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IR - Platypus Sprinter 25 L Daypack - Alex Legg

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  • alex
    Hi, Here is my IR for the Platypus Sprinter. The text is below and the HTML is at: http://tinyurl.com/l2mjfbm Platypus Sprinter Pack Test Series by Alex Legg
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 16, 2013
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      Hi,

      Here is my IR for the Platypus Sprinter. The text is below and the HTML is at:

      http://tinyurl.com/l2mjfbm


      Platypus Sprinter Pack
      Test Series by Alex Legg
      Initial Report July 15th, 2013

      Tester Information:
      Name:  Alex Legg
      Age:  30
      Gender:  Male
      Height:  6'4" (1.9 m)
      Weight:  195 lb (88 kg)
      Email address:  alexlegg2 AT yahoo DOT comCity, State, Country:  Lyons, Colorado, USA

      I have backpacked extensively throughout the southwestern United States my entire life.  I prefer a lightweight approach using tarp tents and trail shoes so that I can save my strength for clocking miles. I hike on average 4 m (6 km) daily from my back door and also enjoy trips up to 5 days in the backcountry.  I encounter elevation from 5,000 ft to 14,000 ft (1,524 m to 4,267 m) and temperatures from below 0 F to 90 F (-18 C to 32 C).

      Product Information and Specifications:

      Manufacturer: Cascade Designs, Inc.
      Year of Manufacture: 2013
      URL: http://cascadedesigns.com
      Listed Weight: 2 lb 8 oz
      Measured Weight: 2.10 oz
      MSRP: $139.95 US

      Product Description and Initial Impressions:

      The Platypus 25L Daypack looks like a cool pack. Rummaging through the different pockets and straps really fed my gear head addiction. There are pockets protected by a DWR water repellant, and pockets lined with a breathable mesh. There are straps that clip in tightly and some that compress, many of which can be tucked into a hiding spot so that they don't flap around while I'm hiking. The hip belt can also be stuffed into a hiding spot when not in use.

      The bag I am reviewing is blue. The platypus logo is printed top and center on the pack, and the Sprinter XT 25.0 model name is printed near the bottom and centered on the large mesh pocket on the front of the pack. I like this pocket and can't wait to stuff wet clothes in while on the trail. There are two more mesh pockets on the sides that look perfect for a condensation spewing water bottle or perhaps crushed empty beer cans.

      The main compartment on the Sprinter opens to a generous 25 L space. It is accessed by two zippers that pull down far allowing optimal reach to the bottom of the pack. The zippers have attached handles made of what looks to me like a thin para cord loop reinforced by a hard rubber casing. All the zippered pockets on this pack have this type of access tool. The zippers all work well gliding back and forth. Inside the main compartment, there is a mesh pocket that spans the width of the pack. This looks to me like a useful storage spot for small items. I can already see myself storing small items like keys and my phone in this pocket.

      On the top of the pack, between the Platypus logo and the main compartment there is another weather proof pocket, this one is quite bit smaller and I can only fit one hand about half way in.

      The Hydration System:

      This is my first experience with a Platypus hydration reservoir and I have to say, I'm impressed with the many smart and user friendly aspects. First, the 3 L reservoir is in its own compartment that has ample room for me to stuff random small items like extra food into. This compartment is also protected by the weather proof finish.

      The reservoir is hanging by two nylon straps that easily pop in and out of the SideLock closure. They are mounted at the sides giving the best possibility of staying level. The closure is a strong plastic and the reservoir slides out without much effort. I love the sandwich bag style closure on the Platypus. It opens and closes without trouble and I can stick my entire hand inside to clean the food safe plastic interior. The literature that came with the hydration system tells me that the lining is a 100% taste free polyethylene with SlimeGuard anti-microbial treatment. The material is also BPA free.

      My favorite thing about the hydration system is the Quick-Connect drinking tube. A simple press of a button and the tube disconnects from the reservoir with minimal spill. This is a great feature that makes cleaning and drying the system a much easier thing than I am used with other systems.

      The mouthpiece is equipped with a 90 degree shut off valve and a large rubber bite valve. I am finding it easier so far to just grab the stem of the mouthpiece to turn the valve on rather than using the plastic lever provided. The lever seems a bit small and difficult for me to operate. The mouthpiece was initially difficult for me to get used to , but after it got broken in a bit when I tried the pack out it worked well. I am however concerned about the kink in the tube right near the port in the top of the pack. I have included a picture of this.

