          perspective is best. you all know the outdoors life, so i'm
          appealing to your wise judgement.
          > -emma
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
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        • Sloetoe
          emma, I m only just back from doing VT/NH on the AT with my 8 year old twins, so I m a bit late in replying. (You posted this on August 8, I think; we d just
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 23, 2002
            emma, I'm only just back from doing VT/NH on the AT with my 8
            year old twins, so I'm a bit late in replying. (You posted this
            on August 8, I think; we'd just hit the bottom of the White
            Mtns. It was really hot, but I'll tell you (all) how hot later.)

            Anywho, and in serious answer to your question, you and Baby
            Paul are much more likely to be killed in your car on your way
            out to grab a gallon of milk and a loaf of bread tonight "in the
            city", than to have *any* harm come to *either* of you whilst in
            the woods. But that empirical reality to too easy to ignore, and
            too impossible to affect with rational action, for any of us to
            handle. So we latch on to the unreal fears.

            I'm on an Appalachian Trail list, the "at-l". There is a
            particular lister there who regularly trots out 'hikers cooking
            in tents all too often end up in burn units' line -- I object
            strongly. The *reality* is that a) people are not out there
            lighting up the woods with their tents, BUT MORE IMPORTANT b)
            the REAL danger is from the open flames we all have our
            synthetic-clad limbs within inches of, when we reach over to
            stir our pots, add ingediants, adjust the stove, relight the
            stove, etc. Outside of regular good scaldings that just *don't*
            make the same story-telling splash (so to speak) as burns, the
            real danger in cooking is in lighting one's limbs on fire --
            whether we are in a tent, on a porch, a cliff, whatever.

            Two weeks after I last bitched the guy out for diluting and
            distracting from REAL danger (the guy's an MD and should now
            better about public health), he lit his arm on fire in a stove
            accident. But he still sings the same tune. Even as an object
            lesson in what *not* to do, he still feels the need to distract
            and dilute a *real* warning for a false one.

            Your dad (or any of our relatives -- we all have 'em, and we
            know they're gonna say stuff about us taking kiddies in the
            woods) may just be ignorant of the facts, or had not considered
            that the most dangerous part of the trip is the trip to get out
            there, or that golf claims more deaths from lightning than any
            hiking trail, or dogs kill many more persons than sharks, or...
            etc.... But if you can wake him up, you can perhaps even earn
            encouragement and respect. Either way, we must all keep our eye
            on *real* dangers: the out-of-doors in no way cares whether our
            attention is taken up by false dangers, and it will bang our
            heads and kick our butts if we make choices that recognize
            social convention over mountain sense. And as we're on a "with
            kids" list, this generally means our kids pay the price, too.
            Yow.

            (OK, done preaching!)
            Sloetoe

            --- emma eyeball <tarbubble@...> wrote:
            >
            > here's the situation: the 2nd weekend in Sept., my hubby is
            > going on a 3-day backpacking trip with some of his co-workers.
            > when he mentioned it to me, i assumed baby & i were welcome
            > as well, but it turns out that these macho men want a "no
            > wives" weekend. fair enough, i understand.
            > so i decided that if Other Half was going to be away, i may as
            > well have some fun, too. i'm planning on having a little
            > 4-day trip to one of the nearby national parks (i just bought
            > my annual parks pass!), where i'll car camp with baby Paul
            > (who will be 2.5 months by then) and just do some dayhiking &
            > sightseeing. no big deal, in my mind.
            > BUT my father, who isn't normally the worrywart type, strongly
            > believes i shouldn't go alone. i'm not such a daddy's girl
            > that i can't ignore his advice when i want, but this time he
            > is really emphatic in his request that i not do this. he
            > mentioned the loony that killed 3 women in Yosemite a few
            > years back. i reminded him that he didn't worry the last time
            > i went on a trip by myself, but he thinks the baby makes me
            > more vulnerable. i think that it's unlikely i'll ever be in
            > ANY real danger. i would be happy to go with someone, but i
            > have NO outdoorsy friends who live anywhere nearby.
            > so am i being too cavalier, or is my dad being overprotective?
            > my husband has no such fears for me, but i find sometimes an
            > outside perspective is best. you all know the outdoors life,
            > so i'm appealing to your wise judgement.
            > -emma

            =====
            Spatior! Nitor! Nitor! Tempero!
            Pro Pondera Et Meliora.

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