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IR: Platypus Sprinter XT 25 - Jamie DeBenedetto

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  • Jamie D.
    HTML version is here: http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/IR%20-%20Platy%20Sprinter%20Pack%20-%20Jamie%20D/ Sprinter XT 25 by Platypus (Picture)
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 21, 2013
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      HTML version is here:

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/IR%20-%20Platy%20Sprinter%20Pack%20-%20Jamie%20D/


      Sprinter XT 25
      by
      Platypus

      (Picture)
      Reviewed by Jamie DeBenedetto
      July 24th , 2013

      Report Contents

      INITIAL REPORT
      July 24th , 2013
      Reviewer's Information
      Product Information & Description
      Arrival Condition & First Impressions




      --------------------- Initial Report -----------------------
      --------------------- July 24th, 2013----------------------


      Reviewer's Information

      Jamie J. DeBenedetto
      Female, 40 years old
      Height: 5'11" (180 cm)
      Weight: 170 lb (77 kg)
      Torso Length: 18.5 in (47 cm)
      Email: jdeben(at)hotmail.com
      Personal Website: www.MyDog8AZ.com
      Location: Phoenix, Arizona - The Grand Canyon State

      Background/Experience

      I spent many hours of my youth fishing, rafting, creeking, and day-hiking in the wild places of Arizona. I caught the backpacking bug in high school. Presently I work as an exPAWdition leader so I'm in the field, usually with a pack of dogs, about sixteen times a month. Primarily I'm a day-hiker with the occasional family camping trip mixed in throughout the year.
      When backpacking I prefer hammocks over ground sleeping and I gravitate toward multifunctional gear that enhances my comfort level with minimal fuss and weight. My total pack weight is typically less than 25 lbs (11 kg).

      Product Information

      Manufacturer URL www.platy.com
      Year of Manufacture Presumed 2013
      Made in Pack: China; Reservoir: USA
      MSRP $139.95 (US dollars)
      Size and Color Options S/M or M/L; Limoges Blue or Golden Yellow (I'm testing a Yellow M/L one)
      Style Internal Frame, Hydration Compatible
      Care Instructions Hand wash only with non-detergent soap, hang dry
      (Listed Specifications - Taken from the product tag and website)
      Volume for M/L size 1340 cu in (22 L) or 1525 cu in (25 L) with included reservoir
      Weight 34 oz (965 g) or 40 oz (1134 g) with reservoir
      Load Capacity Not given
      Torso Range S/M up to 18 in (46 cm); M/L up to 20 in (51 cm)
      Pack Materials Outer shell: 210D PU-Coated Diamond Ripstop Nylon
      Inner Lining: 210D PU-Coated Oxford Nylon
      Zippers: YKK Aquaguard
      Reservoir Materials Food-grade laminate – BPA and Phthalate free
      Reservoir Capacity 100 fl oz (3 L)
      (Observations as received – Measured weights taken with a digital office scale)
      Pack Weight 33 oz (936 g)
      Reservoir Weight 5.8 oz (164 g)



      Product Description

      The Platypus Sprinter XT 25 is the second largest hydration capable daypack Platypus offers. It comes with a 3 L Platypus Big Zip hydration bladder and has several waterproof features like the coated nylon shell, taped seems and Aquaguard zippers. The Sprinter, as part of Platy's Cross Trail Series, is being marketed as "the ultimate weatherproof panel-loader" designed for "any adventures from trail to summit". Although the manufacturer uses the word, "simplicity" in their description, the bag has tons of features. Here they are from back to front as I see them:

      The back section is supported by a removable frame sheet made from a lightweight Polyethylene (LDPE to be exact). The actual part of the pack that touches the users back has a reflective logo and 3D air mesh padding along the sides and lumbar areas. There's an air channel down the middle.
      The load lifter strap, which is very slender, sits in the conventional location at the top of the pack between the shoulder straps.
      The shoulder straps are lightly padded with the same 3D air mesh. They have a slight curvature with extra padding along the neckline. The interior of the straps is pocked with 3/8 in (1 cm) diameter holes, presumably for added ventilation and weight savings. Running down the front of each shoulder strap are two (four total) guide strips for the reservoir hose and a removable clip (although I have not figured out how to remove them yet). There is also a very slim hydration port at the top of each strap. Lastly is the sternum strap which is adjustable and has a bit of stretch.
      The Sprinter has an interesting hipbelt. First off it's padded and has a zippered cargo pouch on each side. The pockets are made with a stretchy mesh material. The interesting part about the hipbelt is that it's fully or partially stashable. If the user wishes the entire belt or just the pocket portion can be pushed back into the frame sheet compartment. Playtpus uses an open buckle system to secure the webbing in place when the pocket portion is hidden. At max extension the hipbelt is 58 in (147 cm), at minimum, with pockets exposed, it is 29 in (74 cm).
      Coming around to the sides of the Sprinter there are two open top pouches both made with the same stretchy mesh as the hipbelt pockets. These are about 8 in (20 cm) deep; width is hard to measure because of the stretch. I was able, with some effort, to insert a 1 L Nalgene bottle. It's a cozy fit! This leads me to believe they may have been designed with gear storage in mind more than water bottles.
      Near the base of these pockets are additional hydration ports, one on each side, where the drink tube can be poked through and brought up the shoulder strap from below.
      Also along the sides, one slightly above and one running across the bottom of each side pouch, there are two (a total of four) adjustable compression straps. These, like the hipbelt, can be stowed in the back frame compartment via nearby slits.
      The Sprinter is a top loading pack with three larger compartments and two smaller pockets. I did not count the back panel where the frame sheet lives because it's a very tight space with little room for anything other than the sheet, although with that removed it could be used for gear. The first interior compartment is meant to house the hydration bladder. Although it's a slender space the zippered opening is easily wide enough to accommodate the filled Big Zip. At the top of the pocket are two toggles that hold the bladder in place. Based on the design I'm guessing this suspension system is specific to Platy reservoirs.
      The main cargo section is next. The opening is much wider than the hydration sleeve with zippers running down to about mid-pack. This space is simply an open area, no dividers, organizer panel, or any other clutter. One exception is a small zippered mesh pouch near the opening with a key fob inside – dimensions for this niche are 11 x 6 in (28 x 15 cm).
      At the very front of the pack are the remaining two compartments. On top is the second of the smaller zippered pockets, which measures about 9 x 5 in (23 x 13 cm). Just below that is the open top quick stash pocket. The same stretchy mesh used in the hipbelt and side pockets runs down the sides. Just inside the opening, one on each side, are two elastic cords with cordlocks. These are the trekking pole or ice axe lash points. Further down, near the bottom of this compartment are the counterparts to the cords. On one side are two semi-circles of red cordage for pole tips and the other is the axe strap, which is stashable in a little slit situated just below.
      Finally, there are 2 in (5 cm) bits of red cordage strategically placed around the front of the pack offering gear attachment options of all kinds.

