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Re: FR - Dahlgren Socks - Jerr Adms

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  • jerry adams
    edited, uploaded, deleted   thanks for the edits   see you again in two months From: Kerri Larkin To: jerry adams
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 26, 2013
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      edited, uploaded, deleted
       
      thanks for the edits
       
      see you again in two months

      From: Kerri Larkin <kerrilarkin@...>
      To: jerry adams <jerryaadams@...>
      Cc: "BackpackGearTesters@yahoogroups.com" <BackpackGearTesters@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2013 5:06 PM
      Subject: Re: FR - Dahlgren Socks - Jerr Adms


      Hi Jerry,

      Thanks for an interesting FR. Only two edits for you, which follow the standard format. The HTML looks fine, so please go ahead and upload after the edits. Don't forget to delete your report from the test folder. See you in two months!

      I wore mid height waterproof-breathable boots and breathable gaiters over the socks:
      EDIT: please change "mid height" to "mid-height"

      I am very happy with he Dahlgren Backpacking socks.
      EDIT: please change 'he' to 'the'

      That's all I've got Jerry.

      Kind Regards,

      Kerri




      On 25/01/2013, at 3:36 AM, jerry adams <jerryaadams@...> wrote:

      http://tinyurl.com/becvk4f

      ><a name="FRPT">FIELD REPORT</a>

      >FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      >November 24, 2012 - 3 night backpack and 3 night car camp on the Deschutes River in North central Oregon.  I did 30 miles (48 km) of backpacking.   300 feet (100 m) of elevation gain.  Temperatures were 28 to 40 F (-2 to 4 C).
      >December 19, 2012 - 3 night backpack and 2 night car camp on the lower Deschutes River in North central Oregon.  I did 30 miles (48 km) of backpacking.  1600 feet (500 m) of elevation gain.  32 to 48 F (0 to 8 C).
      >January 15, 2013 - 4 night backpack and 1 night car camp on the beach of Olympic Peninsula in Northwest Washington.  43 miles (69 km).  1800 feet (550 m) elevation gain.  30 to 41 F (-1 to 5 C).  Clear skies.
      >I wore mid height waterproof-breathable boots and breathable gaiters over the socks:
      ><<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2">>

      >PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      >I have been very impressed with the Dahlgren Backpacking socks.
      >On the three trips I tested the socks on, I did mostly low elevation gain hiking but there was lots of short distance scrambling in and out of ravines on rough trails.  This causes more stress on my socks and feet.  It can cause wear on the socks, or my feet can get sore, but I didn't experience this at all.  I felt no hot spots.  The Dahlgrens were fairly thick so provided good comfort.
      >The temperature range I experienced was 28 to 48 F (-2 to 8C).  Not real hot or cold.  My feet were pretty warm all the time.
      >Regarding the wicking rings, I think maybe my socks were less damp at the end of the day than normal socks.  Maybe the wicking rings help some.  Maybe I should do an experiment - Dahlgren on one foot and normal sock on the other foot.  It wasn't really warm enough to test this real well.  It will probably be a little warmer during the Long Term test period.
      >The elastic tops kept the socks up without any uncomfortable constriction.
      >I also wore the socks over night.  They kept my feet warm and the slight dampness dried out by the next morning.  I also had booties on some of the cold nights.
      >After my last trip I washed the socks.  There is a little pilling, but it's just cosmetic.  The socks are still thick at the heels and sole.  When I washed the socks, I turned them inside out which is supposed to limit pilling.  I usually am too lazy to do this but I did for these socks.
      ><<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1">>
      >One thing I was worried about, was with all the zones, rings, and channels, there are lots of transitions between different materials.  This is an opportunity for failures.  I have seen this on other socks.  At the transition point, gaps will develop.  I haven't noticed this in the Dahlgrens.
      >So far I have hiked 103 miles (166 km), 16 nights, 3 washings.
      >

      >SUMMARY

      >I am very happy with he Dahlgren Backpacking socks.  They are on par with the best socks I have used in the past.
      >They are fairly thick so they're warm and comfortable.
      >They held up fine during the testing although there is more pilling than normal for socks with this amount of use.
      >I'm not sure about the wicking rings - whether they keep the socks drier because of wicking up to the ankles where water evaporates.  Maybe for the Long Term test I'll wear a regular sock on one foot and a Dahlgren on the other foot for one day to see if it makes any difference.
      >I'll do a similar amount of testing during the Long Term testing period, but it will probably be warmer with more elevation gain.
      >This concludes my Field Report.  Look forward to my Long Term Report in two months.  Thanks to Dahlgren Footwear, Inc. and BackpackGearTest.org for letting me test these.



