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FR - REI Half Dome 2 Tent - Mike Mosack

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  • scoutmaster1006
    Hello! Here is my FR on the REI Half Dome 2 tent. I await your edits and comments. Mike http://tinyurl.com/mfz4nfj http://tinyurl.com/mfz4nfj FIELD LOCATIONS
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 4, 2014
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      Hello!

      Here is my FR on the REI Half Dome 2 tent. I await your edits and comments.

      Mike


      http://tinyurl.com/mfz4nfj


      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
       
      Location #1 - El Capitan Mountain area, Eastern San Diego County in Southern California.
      Conditions: Foot trails and rocky outcroppings.
      Temperatures ranging from 38 to 75 F (3 to 24 C).
      Duration: Two overnight trips

      Location #2 - Pacific Crest Trail section in Laguna Mountain region of Southern California, Cleveland National Forest, USA
      Conditions: Ungroomed foot trails and forest access dirt roads.
      Temperatures ranging from 30 to 75 F (-1 to 24 C)
      Duration: 3 days
       
      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
       
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 9"  IMAGE CAPTION = "My little apartment">>
      I felt like I was in a studio apartment being by myself inside this tent. Lots of interior room without a large footprint. The rectangle-shaped floor gives equal space to two people. I can sleep with my head at either end and have same head/foot room. I really like this aspect as I sometimes change the direction I sleep in depending upon the terrain and/or scenery.

      After only doing one practice set up of the tent at home before taking it out, the tent was very easy and quick to set up in the field. Lots of ventilation. The mostly screened roof eliminated any overnight condensation I sometimes get with my other tents. Another thing I like about having a free-standing tent is that I often do not need to use the provided stakes. Once I am in the tent, it usually isn't going anywhere. During the entire test of this tent, I'll carry and use the stakes, but after that, I'll either not carry them at all or will carry just a couple to aid in guying out the rain fly only. I am not an ultralight backpacker yet, but I try to reduce obviously unnecessary weight where I can. Leaving the "extra" stakes at home will be an easy weight savings later on.

      I like the ease of securing the rain fly and tent door in the open position. I've included a photo of the locking device below. It works much like a button into a button hole with an added slide-tension feature as well. It is quick and easy to lock or unlock and I can adjust the tension as necessary.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 8">>
      The stakes that come with this tent are standard "J" hook shaped aluminum. They work well and go into most types of ground. The stakes are strong enough to be pounded into harder ground and the "J" hook top enables me to pull the stake out relatively easily.

      The screened roof is almost as clear as glass when looking up through it under a starry night. It is very cool to have a room with a view. The rain fly is not clear so the view is restricted if using that over the tent body. I like sleeping under the stars, but hate the bugs and little creepy-crawlies that visit or land on my face when I'm trying to sleep so having a screened roof like this is great.
       
      OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT
       
      There is an optional footprint that can be purchased separately for this tent. I have gotten one. For those who are unfamiliar with what a footprint is, it is basically a ground cloth that attaches directly to the tent poles securely. The footprint can be used under the floor of the tent body to protect the tent floor. This tent can also be set up with just the footprint and rain fly using the poles for structure.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 10"  IMAGE CAPTION = "Minimalist setup">>
      The benefit of having this option is a minimalist setup. For the benefit of taking a clear photo (above) I have removed all my stuff from inside the tent. When I'm looking for lighter weight and less bulk in my pack I have the option of leaving the entire tent body at home. I just turned 50 years old so going lighter is something I have been exploring more and more. I also like my creature comforts, so achieving the label of ultralight backpacker is not really on my bucket list. I certainly plan to continue using this tent this way when I can and I wish the footprint was an included item and not something I have to buy separately.
       
      SUMMARY
       
      I have yet to find anything negative to write about. So far, I am quite happy with this tent. Some of the positives are that it has a crazy amount of room inside yet it takes up very little space on the ground. I can set this tent up about anywhere. Since it is free standing, I do not absolutely need stakes but they help in staking out the rain fly. It is rare in my experience that I would need to have a full set of stakes when setting up a tent. I prefer to use its freestanding ability to just let my gear and my weight hold down the tent in all but the worse storms.  The interior height in this tent allows me to sit straight up and move around easily inside. The fact that this tent has a rectangular floor allows two people to have equal space at both the head and foot. The opposing and equally sized space under the rain fly allows two of us to store our gear next to our own door. This makes getting up in the middle of the night a breeze and I don't bother my tent partner and I can enter and leave through my side of the tent.

      I would like to thank both <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.rei.com" LINK TEXT = "REI">> and <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.backpackgeartest.org" LINK TEXT = "BackpackGearTest.org">> for allowing me to participate in this test. Please check back in about two months for my Long Term Report.
       
      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2014.  All rights reserved.

    • rayestrella1
      Hi Mike, I know the areas well that you have used the tent. I miss them a lot. (It is -27 here) Just a few edits for you and you are good to go. See you in a
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 7, 2014
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        Hi Mike,

         

        I know the areas well that you have used the tent. I miss them a lot. (It is -27 here) Just a few edits for you and you are good to go. See you in a couple months,

         

        Ray

         


        ***Another thing I like about having a free-standing tent is that I often do not need to use the provided stakes.

         

        Edit: what was the first thing?  Since you never mentioned the freestanding aspect earlier you should drop the word “another” for something like “one thing”.

         

         

        ***Since it is free standing, I do not absolutely need stakes but they help in staking out the rain fly.

         

        EDIT: free-standing

         



        **I prefer to use its freestanding ability to just let my gear and my weight hold down the tent in all but the worse storms.

         

        EDIT: free-standing

      • Mike Mosack
        Thanks Ray - I’ve addressed the edits and posted the report and deleted the test file copy as well. See you in a couple months. Mike From:
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 7, 2014
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          Thanks Ray -
          I’ve addressed the edits and posted the report and deleted the test file copy as well.
          See you in a couple months.
          Mike
           
          Sent: Tuesday, January 07, 2014 5:18 AM
          Subject: [backpackgeartesters] Edit: FR - REI Half Dome 2 Tent - Mike Mosack
           
           

          Hi Mike,

          I know the areas well that you have used the tent. I miss them a lot. (It is -27 here) Just a few edits for you and you are good to go. See you in a couple months,

          Ray

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