      Suspension System and Frame:

      The Platypus pack sports padded 3D air mesh shoulder straps. I can actually see through the circular holes that have been synched through the mesh. Small nylon straps on the shoulder straps help to guide and contain the drinking tube while a hinged plastic anchors secure the mouthpiece. The shoulder straps can be adjusted easily using the thin nylon straps as can the sternum strap.

      The waistbelt on this pack is extra cool to me. I can fold the two sides up and stuff them into the back panel if I am wearing the pack around town or not in need of the extra support. They can quickly by pulled out for my long trekking adventures giving me the support I need. Both sides of the waistbelt have zippered pockets that are mesh lined and open to the air.

      The BioCurve back panel has two pads that run down the edge of the pack. Inside the pack behind the hydration system a plastic panel is accessible and removed in a simple manner. It looks like it could be a decent sitting pad, or maybe a plate, or a fan, or a dog dish, or a cutting board, or even a frisbee. Another section of the frame is sewn in and not accessible. It feels to me like a thin plastic sheeting and it works well at keeping the packs shape while the removable sheet is out.

      Trying it Out:

      The day after receiving the Platypus pack I was so excited that I quickly planned a 12 m day hike into the Wild Basin area of Rocky Mountain National Park. I encountered a light steady rain for the majority of this trip. When the rain would temporarily stop I stuffed my rain gear in the large mesh pocket in the front of the pack. I felt secure that the wet gear would not penetrate my pack and it was nice to be able to access the stuff when the rain decided to pour down again.

      When I got back to the car I emptied the minimal contents of the pack onto my seat. Other than the rain gear I had some food, a map, and my phone charger inside. The charger just ended up in there when I left my house, it's not an essential hiking tool. I ran my hands along the inside of the main compartment as well as the small compartment on the top of the pack. I felt a small amount of condensation near the bottom of the pockets. I was a bit surprised because I didn't have any items that were moist inside. In the past I have found weather proof bags to hold moisture from food and damp gear inside just as well as they hold the outside water from getting in. I had stored my food in the large mesh pocket to avoid such issues, but I was still finding moisture inside these two pockets. I am not sure if water was slowly leaking in, or if it was some sort of a condensation issue. Either way, I don't think I would feel comfortable with electronics being stored in the pack during a heavy rain storm.

      As far as comfort and ease of use, this pack worked great. I hardly noticed it on my back and it was easy to adjust. throughout the day I switched from using the hip belt and sternum strap to not using either at all. It was nice to have the room to distribute the weight differently along the trail and to be able to air out my body a bit.

      Summary:

      The Platypus pack seems to be well constructed and comfortable. The hydration system is awesome and looks like the smartest design I have seen yet. I have some slight concerns about the dependability of the weather proof finish, but other than that I really like the pack at this point. I will be taking it with me on a lot of excursions in the months to come and I am excited to be reviewing it!

      Things I like:

      1. Great organization of weather proof and mesh pockets.
      2. Smart, well engineered hydration system.
      3. Hipbelt and straps can be stowed.

      Concerns:

      1 Dependability of weather proof finish.
      2. Drinking tube kinked but doesn't effect water flow.

      I would like to thank Cascade Designs and BackpackGearTest.org for the chance to play with and review this product!
    • alex
      Shoot it looks like my report uploaded with problems.. I am out of town the next few days and I will repost soon. Thanks!
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 17, 2013
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        Shoot it looks like my report uploaded with problems.. I am out of town the next few days and I will repost soon. Thanks!


