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LTR - 180 Tack Stove - Alex Legg

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  • alex
    Hi, Here is my very late LTR for the 180 Tack Stove. Our computer is still broken but I have been able to painstakingly battle with the stuck internal mouse
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 14, 2013
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      Hi,

      Here is my very late LTR for the 180 Tack Stove. Our computer is still broken but I have been able to painstakingly battle with the stuck internal mouse and my USB external mouse enough to produce a report.. I'm sorry for the delay and for the lack of pictures, but I just really wanted to get the report in so that I didn't get in trouble. Thank you!

      The HTML is at http://tinyurl.com/by8g88j and the text is below.


      Long Term Report


      Field Conditions:

      I have continued to use the 180 Stove on all my backpacking and car camping trips throughout the last part of the testing period.

      I took the stove on a 2-day 1-night trip to the Catilina mountains north of Tucson. The elevation was around 7,500 ft (2,286 m) and the temperature ranged from 25 F to 55 F (-4 C to 13 C).

      I also used the stove on an overnight trip to the Santa Rita Mountains south of Tucson. The elevation ranged from around 5,000 ft to around 8,000 ft (1,524 ft to around 2,438 ft) and the temperature ranged from 30 F to 45 F (-1 C to 7 C).

      The stove also was used on an overnight car camping trip to the Rincon mountains east of Tucson. The elevation was around 6,500 ft (1,981 ft) and the temperature ranged from 35 F to 50 F (2 C to 10 C).


      Performance in the Field:

      I hope I have this stove for a long time and I think I have a good chance. The sturdy metal construction and lack of mechanical parts make it pretty hard to break. If anything gets bent then I bend it back. If it gets wet then I wipe it off. I haven't had any rust issues even after leaving it out in the rain overnight.

      I have again found in difficult to find dry tinder in the high country I have been exploring, but I have had great luck with pulling coals from a raging fire and tossing them into the stove. A good coal of about 2 in by 2 in (5 cm by 5 cm) is enough to easily cook some hot dogs or water for coffee. I like to get some flames burning on the coals when I boil water so I try and throw some dry sticks on.

      This stove has been a big hit among my backpacking friends as well as with people I have met along the trail. Everyone I have talked to loves the idea of a natural fuel burning stove when weather permits for dry fuel. As I tell people, I do have to wait a bit longer for food to cook, but it is so much more fun to play with fire than to watch a blue flame burn from my fuel burning stoves.

      Summary:

      This has been a fun product to test and one that I am happy to own. I look forward to burning stuff and cooking with it in the future.

      Things I like:
      1. More fun for me than using a fuel burning stove.
      2. Strong and durable.
      3. Environmentally smart

      Things I don't like:
      1. Lots of soot
      2. Hard to use if there is no dry tinder around.

      I would like to thank 180 Tack, LLC and BackpackGearTest.org for the chance to test this cool product!
    • Mike Pearl
      Hi Alex, Sorry to hear your still suffering computer problems. I know what a what a hassle that is. Isn t it fun to stoke others on new/different gear! It s
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 15, 2013
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        Hi Alex,

        Sorry to hear your still suffering computer problems. I know what a what a hassle that is.
        Isn't it fun to stoke others on new/different gear! It's been nice working with you on this series. A few edits and you're good to go.

        Best,
        Mike

        EDIT: Clickable link to LTR at the top of the page is missing.

        ***The elevation ranged from around 5,000 ft to around 8,000 ft (1,524 ft to around 2,438 ft)***

        EDIT: (1,524 m to around 2,438 m)

        ***The elevation was around 6,500 ft (1,981 ft)***

        EDIT: (1,981 m)


        --- On Fri, 3/15/13, alexander legg <alexlegg2@...> wrote:

