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FR: La Sportiva Hyper Mid GTX boots- Nancy Griffith

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  • Nancy Griffith
    Hi Christopher,   I ve posted my FR for the Hyper boots.  Thanks in advance for providing the edits.   Nancy   http://tinyurl.com/kk3tqk2   FIELD
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 13, 2013
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      Hi Christopher,
       
      I've posted my FR for the Hyper boots.  Thanks in advance for providing the edits.
       
      Nancy
       
       

      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
       
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Mount Ralston"  IMAGE CAPTION = "Desolation Wilderness">>I wore the boots for three multi-day backpacking trips and nine day hikes for a total of 20 days and approximately 130 miles (209 km).
      Backpacking:
      Hetch Hetchy, Yosemite National Park, California: 4 days; 32 miles (52 km); 3,900 to 7,400 ft (1,189 to 2,256 m); 35 to 70 F (2 to 21 C); varied trail conditions from exposed dry granite to marshy bogs with multiple creek crossings and muddy sections.
      Emigrant Wilderness, Sierra Nevada, California: 4 days; 24 miles (39 km); 7,160 to 8,930 ft (2,182 to 2,722 m); 55 to 85 F (13 to 29 C); mostly dry trail of dirt and rocks.
      John Muir Trail, Sierra Nevada, California: 3 days; 24 miles (39 km); 4,035 ft to 9,940 ft (1,230 to 3,030 m); 45 to 80 F (7 to 27 C); trail varied from loose sand to talus.

      Hiking:
      Forni Lake, Desolation Wilderness, California: 10 miles (16 km); 6,600 to 7,100 ft (2,012 to 2,164 m) elevation; 50 to 60 F (10 to 16 C); early season hike with lots of water run-off and snow fields.
      Mount Ralston, Sierra Nevada, California: 7 miles (11 km); 6,400 to 9,235 ft (1,950 to 2,815 m) elevation; 65 to 80 F (18 to 27 C); steep trail with packed dirt, loose sand and talus conditions
      Mount Rose, Carson Wilderness, Nevada: 10 miles (16 km); 8,900 to 10,776 ft (2,713 to 3,285 m) elevation; 60 to 80 F (15 to 27 C); trail varied from dirt to talus.

       
      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
       
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Forni Lake"  IMAGE CAPTION = "Marshy conditions">>The first hike I did in these boots was to Forni Lake.  Since it was early season the trail passed through some marshy areas, had lots of stream crossings and crossed many snow fields.  The boots were fabulous and kept my feet warm and dry.  Things were similar on our first half of the Hetch Hetchy trip but by the end of a warm 11 mile (18 km) third day my feet were hot and tired.  I stopped and removed my boots and soaked my feet in the river and changed into camp shoes before even making camp.  This feeling continued on the rest of my summer hikes with the warmer temperatures.  My feet were uncomfortably hot and sweaty most of the time.  I started leaving running shoes in the car so that I could change shoes immediately at the end of a long hike or trip.  Shorter day hikes of just a few miles weren't an issue.
      Despite my desire to wear these boots on our three-week 225 mile (362 km) hike of the John Muir Trail, my feet were much too hot on the starting 6,000 ft (1,829 m) climb out of Yosemite Valley.  So, I swapped these boots out for light hikers after the first few days.  I didn't have the same support or any waterproofness as I would have with the Hyper but overall my feet were happier.  On the last two backpacking trips I also got some sort of itchy rash between my little toes.  This is a first for me so I'm not familiar with what it was but I have to think that the hot moist conditions that these boots create contributed to it.
      I usually wore the boots with light gaiters to keep the rocks and debris out.  On the Mount Ralston hike I decided not to wear my gaiters and was sorry.  The trail is steep and has a lot of loose scree and dirt on several sections which ended up in my boots.
      So it sounds like I don't like the boots but I actually love them.  They are comfortable (other than being hot), flexible, completely waterproof and are showing great durability other than the shoelaces.  The shoelace at the toe is wearing quite a bit and starting to fray due to the gaiter hook.
      I'm looking forward to some cooler fall weather in the next test period to give these boots some different test conditions.
       