        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "alex" <alexlegg2@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > Here is my IR for the Platypus Sprinter. The text is below and the HTML is at:
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/l2mjfbm
        >
        >
        > Platypus Sprinter Pack
        > Test Series by Alex Legg
        > Initial Report July 15th, 2013
        >
        > Tester Information:
        > Name:  Alex Legg
        > Age:  30
        > Gender:  Male
        > Height:  6'4" (1.9 m)
        > Weight:  195 lb (88 kg)
        > Email address:  alexlegg2 AT yahoo DOT comCity, State, Country:  Lyons, Colorado, USA
        >
        > I have backpacked extensively throughout the southwestern United States my entire life.  I prefer a lightweight approach using tarp tents and trail shoes so that I can save my strength for clocking miles. I hike on average 4 m (6 km) daily from my back door and also enjoy trips up to 5 days in the backcountry.  I encounter elevation from 5,000 ft to 14,000 ft (1,524 m to 4,267 m) and temperatures from below 0 F to 90 F (-18 C to 32 C).
        >
        > Product Information and Specifications:
        >
        > Manufacturer: Cascade Designs, Inc.
        > Year of Manufacture: 2013
        > URL: http://cascadedesigns.com
        > Listed Weight: 2 lb 8 oz
        > Measured Weight: 2.10 oz
        > MSRP: $139.95 US
        >
        > Product Description and Initial Impressions:
        >
        > The Platypus 25L Daypack looks like a cool pack. Rummaging through the different pockets and straps really fed my gear head addiction. There are pockets protected by a DWR water repellant, and pockets lined with a breathable mesh. There are straps that clip in tightly and some that compress, many of which can be tucked into a hiding spot so that they don't flap around while I'm hiking. The hip belt can also be stuffed into a hiding spot when not in use.
        >
        > The bag I am reviewing is blue. The platypus logo is printed top and center on the pack, and the Sprinter XT 25.0 model name is printed near the bottom and centered on the large mesh pocket on the front of the pack. I like this pocket and can't wait to stuff wet clothes in while on the trail. There are two more mesh pockets on the sides that look perfect for a condensation spewing water bottle or perhaps crushed empty beer cans.
        >
        > The main compartment on the Sprinter opens to a generous 25 L space. It is accessed by two zippers that pull down far allowing optimal reach to the bottom of the pack. The zippers have attached handles made of what looks to me like a thin para cord loop reinforced by a hard rubber casing. All the zippered pockets on this pack have this type of access tool. The zippers all work well gliding back and forth. Inside the main compartment, there is a mesh pocket that spans the width of the pack. This looks to me like a useful storage spot for small items. I can already see myself storing small items like keys and my phone in this pocket.
        >
        > On the top of the pack, between the Platypus logo and the main compartment there is another weather proof pocket, this one is quite bit smaller and I can only fit one hand about half way in.
        >
        > The Hydration System:
        >
        > This is my first experience with a Platypus hydration reservoir and I have to say, I'm impressed with the many smart and user friendly aspects. First, the 3 L reservoir is in its own compartment that has ample room for me to stuff random small items like extra food into. This compartment is also protected by the weather proof finish.
        >
        > The reservoir is hanging by two nylon straps that easily pop in and out of the SideLock closure. They are mounted at the sides giving the best possibility of staying level. The closure is a strong plastic and the reservoir slides out without much effort. I love the sandwich bag style closure on the Platypus. It opens and closes without trouble and I can stick my entire hand inside to clean the food safe plastic interior. The literature that came with the hydration system tells me that the lining is a 100% taste free polyethylene with SlimeGuard anti-microbial treatment. The material is also BPA free.
        >
        > My favorite thing about the hydration system is the Quick-Connect drinking tube. A simple press of a button and the tube disconnects from the reservoir with minimal spill. This is a great feature that makes cleaning and drying the system a much easier thing than I am used with other systems.
        >
