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FR- ISIS Slipstream Jacket - Montovan

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  • sull0294
    Hi Derek, I just finished my field report for the ISIS Slipstream jacket, but both the backpackgeartest website and the teststatus websites are not working for
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 26, 2013
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      Hi Derek,

      I just finished my field report for the ISIS Slipstream jacket, but both the backpackgeartest website and the teststatus websites are not working for me. They seem to be down but it could also be something funny going on with my computer. As such, I can't access your email address to send this to you directly (there is probably another way to do it, but having both sites down has eliminated my first three approaches. I have included the test file here and will upload the html to the test folder and post a revised note with the link as soon as I can access the website.

      Thanks,
      Katie

      ISIS Slipstream Jacket

      Test Series by Kathryn Montovan
      INITIAL REPORT: December 29, 2012/ <#IR>
      FIELD REPORT: March 26, 2012/ <#FR>

      Field Report

      Field Conditions

      Field Conditions: 5, day-long hikes and snow-shoeing trips near Ithaca,
      New York. Conditions included rain, snow, sun, wind, with temperatures
      between 10 F and 40 F (-12 to 4 C).

      I have also found reasons to wear this jacket nearly nearly every day
      between when it arrived at my house, and the arrival of warm spring
      weather to my region.


      Field Report

      Active use in temperatures between 10 and 20 F (-12 C and 7 C): This
      jacket is too warm for me to use it during heavy activity even when it
      is cold. Initially I experimented with it to figure out what
      temperatures made it an appropriate layer for active use. I found that I
      generated too much heat while snowshoeing or vigorous hiking in
      temperatures down to 10 F (-12 C) (which were the coldest conditions I
      was highly active in this year). I found that the jacket was
      appropriately warm for less rigorous hikes in temperatures between 10 F
      and 20 F (-12 to -7 C). When shoveling, I usually grabbed this jacket
      and by the end of my shoveling would have it at least partially unzipped
      to help regulate my temperature.

      Resting use in temperatures between 10 F and 40 F: I found this jacket
      was a really excellent way to keep warm when I am inactive outdoors in
      the cold. This included breaks (making hot drinks) on snow-shoe or
      rigorous hiking adventures, waiting at bus-stops, meandering around
      town, or watching the stars on a cool spring evening. It is small enough
      to fit easily into my day pack, and keeps me very warm in all of the
      conditions I have encountered.

      Snow: This jacket did well in the snow. One time when I was shoveling I
      noticed that snowflakes that rested on the jacket melted fairly quickly,
      demonstrating that a significant amount of heat was making it through
      the insulation, but this moisture did not make it through the durable
      water repellent fabric to the down insulation.

      Rain: One day I got caught for a 10 minute walk in an unexpected just
      above freezing rain shower (37 F/3 C), and put the water repellency to
      more of a test than I had intended. I remained dry and the down remained
      lofty, and the jacket shell dried fairly quickly after going inside.
      Overall, it was a successful test, but it was nerve racking and, in the
      future, I will try to avoid getting caught without a rain jacket to
      throw over this jacket when rain is expected.

      Hoodlessness: My only wish is that this jacket had a hood. I love down
      hoods because they are so wonderfully warm, and hoods in general help
      keep drafts off my neck and rain and snow from ending up down my back.
      That being said, this it one of the only jackets that I love that does
      not have a hood. The soft collar and the warmth of the jacket more than
      make up for the inconvenience of needing to wear a neck gator, scarf,
      and hat to keep my neck, face and head warm.

      Durability/Wear: This jacket shows very few signs of wear even with the
      hard, daily use I have put it through. There were multiple times where I
      caught the fabric on a thorn, stick, or something and worried that the
      fabric would be damaged and found that it was surprisingly resilient. I
      have regularly found a feather or two sneaking through a seam, but the
      problem has not worsened with use and is not happening too often. There
      is one thread on one of the baffles on the back of the coat (where it
      looks like the thread was changed) that is starting to pull out and when
      I gently pulled on it to see it it was stable, the baffle stitching
      started to pull out. I will do what I can to tie this thread off and
      limit the damage this thread can do.

      Loose thread from a baffle
      on the back of the jacket


      Summary

      I love the ISIS Slipstream jacket. It looks like it is about time to
      wash my Slipstream Jacket, so I will soon wash it according to the
      manufacturers directions and report on how it fairs in the wash in my
      long term report


      Likes

      * Warmth
      * Comfort
      * Water repellency
      * Length, style, and fashionable details
      * Trim design


      Dislikes

      * Occasional loose feathers come through seems
      * With use the zipper protector (the ribbon reinforcement to keep
      the zipper from catching) has started to softer and occasionally
      will get stuck in the zipper.
      * Would love to have a hood.

      Thank you to ISIS and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to test
      the Slipstream Jacket. Check back in May to find out more about how the
      this jacket has performed on my upcoming spring backcountry adventures.
    • Derek Hansen
      Katie, Thank you for posting your report. Here are your edits in typical fashion. Please remove your test report and upload your final once the edits are done.
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 27, 2013
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        Katie,

        Thank you for posting your report. Here are your edits in typical fashion. Please remove your test report and upload your final once the edits are done.

        Best,

        ~derek

        # # #


        On Mar 26, 2013, at 5:39 PM, sull0294 <sull0294@...> wrote:

        > temperatures between 10 F and 40 F (-12 to 4 C).

        > Active use in temperatures between 10 and 20 F (-12 C and 7 C): This

        > 10 F and 20 F (-12 to -7 C).

        EDIT: Convention. Either drop the first "F" or add a "C" or vice versa.



        > Resting use in temperatures between 10 F and 40 F:
        EDIT: Missing conversion.


        > on snow-shoe or rigorous hiking adventures, waiting at bus-stops,
        EDIT: snowshoe (one word, not hyphenated)
        EDIT: bus stops (no hyphen needed)



        > That being said, this it one of the only jackets
        EDIT: ...this _is_ one of...



        > * Would love to have a hood.

        Edit/Comment: I'm getting mixed signals from your report. You say how much you love this jacket, and that "the soft collar and the warmth of the jacket more than make up for the inconvenience of needing [a hood]".

        It reads like the jacket is fine without the hood, but yet it is one of your dislikes. I would suggest you clarify your statement to indicate despite its warmth and the nice soft collar, it would be nice to have an attached hood?
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