        > From: alexander legg <alexlegg2@...>
        > Subject: LTR - 180 Tack Stove - Alex Legg
        > To: mikepearl36@...
        > Date: Friday, March 15, 2013, 1:50 AM
        > Hi,
        >
        > Here is my very late LTR for the 180 Tack Stove.  Our
        > computer is still broken but I have been able to
        > painstakingly battle with the stuck internal mouse and my
        > USB external mouse enough to produce a report..  I'm
        > sorry for the delay and for the lack of pictures, but I just
        > really wanted to get the report in so that I didn't get in
        > trouble.  Thank you!
        >
        > The HTML is at http://tinyurl.com/by8g88j and the text
        > is below.
        >
        >
        > Long Term Report
        >
        >
        > Field Conditions:
        >
        > I have continued to use the 180 Stove on all my backpacking
        > and car camping trips throughout the last part of the
        > testing period.
        >
        > I took the stove on a 2-day 1-night trip to the Catilina
        > mountains north of Tucson.  The elevation was around
        > 7,500 ft (2,286 m) and the temperature ranged from 25 F to
        > 55 F (-4 C to 13 C).
        >
        > I also used the stove on an overnight trip to the Santa Rita
        > Mountains south of Tucson. The elevation ranged from around
        > 5,000 ft to around 8,000 ft (1,524 ft to around 2,438 ft)
        > and the temperature ranged from 30 F to 45 F (-1 C to 7 C).
        >
        > The stove also was used on an overnight car camping trip to
        > the Rincon mountains east of Tucson.  The elevation was
        > around 6,500 ft (1,981 ft) and the temperature ranged from
        > 35 F to 50 F (2 C to 10 C).
        >
        >
        > Performance in the Field:
        >
        > I hope I have this stove for a long time and I think I have
        > a good chance.  The sturdy metal construction and lack
        > of mechanical parts make it pretty hard to break.  If
        > anything gets bent then I bend it back.  If it gets wet
        > then I wipe it off.  I haven't had any rust 
        > issues even after leaving it out in the rain
        > overnight. 
        >
        > I have again found in difficult to find dry tinder in the
        > high country I have been exploring, but I have had great
        > luck with pulling coals from a raging fire and tossing them
        > into the stove.  A good coal of about 2 in by 2 in (5
        > cm by 5 cm) is enough to easily cook some hot dogs or water
        > for coffee.  I like to get some flames burning on the
        > coals when I boil water so I try and throw some dry sticks
        > on. 
        >
        > This stove has been a big hit among my backpacking friends
        > as well as with people I have met along the trail. 
        > Everyone I have talked to loves the idea of a natural fuel
        > burning stove when weather permits for dry fuel.  As I
        > tell people, I do have to wait a bit longer for food to
        > cook, but it is so much more fun to play with fire than to
        > watch a blue flame burn from my fuel burning stoves. 
        >  
        >
        > Summary:
        >
        > This has been a fun product to test and one that I am happy
        > to own.  I look forward to burning stuff and cooking
        > with it in the future. 
        >
        > Things I like:
        > 1.  More fun for me than using a fuel burning stove.
        > 2.  Strong and durable.
        > 3.  Environmentally smart
        >
        > Things I don't like:
        > 1.  Lots of soot
        > 2.  Hard to use if there is no dry tinder around.
        >
        > I would like to thank 180 Tack, LLC and BackpackGearTest.org
        > for the chance to test this cool product!
        >
        >
      • alex
        Mike, Thanks for your edits. I have made the corrections and uploaded to the BGT site. I ve had a good time with this stove! Thanks again, Alex Legg
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 15, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Mike,
          Thanks for your edits. I have made the corrections and uploaded to the BGT site. I've had a good time with this stove! Thanks again,