        > The mouthpiece is equipped with a 90 degree shut off valve and a large rubber bite valve. I am finding it easier so far to just grab the stem of the mouthpiece to turn the valve on rather than using the plastic lever provided. The lever seems a bit small and difficult for me to operate. The mouthpiece was initially difficult for me to get used to , but after it got broken in a bit when I tried the pack out it worked well. I am however concerned about the kink in the tube right near the port in the top of the pack. I have included a picture of this.
        >
        > Suspension System and Frame:
        >
        > The Platypus pack sports padded 3D air mesh shoulder straps. I can actually see through the circular holes that have been synched through the mesh. Small nylon straps on the shoulder straps help to guide and contain the drinking tube while a hinged plastic anchors secure the mouthpiece. The shoulder straps can be adjusted easily using the thin nylon straps as can the sternum strap.
        >
        > The waistbelt on this pack is extra cool to me. I can fold the two sides up and stuff them into the back panel if I am wearing the pack around town or not in need of the extra support. They can quickly by pulled out for my long trekking adventures giving me the support I need. Both sides of the waistbelt have zippered pockets that are mesh lined and open to the air.
        >
        > The BioCurve back panel has two pads that run down the edge of the pack. Inside the pack behind the hydration system a plastic panel is accessible and removed in a simple manner. It looks like it could be a decent sitting pad, or maybe a plate, or a fan, or a dog dish, or a cutting board, or even a frisbee. Another section of the frame is sewn in and not accessible. It feels to me like a thin plastic sheeting and it works well at keeping the packs shape while the removable sheet is out.
        >
        > Trying it Out:
        >
        > The day after receiving the Platypus pack I was so excited that I quickly planned a 12 m day hike into the Wild Basin area of Rocky Mountain National Park. I encountered a light steady rain for the majority of this trip. When the rain would temporarily stop I stuffed my rain gear in the large mesh pocket in the front of the pack. I felt secure that the wet gear would not penetrate my pack and it was nice to be able to access the stuff when the rain decided to pour down again.
        >
        > When I got back to the car I emptied the minimal contents of the pack onto my seat. Other than the rain gear I had some food, a map, and my phone charger inside. The charger just ended up in there when I left my house, it's not an essential hiking tool. I ran my hands along the inside of the main compartment as well as the small compartment on the top of the pack. I felt a small amount of condensation near the bottom of the pockets. I was a bit surprised because I didn't have any items that were moist inside. In the past I have found weather proof bags to hold moisture from food and damp gear inside just as well as they hold the outside water from getting in. I had stored my food in the large mesh pocket to avoid such issues, but I was still finding moisture inside these two pockets. I am not sure if water was slowly leaking in, or if it was some sort of a condensation issue. Either way, I don't think I would feel comfortable with electronics being stored in the pack during a heavy rain storm.
        >
        > As far as comfort and ease of use, this pack worked great. I hardly noticed it on my back and it was easy to adjust. throughout the day I switched from using the hip belt and sternum strap to not using either at all. It was nice to have the room to distribute the weight differently along the trail and to be able to air out my body a bit.
        >
        > Summary:
        >
        > The Platypus pack seems to be well constructed and comfortable. The hydration system is awesome and looks like the smartest design I have seen yet. I have some slight concerns about the dependability of the weather proof finish, but other than that I really like the pack at this point. I will be taking it with me on a lot of excursions in the months to come and I am excited to be reviewing it!
        >
        > Things I like:
        >
        > 1. Great organization of weather proof and mesh pockets.
        > 2. Smart, well engineered hydration system.
        > 3. Hipbelt and straps can be stowed.
        >
        > Concerns:
        >
        > 1 Dependability of weather proof finish.
        > 2. Drinking tube kinked but doesn't effect water flow.
        >
        > I would like to thank Cascade Designs and BackpackGearTest.org for the chance to play with and review this product!
        >
      • Ray
        Hi Alex, Thanks for the report, I will do the edits for it until they find the monitor. ;-) Ray ***Manufacturer: Cascade Designs, Inc. EDIT: they ask us to
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 9, 2013
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          Hi Alex,