      >This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      >Copyright 2013.  All rights reserved.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jerry adams
      oops   the data base says field report due   I just copied the IR back and will put FR stuff in LTR   no big deal From: Kathy Waters
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 26, 2013
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        oops
         
        the data base says field report due
         
        I just copied the IR back and will put FR stuff in LTR
         
        no big deal

        From: Kathy Waters <kathy@...>
        To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: kerrilarkin@...
        Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2013 4:56 PM
        Subject: RE: [backpackgeartesters] FR - Dahlgren Socks - Jerr Adms

         
        Jerry,

        Sorry about that but this is a two-report test. You can save your info for
        the LTR due in March, ok?

        Kathy

        From: mailto:backpackgeartesters%40yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:mailto:backpackgeartesters%40yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jerry adams
        Sent: Thursday, January 24, 2013 9:37 AM
        To: mailto:BackpackGearTesters%40yahoogroups.com; mailto:kerrilarkin%40yahoo.com
        Subject: [backpackgeartesters] FR - Dahlgren Socks - Jerr Adms

        http://tinyurl.com/becvk4f

        FIELD REPORT

        FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

        November 24, 2012 - 3 night backpack and 3 night car camp on the Deschutes
        River in North central Oregon. I did 30 miles (48 km) of backpacking. 300
        feet (100 m) of elevation gain. Temperatures were 28 to 40 F (-2 to 4 C).
        December 19, 2012 - 3 night backpack and 2 night car camp on the lower
        Deschutes River in North central Oregon. I did 30 miles (48 km) of
        backpacking. 1600 feet (500 m) of elevation gain. 32 to 48 F (0 to 8 C).
        January 15, 2013 - 4 night backpack and 1 night car camp on the beach of
        Olympic Peninsula in Northwest Washington. 43 miles (69 km). 1800 feet
        (550 m) elevation gain. 30 to 41 F (-1 to 5 C). Clear skies.
        I wore mid height waterproof-breathable boots and breathable gaiters over
        the socks:
        < >

        PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

        I have been very impressed with the Dahlgren Backpacking socks.
        On the three trips I tested the socks on, I did mostly low elevation gain
        hiking but there was lots of short distance scrambling in and out of ravines
        on rough trails. This causes more stress on my socks and feet. It can
        cause wear on the socks, or my feet can get sore, but I didn't experience
        this at all. I felt no hot spots. The Dahlgrens were fairly thick so
        provided good comfort.
        The temperature range I experienced was 28 to 48 F (-2 to 8C). Not real hot
        or cold. My feet were pretty warm all the time.
        Regarding the wicking rings, I think maybe my socks were less damp at the
        end of the day than normal socks. Maybe the wicking rings help some. Maybe
        I should do an experiment - Dahlgren on one foot and normal sock on the
        other foot. It wasn't really warm enough to test this real well. It will
        probably be a little warmer during the Long Term test period.
        The elastic tops kept the socks up without any uncomfortable constriction.
        I also wore the socks over night. They kept my feet warm and the slight
        dampness dried out by the next morning. I also had booties on some of the
        cold nights.
        After my last trip I washed the socks. There is a little pilling, but it's
        just cosmetic. The socks are still thick at the heels and sole. When I
        washed the socks, I turned them inside out which is supposed to limit
        pilling. I usually am too lazy to do this but I did for these socks.
        < >
        One thing I was worried about, was with all the zones, rings, and channels,
        there are lots of transitions between different materials. This is an
        opportunity for failures. I have seen this on other socks. At the
        transition point, gaps will develop. I haven't noticed this in the
        Dahlgrens.
        So far I have hiked 103 miles (166 km), 16 nights, 3 washings.


        SUMMARY

        I am very happy with he Dahlgren Backpacking socks. They are on par with
        the best socks I have used in the past.
        They are fairly thick so they're warm and comfortable.
        They held up fine during the testing although there is more pilling than
        normal for socks with this amount of use.
        I'm not sure about the wicking rings - whether they keep the socks drier
        because of wicking up to the ankles where water evaporates. