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EDIT/Approval - LTR: NEMO Obi 2p Tent- Nancy Griffith

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  • Mike Mosack
    Hi Nancy, Just a couple of edits and you’re good to upload. Your edits are in the usual format - EDIT – must change edit – my recommended change if you
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 10, 2013
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      Hi Nancy,
      Just a couple of edits and you’re good to upload.

      Your edits are in the usual format -
      EDIT – must change
      edit – my recommended change if you agree
      comment – just that
      So, here we go...

      “This requires removing the Jake's Feet from the tent and then the pole, footprint and fly attach to the feet.”

      EDIT – This sentence is difficult to read as “footprint and fly attach to the feet” seems to be a disjointed thought that was added. I would either rewrite this or split it into two sentences.

      “With the fly completely closed down there was adequate wind protection.”

      edit – “down” is unnecessary and repetitive. I would just write, “With the fly completely closed there was adequate wind protection.”



      That’s it! Please remember to delete your test file copy.
      It was good to be able to work with you during this test and I hope to see you again soon.
      Mike



      From: Nancy Griffith
      Sent: Monday, February 04, 2013 5:56 PM
      To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com ; Mike Mosack
      Subject: [backpackgeartesters] LTR: NEMO Obi 2p Tent- Nancy Griffith


      Hi Mike,

      I've posted my LTR to the test folder. Thanks in advance for providing the edits.

      My camera died during the test period but my phone managed to bail me out.

      Nancy

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/LTR-%20NEMO%20Obi%20Tent-%20Nancy%20Griffith/

      http://tinyurl.com/bjabu4m


      LONG-TERM REPORT

      LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      < >Over the Long-Term test period I used the tent for an additional two backpacking trips of three days each for four additional nights for a total of twelve nights. All uses were two-person with my husband sharing the tent with me. He is 5' 10 " (1.8 m) tall and weighs 165 lb (75 kg).
      Backpacking:
      Point Reyes National Seashore, California: 2 nights; 9.3 mi (15 km); 0 to 1,407 ft (429 m) elevation; overnight lows of 40 and 42 F (4 to 5 C); sunny to partly cloudy conditions.
      Snowshoe Backpacking:
      Loon Lake Trail, Sierra Nevada, California: 2 nights; 16.2 mi (26 km); elevation 6,327 to 7,030 ft (1,928 to 2,143 m); 22 to 50 F (-5 to 10 C); clear to cloudy conditions with light wind. Camping was on 4 ft (1.2 m) of packed snow.

      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      The tent continued to perform similarly to the Field Test period but I was able to snow camp and use the footprint/fly combination in sand during this test period.
      < >On the Point Reyes coastal trip I had the opportunity to use the footprint and fly configuration. This requires removing the Jake's Feet from the tent and then the pole, footprint and fly attach to the feet. We had hiked to our campsite near the coast and decided to take it down to the beach for a peaceful afternoon since I wasn't feeling very well. The sun was shining and it was nice to have the fly as a shade. As I took a nap the wind kicked up significantly and the fly then provided some needed wind block. Eventually too much sand was blowing under as the wind increased and we decided to head back to camp.
      I really like the option of setting up this way although it is a bit of a luxury. On most of my future trips, I probably won't choose to carry the footprint in order to keep my pack weight down and since I usually don't have time during the day for lounging under a sun shade. However, on more leisurely trips I would definitely pack and use this combination. If I find myself using this set-up often then I will likely purchase another set of Jake's Feet to eliminate the need for removing them from the tent.
      We were sleeping on deep snow on the second trip. I used trekking poles to stake out the vestibule in the snow since the stakes are too short to do much good in snow. Fortunately it wasn't windy to need to have the tent sides and corners staked down. With the fly completely closed down there was adequate wind protection. The skies were clear at night so the tent didn't see any snow loads.
      I was able to set up and take down the tent in cold temperatures while wearing thin gloves. It was easy to operate the attachments even when they were filled with snow, the plastic was frozen and my hands were a little cold.

      SUMMARY

      The NEMO Obi 2P tent is a well-constructed, well-designed two-person tent with great features while still being lightweight.
      Great:
      Lightweight for a double-walled tent
      Accurate weights advertised
      Two doors and vestibules
      Easy in
      Light pocket
      Compression stuff sack
      Not-so-great:
      A bit cramped for two people
      A little difficult to get out
      Side pocket lost contents overnight
      This concludes my Long-Term Test Report and this test series. Thanks to NEMO Equipment, Inc. and BackpackGearTest.org for allowing me to participate in this test.



      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Nancy Griffith
      Thanks Mike. Got it modified and uploaded and deleted the test file. It was nice working with you on this test. See you again on another I m sure. Happy trails
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 10, 2013
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        Thanks Mike. Got it modified and uploaded and deleted the test file.

