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IR - Slumberjack Trail Tent 6 - Brian Hartman

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  • Brian Hartman
    Hi Nancy, Below is my Initial Report for the Slumberjack Trail Tent 6. The link to my HTML report is
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 18, 2013
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      Hi Nancy,
      Below is my Initial Report for the Slumberjack Trail Tent 6. The link to my HTML report is http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/IR%20-%20Slumberjack%20Trail%20Tent%206%20-%20Brian%20Hartman/
       
       
      Thanks,
      Brian
       
      INITIAL REPORT
          
      PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS
       
      <<IMAGE 1>>
      Manufacturer: Slumberjack
      Year of Manufacture: 2013
      Manufacturer's Website: <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.slumberjack.com/">>
      MSRP: US $219.95
      Listed Weight: 18 lbs 6 oz (8.4 kg)
      Measured Weight: 19 lbs (8.6 kg)
       
      Other details: <<IMAGE 2>>
      Capacity: 6 Person
      Seasons: 3 Season
      Number of Poles: 4
      Number of Doors: 2
      Number of Vestibules: 2
      Dimensions: 130 x 110 x 70 in (330 x 279 x 178 cm)
      Floor Area: 99.3 ft2 (9.2 m2)
      Vestibule Area: 2 x 27.7 ft2 (2 x 2.6 m2)
      Packed Size: 8 x 28 in (20 x 71 cm)
      Wall Material: 75D Polyester No-See-Um Mesh
      Floor Material: 75D Polyester 1200 mm
      Fly Material: 75D Polyester 1200 mm
      Pole Type: Fiberglass
       
      Tent features (as provided by manufacturer)
      Color-coded clip construction for a fast and easy setup
      Mesh wall panels for optimum ventilation
      Internal storage pockets to keep essentials handy
      Waterproof, taped seams
      Noiseless zipper pulls
      Guyout points
      Convenient free-standing construction
      Ridge pole geometry for maximum interior space
      Full-coverage rain fly for a dry overnight experience
      Convenient dual-entry design
      Quick and easy side-release buckle tent-fly connection
       
      INITIAL IMPRESSIONS
       
      The Slumberjack Trail Tent 6 (hereafter called the Slumberjack or Trail Tent 6) is a 6 person 3 season tent described by the manufacturer as "perfect for any backpacking, fishing or family camping adventure."  The Trail Tent 6 is the largest of Slumberjack's Trail Series tents which feature quick and easy set-up, comfortable, spacious interiors and durable, all-weather construction.
       
      The Trail Tent 6 arrived in a generously sized storage sack.  Contents included the following items: <<IMAGE 3>>
       
      Tent body and rainfly
      2 main poles and 2 ridge poles
      12 aluminum stakes with small storage sack
      4 guylines with tighteners
      1 pole sack
      1 storage sack
      1 page user manual with care and pitching instructions
       
      Materials and Construction: As I examined the Trail Tent 6 on my family room floor, I found it to be well constructed with no loose seems or wavy stitching.  The vital seams on the fly and tent body were taped at the factory to ensure a dry interior.  In addition, the tent body features a bathtub style floor with 6 in (15.2 cm) sidewalls to prevent flooding during heavy rains.
       
      The tent floor and rain fly are made of 75D Polyester fabric with a 1200mm waterproof coating.  In contrast, the wall panels are made of polyester mesh to maximize air flow inside the tent.  The two main poles run diagonally across the tent, crossing over each other at the top of the tent in what Slumberjack refers to as an 'X' frame geometry.  The poles are held in place by pole sleeves, which help secure them and prevent them from moving.  At the bottom of the tent, the main poles are secured in grommets which are located on the stake loops at the four corners of the tent.  In addition to the main poles, two ridge poles run parallel to each other near the top of the tent, helping to create steep sidewalls for added interior space and headroom.  The ridge poles also add significant strength and rigidity to the tent.  All four poles are fiberglass with shockcords holding their sections together.  Finally, the tent body clips attach to the main poles, lifting the tent walls and creating the tent's dome shape profile.  Below are two photos of the tent with the rain fly removed to show how the tent poles are arranged.
       
      <<IMAGE 4>> <<IMAGE 5>>
      The tent comes with twelve steel pegs.  The pegs are 8 in (20 cm) long and are packed in a small sack along with four guylines.  The fly, tent, poles and pegs fit into a nylon storage sack with dimensions of 8 x 28 in (20 x 71 cm).  Setup instructions are printed on one side of an 8 x 11 in (20 x 28 cm) sheet of paper which I found inside the storage sack.  Care instructions and warranty/repair information are written on the backside of this sheet.
       