      The Big Zip SL has a few features of note: Foremost is the size, Platypus included their largest reservoir - 100oz (3 L) so when they say it's hydration compatible, they didn't skimp. The bladder fills from the top where the wide-mouthed "zip" is located. The trademarked "Slidelock" runs along the opening pinching the two sides together for a secure seal. The Slidelock component also has a handle and the two holes used in conjunction with the toggles inside the Sprinter to make up the suspension system.
      The food-grade container, which is BPA and Phthalate-free, has been treated with an anti-microbial agent.
      The drink tube attaches via a "Quick-Connect" port that won't allow fluid to escape the bladder when the hose isn't connected. This allows the tube to remain joined to the daypack while the reservoir is removed.
      Lastly, the mouth piece has a high capacity bite valve affix at a 90 degree angle. A simple locking mechanism, a partial turn of the valve, is used so liquid can't accidentally run out through the line.

      Arrival Condition and Informational Material

      The Platypus Sprinter XT 25 arrived in mid-July in perfect condition. After an initial inspection I found no defects or anything odd to report. The included Big Zip hydration bladder also was in good condition with the exception of a small kink in the hose. I don't think this indentation will cause any use problems but if so I will note them in my report.

      Included with the pack were two bits of helpful material, the product hang-tag and the Owner's Manual. The hang-tag offers the reader information in both English and French. The OM was in English only. Both were easy to understand. The OM offered further explanation of the pack and the Big Zip's features. Pictures accompanied the written info and although they are black and white, they do the trick. I found the tutorial on how to stow the hipbelt very beneficial. Unlike most of the other features, this one wasn't entirely self-evident at first glance, at least not to me.

      Expectations and First Impressions

      At first glance the Sprinter looks well thought out and constructed. Because I've used Platypus hydration reservoirs for several years with positive results my expectations are high for their daypack too. I'm not overly rough on my packs but since I use my equipment four to five times a week for work in addition to play, I feel like I live in my pack. It has to be comfortable and practical. I expect whatever "bells and whistles" the manufacturer included to be well made, functional, and durable.

      While tinkering around with the pack getting things set-up and adjusted I noticed it took a bit of work to thread the drink tube through the guide strips on the shoulder straps. But the amount of patience that required was nothing compared to what it took to push the hose through the hydration ports at the top of the shoulder straps. The slit is super tight. I haven't tried the lower ports yet but they feel tight as well. I'll post an update in my Field Report when I've had a chance to try them out.

      Thanks for reading, please check back in approximately two months for my Field Report.

      - Jamie J. DeBenedetto 2013
    • Ray
      Hi Jamie, I guess I will just do this as I have not heard back. Nice job on this report. I have the 35 myself. Here are your edits. Enjoy the pack and I shall
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 9, 2013
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        Hi Jamie,

        I guess I will just do this as I have not heard back. Nice job on this report. I have the 35 myself. Here are your edits. Enjoy the pack and I shall see you in a couple months.

        Ray


        ***Manufacture URL www.platy.com

        EDIT: it is the top level URL http://www.cascadedesigns.com (Their URLS change constantly)



        ***Big Zip hydration bladder and has several waterproof features like the coated nylon shell, taped seems

        EDIT: seams



        ***The actual part of the pack that touches the users back

        EDIT" user's



        ***At the top of the pocket are twotoggles that hold the bladder in place.

        EDIT: need a space at "two toggles"


        .
      • Jamie D.
        Thanks Ray and duh!! Those were very lame mistakes. All fixed, will need a folder though before we can upload. Thank you again, Jamie D.
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 11, 2013
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          Thanks Ray and duh!! Those were very lame mistakes. All fixed, will need a folder though before we can upload.

          Thank you again,
          Jamie D.

          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Ray" <rayestrella@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jamie,
          >
          > I guess I will just do this as I have not heard back. Nice job on this report. I have the 35 myself. Here are your edits. Enjoy the pack and I shall see you in a couple months.
          >
          > Ray
          >
          >
          > ***Manufacture URL www.platy.com
          >
          > EDIT: it is the top level URL http://www.cascadedesigns.com (Their URLS change constantly)
          >
          >
          >
          > ***Big Zip hydration bladder and has several waterproof features like the coated nylon shell, taped seems
          >
          > EDIT: seams
          >
          >
          >
          > ***The actual part of the pack that touches the users back
          >
          > EDIT" user's
          >
          >
          >
          > ***At the top of the pocket are twotoggles that hold the bladder in place.
          >
          > EDIT: need a space at "two toggles"
          >
          >
          > .
          >
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