          Alex Legg

          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Mike Pearl <mikepearl36@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Alex,
          >
          > Sorry to hear your still suffering computer problems. I know what a what a hassle that is.
          > Isn't it fun to stoke others on new/different gear! It's been nice working with you on this series. A few edits and you're good to go.
          >
          > Best,
          > Mike
          >
          > EDIT: Clickable link to LTR at the top of the page is missing.
          >
          > ***The elevation ranged from around 5,000 ft to around 8,000 ft (1,524 ft to around 2,438 ft)***
          >
          > EDIT: (1,524 m to around 2,438 m)
          >
          > ***The elevation was around 6,500 ft (1,981 ft)***
          >
          > EDIT: (1,981 m)
          >
          >
          > --- On Fri, 3/15/13, alexander legg <alexlegg2@...> wrote:
          >
          > > From: alexander legg <alexlegg2@...>
          > > Subject: LTR - 180 Tack Stove - Alex Legg
          > > To: mikepearl36@...
          > > Date: Friday, March 15, 2013, 1:50 AM
          > > Hi,
          > >
          > > Here is my very late LTR for the 180 Tack Stove.  Our
          > > computer is still broken but I have been able to
          > > painstakingly battle with the stuck internal mouse and my
          > > USB external mouse enough to produce a report..  I'm
          > > sorry for the delay and for the lack of pictures, but I just
          > > really wanted to get the report in so that I didn't get in
          > > trouble.  Thank you!
          > >
          > > The HTML is at http://tinyurl.com/by8g88j and the text
          > > is below.
          > >
          > >
          > > Long Term Report
          > >
          > >
          > > Field Conditions:
          > >
          > > I have continued to use the 180 Stove on all my backpacking
          > > and car camping trips throughout the last part of the
          > > testing period.
          > >
          > > I took the stove on a 2-day 1-night trip to the Catilina
          > > mountains north of Tucson.  The elevation was around
          > > 7,500 ft (2,286 m) and the temperature ranged from 25 F to
          > > 55 F (-4 C to 13 C).
          > >
          > > I also used the stove on an overnight trip to the Santa Rita
          > > Mountains south of Tucson. The elevation ranged from around
          > > 5,000 ft to around 8,000 ft (1,524 ft to around 2,438 ft)
          > > and the temperature ranged from 30 F to 45 F (-1 C to 7 C).
          > >
          > > The stove also was used on an overnight car camping trip to
          > > the Rincon mountains east of Tucson.  The elevation was
          > > around 6,500 ft (1,981 ft) and the temperature ranged from
          > > 35 F to 50 F (2 C to 10 C).
          > >
          > >
          > > Performance in the Field:
          > >
          > > I hope I have this stove for a long time and I think I have
          > > a good chance.  The sturdy metal construction and lack
          > > of mechanical parts make it pretty hard to break.  If
          > > anything gets bent then I bend it back.  If it gets wet
          > > then I wipe it off.  I haven't had any rust 
          > > issues even after leaving it out in the rain
          > > overnight. 
          > >
          > > I have again found in difficult to find dry tinder in the
          > > high country I have been exploring, but I have had great
          > > luck with pulling coals from a raging fire and tossing them
          > > into the stove.  A good coal of about 2 in by 2 in (5
          > > cm by 5 cm) is enough to easily cook some hot dogs or water
          > > for coffee.  I like to get some flames burning on the
          > > coals when I boil water so I try and throw some dry sticks
          > > on. 
          > >
          > > This stove has been a big hit among my backpacking friends
          > > as well as with people I have met along the trail. 
          > > Everyone I have talked to loves the idea of a natural fuel
          > > burning stove when weather permits for dry fuel.  As I
          > > tell people, I do have to wait a bit longer for food to
          > > cook, but it is so much more fun to play with fire than to
          > > watch a blue flame burn from my fuel burning stoves. 
          > >  
          > >
          > > Summary:
          > >
          > > This has been a fun product to test and one that I am happy
          > > to own.  I look forward to burning stuff and cooking
          > > with it in the future. 
          > >
          > > Things I like:
          > > 1.  More fun for me than using a fuel burning stove.
          > > 2.  Strong and durable.
          > > 3.  Environmentally smart
          > >
          > > Things I don't like:
          > > 1.  Lots of soot
          > > 2.  Hard to use if there is no dry tinder around.
          > >
          > > I would like to thank 180 Tack, LLC and BackpackGearTest.org
          > > for the chance to test this cool product!
          > >
          > >
          >
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