          Thanks for the report, I will do the edits for it until they find the monitor. ;-)

          Ray



          ***Manufacturer: Cascade Designs, Inc.

          EDIT: they ask us to list the separate brand which in this case is Platypus



          ***Listed Weight: 2 lb 8 oz

          EDIT: need the Metric conversion



          ***Measured Weight: 2.10 o

          EDIT: need to finish this



          ***The main compartment on the Sprinter opens to a generous 25 L space.

          EDIT: need the conversion (cubic inches)



          ***The zippers have attached handles made of what looks to me like a thin para cord

          EDIT: paracord (one word)



          On the top of the pack, between the Platypus logo and the main compartment there is another weather proof pocket,

          EDIT: weatherproof



          ***This compartment is also protected by the weather proof finish.

          EDIT: see above (please change all instances of this as there are a lot)



          This is a great feature that makes cleaning and drying the system a much easier thing than I am used with other systems.

          EDIT: than I am used "to" with other systems



          ***The mouthpiece was initially difficult for me to get used to , but after it got broken

          EDIT: delete extra space before the comma



          in a bit when I tried the pack out it worked well. I am however concerned about the kink in the tube right near the port in the top of the pack. I have included a picture of this.



          ***I can actually see through the circular holes that have been synched through the mesh.

          Edit: I don't understand the use of the word "synched". Did you mean "cinched"? Even that does not make sense to me. How are holes cinched?



          ***Small nylon straps on the shoulder straps help to guide and contain the drinking tube while a hinged plastic anchors secure the mouthpiece.

          EDIT: no "s" on anchor (or delete "a" to make it plural)



          ***It feels to me like a thin plastic sheeting and it works well at keeping the packs shape while the removable sheet is out.

          EDIT: the pack's shape



          ***The day after receiving the Platypus pack I was so excited that I quickly planned a 12 m day hike

          EDIT: 12 mi or 12 mile, plus need Metric conversion (Or were you only going 12 meters? ;-)


          *** throughout the day I switched from using the hip belt and sternum strap to not using either at all.

          EDIT: Throughout (needs a cap)




          ***2. Drinking tube kinked but doesn't effect water flow.

          EDIT: doesn't "affect" water flow



          EDIT: you need to say something about this concluding your Initial Report and to check back in two months for the Field Report.
        • alex
          Hi Ray, Thanks for your edits! It s nice to get the chance to work with you again. As soon as I see a folder created for this pack, I will get the edited
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 15, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Ray,

            Thanks for your edits! It's nice to get the chance to work with you again. As soon as I see a folder created for this pack, I will get the edited version posted to the BGT site. Talk to you later,

            Alex Legg

            --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Ray" <rayestrella@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Alex,
            >
            > Thanks for the report, I will do the edits for it until they find the monitor. ;-)
            >
            > Ray
            >
            >
            >
            > ***Manufacturer: Cascade Designs, Inc.
            >
            > EDIT: they ask us to list the separate brand which in this case is Platypus
            >
            >
            >
            > ***Listed Weight: 2 lb 8 oz
            >
            > EDIT: need the Metric conversion
            >
            >
            >
            > ***Measured Weight: 2.10 o
            >
            > EDIT: need to finish this
            >
            >
            >
            > ***The main compartment on the Sprinter opens to a generous 25 L space.
            >
            > EDIT: need the conversion (cubic inches)
            >
            >
            >
            > ***The zippers have attached handles made of what looks to me like a thin para cord
            >
            > EDIT: paracord (one word)
            >
            >
            >
            > On the top of the pack, between the Platypus logo and the main compartment there is another weather proof pocket,
            >
            > EDIT: weatherproof
            >
            >
            >
            > ***This compartment is also protected by the weather proof finish.
            >
            > EDIT: see above (please change all instances of this as there are a lot)
            >
            >
            >
            > This is a great feature that makes cleaning and drying the system a much easier thing than I am used with other systems.
            >
            > EDIT: than I am used "to" with other systems
            >
            >
            >
            > ***The mouthpiece was initially difficult for me to get used to , but after it got broken
            >
            > EDIT: delete extra space before the comma
            >
            >
            >
            > in a bit when I tried the pack out it worked well. I am however concerned about the kink in the tube right near the port in the top of the pack. I have included a picture of this.
            >
            >
            >
            > ***I can actually see through the circular holes that have been synched through the mesh.
            >
            > Edit: I don't understand the use of the word "synched". Did you mean "cinched"? Even that does not make sense to me. How are holes cinched?
            >
            >
            >
            > ***Small nylon straps on the shoulder straps help to guide and contain the drinking tube while a hinged plastic anchors secure the mouthpiece.
            >
            > EDIT: no "s" on anchor (or delete "a" to make it plural)
            >
            >
            >
            > ***It feels to me like a thin plastic sheeting and it works well at keeping the packs shape while the removable sheet is out.
            >
            > EDIT: the pack's shape
            >
            >
            >
            > ***The day after receiving the Platypus pack I was so excited that I quickly planned a 12 m day hike
            >
            > EDIT: 12 mi or 12 mile, plus need Metric conversion (Or were you only going 12 meters? ;-)
            >
            >
            > *** throughout the day I switched from using the hip belt and sternum strap to not using either at all.
            >
            > EDIT: Throughout (needs a cap)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ***2. Drinking tube kinked but doesn't effect water flow.
            >
            > EDIT: doesn't "affect" water flow
            >
            >
            >
            > EDIT: you need to say something about this concluding your Initial Report and to check back in two months for the Field Report.
            >
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