       
      SUMMARY
       
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Mount Rose"  IMAGE CAPTION = "Lake Tahoe view">>The La Sportiva Hyper Mid GTX boots are a nice combination of flexibility and support and are completely waterproof.  However, they don't breathe well at all and are too hot for summer hiking.
      Likes:
      Waterproof!
      Comfortable fit
      Good traction
      Dislikes:
      Not breathable enough for warm days
      This concludes my Field Test Report.  Check back in two months for my Long-Term Report.
      Thanks to La Sportiva and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to test these great boots.
       
       
       
      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2013.  All rights reserved.
    • thebootfitters
      Nancy, Just one suggested edit that I saw. Feel free to upload after you have addressed this item to your satisfaction. Kind regards, Christopher Comment ...
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 23, 2013
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        Nancy,

        Just one suggested edit that I saw. Feel free to upload after you have addressed this item to your satisfaction.

        Kind regards,

        Christopher


        Comment
        > On the last two backpacking trips I also got some sort of itchy rash between my little toes.  This is a first for me so I'm not familiar with what it was but I have to think that the hot moist conditions that these boots create contributed to it.
        ---That doesn't sound like much fun. I've experienced similar symptoms a time or two in the past, but I couldn't tell you what caused it either.


        Comment
        > I usually wore the boots with light gaiters to keep the rocks and debris out. 
        ---You're probably aware of this already, but the gaiters (even light ones) can decrease the effective breathability of the boots, since a lot of the "breathing" in a boot with a wp/b membrane actually happens out of the top opening of the boots. Gaiters can also retain some amount of heat that would otherwise escape. Of course, the trade-off to not wearing gaiters may not be worth it, as you point out in the next couple sentences.


        Edit
        > However, they don't breathe well at all and are too hot for summer hiking.
        ---I encourage you to insert some language to make it clear that this is your opinion based on your experience. Everyone has different experiences with waterproof/breathable footwear. Some people don't really mind them even in warmer weather. I think it is implied that this is your opinion rather than an objective statement of fact, but it would be good to clarify that this is your opinion.
      • Nancy Griffith
        Thanks Christopher.  I made a wording change as you suggested and uploaded.   Best regards,   Nancy ________________________________ From: thebootfitters
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 24, 2013
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          Thanks Christopher.  I made a wording change as you suggested and uploaded.
           
          Best regards,
           
          Nancy
          From: thebootfitters <thebootfitters@...>
          To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, September 23, 2013 1:06 AM
          Subject: [backpackgeartesters] EDITS: FR: La Sportiva Hyper Mid GTX boots- Nancy Griffith
           
          Nancy,

          Just one suggested edit that I saw. Feel free to upload after you have addressed this item to your satisfaction.

          Kind regards,

          Christopher

          Comment
          > On the last two backpacking trips I also got some sort of itchy rash between my little toes.  This is a first for me so I'm not familiar with what it was but I have to think that the hot moist conditions that these boots create contributed to it.
          ---That doesn't sound like much fun. I've experienced similar symptoms a time or two in the past, but I couldn't tell you what caused it either.

          Comment
          > I usually wore the boots with light gaiters to keep the rocks and debris out. 
          ---You're probably aware of this already, but the gaiters (even light ones) can decrease the effective breathability of the boots, since a lot of the "breathing" in a boot with a wp/b membrane actually happens out of the top opening of the boots. Gaiters can also retain some amount of heat that would otherwise escape. Of course, the trade-off to not wearing gaiters may not be worth it, as you point out in the next couple sentences.

          Edit
          > However, they don't breathe well at all and are too hot for summer hiking.
          ---I encourage you to insert some language to make it clear that this is your opinion based on your experience. Everyone has different experiences with waterproof/breathable footwear. Some people don't really mind them even in warmer weather. I think it is implied that this is your opinion rather than an objective statement of fact, but it would be good to clarify that this is your opinion.

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