      The Slumberjack features two large polyester mesh doors which allow easy access to its large interior, measuring almost 100 ft2 (9.5 m2).  The doors are so large in fact that a full-size inflatable air mattress would fit through the opening.  Once inside the tent there are four mesh storage pockets located near the four corners of the tent.  The pockets measure approx 6  x 18 in (15 x 46 cm).  They offer plenty of storage for electronics, watches, glasses, flashlights and any other items that might otherwise get lost or stepped on.  Since the tent walls are entirely mesh, Slumberjack provides a full coverage rain fly that extends almost to the ground.  When the rain fly is attached, it creates two small vestibules at the front and back of the tent with dimensions of 24 x 30 inches (61 x 76 cm).  The following three photos show a) the interior of the tent, b) the storage pockets and c) the full coverage rain fly.
       
      <<IMAGE 6>><<IMAGE 7>><<IMAGE 8>>
       
      TRYING IT OUT
       
      The Trail Tent 6 was a breeze to set up in my backyard (literally - as I'll explain in a minute).  It took me roughly nine minutes to pitch the tent and attach the rain fly.  In particular, I found it very easy to stake out the tent body, insert the poles into the tent grommets, clip the tent walls to the main poles and attach the fly to the tent via the quick-connect buckles.  Things would have gone even quicker with a second person helping, especially the tasks of raising the two main poles and getting the fly over the top of the tent.  These tasks were difficult to accomplish by myself simply because the main poles are 20+ ft (6 m) in length and the tent stands close to 6 ft (1.8 m) tall.
       
      Once the tent was erected I staked out the four corners and went back inside my house to get a camera so I could take some photos for this report.  To my surprise, when I came back outside only a few minutes later the tent was nowhere to be seen.  After staring for a few seconds in disbelief at the empty spot where the tent used to be, I ran to the back of my yard and looked up and down our tree row.  Off in the distance I could see the Trail Tent 6, on its side and wedged against the trunk of a large Walnut tree.  Granted, it was little windy outside; but I'd set up my backpacking tents in my backyard dozens of times and never had this happen.  What I failed to consider at the time was that my other tents are much more streamlined and shorter in height than the Trail Tent 6.  Mental note: the profile of the Slumberjack is much larger than my backpacking tents and will catch wind like a sail if not properly secured with guylines.  It took a while for me to get the tent separated from the tree but luckily there were no rips in the tent or rain fly and none of the poles had broken.
       
      Slumberjack has incorporated a lot of nice features into this tent including steep sidewalls for plenty of headroom, large entry doors, lots of storage pockets and factory taped seams.  So far my only wish is that the vestibules were larger.  This would allow more items to be stored outside the tent while still being protected from the elements.  Needless to say, I am looking forward to the next four months of backpacking with this tent.
       
      SUMMARY
       
      What I like:
      Lots of interior space and plenty of headroom
      Simple design makes for fast set up
      Bathtub floors
      Large doors allow plenty of room to get stuff into and out of the tent
      Plenty of storage pockets to keep stuff organized and off the floor
      Mesh walls so air circulation and condensation shouldn't be a problem
       
      What I don't like:
      Vestibules could be larger
       
      I have high hopes for the Slumberjack Trail Tent 6.  It has all of the makings for a great family tent.  It is large, well designed, easy to pitch and appears to be very sturdy.
       
      This concludes my Initial Report for the Trail Tent 6.  I will post a Field Report in approximately two months so please check back then for further information.  In the meantime I would like to thank Slumberjack and BackpackGearTest.org for providing me with the opportunity to test this tent.
       
       
       
      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2013.  All rights reserved.
    • Nancy Griffith
      Hi Brian,   Nice report!  It cracks me up that your tent blew away.  I d love to see the look on your face when you came back outside. :)   Just one easy
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 21, 2013
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        Hi Brian,
         
        Nice report!  It cracks me up that your tent blew away.  I'd love to see the look on your face when you came back outside. :)
         
        Just one easy edit so please upload when ready and remember to delete your test file.
         
        Enjoy your fall family camping trips. 'See' you in a few months.
         
        Nancy
         
         >>Off in the distance I could see the Trail Tent 6, on its side and wedged against the trunk of a large Walnut tree. 
        EDIT: walnut (no capital)
         
          .
      • Brian Hartman
        Thanks for the edits, Nancy. See you in a few months.   Brain ________________________________ From: Nancy Griffith To:
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 23, 2013
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          Thanks for the edits, Nancy.
          See you in a few months.
           
          Brain

          From: Nancy Griffith <bkpkrgirl@...>
          To: "backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com" <backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com>; "bhart1426@..." <bhart1426@...>
          Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2013 3:54 PM
          Subject: EDIT: [backpackgeartesters] IR - Slumberjack Trail Tent 6 - Brian Hartman
           
          Hi Brian,
           
          Nice report!  It cracks me up that your tent blew away.  I'd love to see the look on your face when you came back outside. :)
           
          Just one easy edit so please upload when ready and remember to delete your test file.
           
          Enjoy your fall family camping trips. 'See' you in a few months.
           
          Nancy
           
           >>Off in the distance I could see the Trail Tent 6, on its side and wedged against the trunk of a large Walnut tree. 
          EDIT: walnut (no capital)
           
            .
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