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LTR - HEAT HOLDER ORIGINAL THERMAL SOCKS-Frances Penn

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  • fpenn@sbcglobal.net
    http://tinyurl.com/dymugja HEAT HOLDER ORIGINAL THERMAL SOCKS TEST SERIES BY FRANCES PENN LTR May 07, 2013 TESTER INFORMATION NAME: Frances Penn EMAIL: fpenn
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 26, 2013
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      http://tinyurl.com/dymugja

      HEAT HOLDER ORIGINAL THERMAL SOCKS
      TEST SERIES BY FRANCES PENN
      LTR
      May 07, 2013

      TESTER INFORMATION

      NAME: Frances Penn
      EMAIL: fpenn AT sbcglobal DOT net
      AGE: 56
      LOCATION: Santa Ana, California
      GENDER: F
      HEIGHT: 5' 9" (1.75 m)
      WEIGHT: 130 lb (59.00 kg)

      I have been backpacking for six years mostly on long weekends in Southern California with two or more 5-day trips per year in the Sierras. My total daypack weight is usually 15 lb (7 kg) and my total backpack weight is usually 28-30 lb (13-14 kg) depending on the need for a bear canister. I am a tent camper and have experienced all night rain, heavy winds, camping in snow once, but mostly fair weather.

      LONG-TERM REPORT

      LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      Trip #1:
      Location: San Jacinto Wilderness, California USA
      Elevation: 8,000 ft (2438 M)
      Trip duration: 2 days, 1 night
      Conditions: dirt trail with some steep rocky portions
      Temperatures: 30-50 F (-1-10 C)
      Weather: cold and windy during the day and 10 F (5 C) at night with light snow flurries during dinner

      I wore the socks during the day with my waterproof boots just in case it snowed. The socks kept my feet warm although my boots felt a little tighter than with my regular hiking socks. A little snow fell at night in camp during dinner. I was really glad I wore the socks at night in my sleeping bag because there was a little bit of snow on the ground by the time we went to bed. Since it was still really cold and windy the next day, I wore them to hike back to the trailhead.

      Trip #2:
      Location: Sturtevant Camp near Mt. Wilson, California USA
      Elevation: 3,000 ft (914 M)
      Trip duration: 3 days, 2 nights
      Conditions: dirt trail with some steep rocky portions
      Temperatures: 30-60 (-1-15 C)
      Weather: sunny days and cool nights

      I wore the socks at night because we had to walk from our little cabins to the group dining hall and to the bathroom building. We stayed in small group cabins that didn't have much heat so the socks kept my feet warm at night in my sleeping bag.

      Trip #3:
      Location: Big Bear area, California USA
      Elevation: 7,000 ft (2134 m)
      Trip duration: 2 days, 1 night
      Conditions: off trail forest
      Temperature: 30-50 F (-1-10 C)
      Weather: cold days hiking in the forest on about 6 inches of snow pack

      I wore the socks all day hiking in the snow. We used our snowshoes when the snow was deep enough. I also wore the socks at night to keep my feet warm.

      Trip #4:
      Location: Joshua Tree National Park, California USA
      Elevation: 3,000 ft (914 m)
      Trip duration: 5 days, 4 nights
      Conditions: sandy desert terrain
      Temperature: 30-50 F (-1-10 C)
      Weather: cool and slightly breezy days

      I wore the socks at night in camp during dinner, all night in my sleeping bag and in the morning to make breakfast. I didn't wear them during the day because it wasn't cold enough to need them.

      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1" IMAGE CAPTION = "stormy day in Big Bear">>
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2" IMAGE CAPTION = "close-up">>

      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      The socks kept my feet warm during the days hiking in the cold and wind, hiking in snow and snowshoeing, and all night on some very cold nights. I wore them to go snowboarding in the Big Bear area on a cold and stormy day. I also wore them for snowshoe day hikes in the Big Bear area. When the weather was cold, I didn't notice my boots feeling tighter than usual due to the thickness of the socks. The socks wicked away any moisture that may have occurred. I didn't notice any dampness from pespiration.

      I washed the socks after every trip. When I had time, I hung them to dry. When I didn't have time, I dried them in the dryer. The socks took two days to dry by hanging, being turned inside out after the first day. I would not wash them on a backpacking trip because of the drying time, but I would carry an extra pair on an extended trip.

      By the end of the testing period, I noticed the socks would slide halfway down my leg by the end of the day. The socks didn't bunch or slide inside my boots. The socks did not create pilling on the outside. The fleece on the inside looks the same as when the socks were new.

      SUMMARY

      I was happy to have these socks for my trips this past winter. In the past, I wore fleece socks at night and my feet were cold on the coldest nights. Wearing these socks, my feet were warm both during the cold days and the even colder nights. Now that it is getting closer to summer here in California, I will be putting these socks away with my winter gear. I will definitely wear them when the weather turns cold again next Fall. I feel lucky to have been chosen for this test. Otherwise I would not have known about these awesomely warm fleece socks.

      This test series is now concluded. Thank you to Heat Holders and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to test these wonderful socks.



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