        It was nice working with you on this test. See you again on another I'm sure.

        Happy trails

        Nancy

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Feb 10, 2013, at 9:03 AM, "Mike Mosack" <mosack@...> wrote:

        > Hi Nancy,
        > Just a couple of edits and you’re good to upload.
        >
        > Your edits are in the usual format -
        > EDIT – must change
        > edit – my recommended change if you agree
        > comment – just that
        > So, here we go...
        >
        > “This requires removing the Jake's Feet from the tent and then the pole, footprint and fly attach to the feet.”
        >
        > EDIT – This sentence is difficult to read as “footprint and fly attach to the feet” seems to be a disjointed thought that was added. I would either rewrite this or split it into two sentences.
        >
        > “With the fly completely closed down there was adequate wind protection.”
        >
        > edit – “down” is unnecessary and repetitive. I would just write, “With the fly completely closed there was adequate wind protection.”
        >
        > That’s it! Please remember to delete your test file copy.
        > It was good to be able to work with you during this test and I hope to see you again soon.
        > Mike
        >
        > From: Nancy Griffith
        > Sent: Monday, February 04, 2013 5:56 PM
        > To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com ; Mike Mosack
        > Subject: [backpackgeartesters] LTR: NEMO Obi 2p Tent- Nancy Griffith
        >
        > Hi Mike,
        >
        > I've posted my LTR to the test folder. Thanks in advance for providing the edits.
        >
        > My camera died during the test period but my phone managed to bail me out.
        >
        > Nancy
        >
        > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/LTR-%20NEMO%20Obi%20Tent-%20Nancy%20Griffith/
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/bjabu4m
        >
        >
        > LONG-TERM REPORT
        >
        > LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
        >
        > < >Over the Long-Term test period I used the tent for an additional two backpacking trips of three days each for four additional nights for a total of twelve nights. All uses were two-person with my husband sharing the tent with me. He is 5' 10 " (1.8 m) tall and weighs 165 lb (75 kg).
        > Backpacking:
        > Point Reyes National Seashore, California: 2 nights; 9.3 mi (15 km); 0 to 1,407 ft (429 m) elevation; overnight lows of 40 and 42 F (4 to 5 C); sunny to partly cloudy conditions.
        > Snowshoe Backpacking:
        > Loon Lake Trail, Sierra Nevada, California: 2 nights; 16.2 mi (26 km); elevation 6,327 to 7,030 ft (1,928 to 2,143 m); 22 to 50 F (-5 to 10 C); clear to cloudy conditions with light wind. Camping was on 4 ft (1.2 m) of packed snow.
        >
        > PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
        >
        > The tent continued to perform similarly to the Field Test period but I was able to snow camp and use the footprint/fly combination in sand during this test period.
        > < >On the Point Reyes coastal trip I had the opportunity to use the footprint and fly configuration. This requires removing the Jake's Feet from the tent and then the pole, footprint and fly attach to the feet. We had hiked to our campsite near the coast and decided to take it down to the beach for a peaceful afternoon since I wasn't feeling very well. The sun was shining and it was nice to have the fly as a shade. As I took a nap the wind kicked up significantly and the fly then provided some needed wind block. Eventually too much sand was blowing under as the wind increased and we decided to head back to camp.
        > I really like the option of setting up this way although it is a bit of a luxury. On most of my future trips, I probably won't choose to carry the footprint in order to keep my pack weight down and since I usually don't have time during the day for lounging under a sun shade. However, on more leisurely trips I would definitely pack and use this combination. If I find myself using this set-up often then I will likely purchase another set of Jake's Feet to eliminate the need for removing them from the tent.
        > We were sleeping on deep snow on the second trip. I used trekking poles to stake out the vestibule in the snow since the stakes are too short to do much good in snow. Fortunately it wasn't windy to need to have the tent sides and corners staked down. With the fly completely closed down there was adequate wind protection. The skies were clear at night so the tent didn't see any snow loads.
        > I was able to set up and take down the tent in cold temperatures while wearing thin gloves. It was easy to operate the attachments even when they were filled with snow, the plastic was frozen and my hands were a little cold.
        >
        > SUMMARY
        >
        > The NEMO Obi 2P tent is a well-constructed, well-designed two-person tent with great features while still being lightweight.
        > Great:
        > Lightweight for a double-walled tent
        > Accurate weights advertised
        > Two doors and vestibules
        > Easy in
        > Light pocket
        > Compression stuff sack
        > Not-so-great:
        > A bit cramped for two people
        > A little difficult to get out
        > Side pocket lost contents overnight
        > This concludes my Long-Term Test Report and this test series. Thanks to NEMO Equipment, Inc. and BackpackGearTest.org for allowing me to participate in this test.
        >
        >
        >
        > This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
        > Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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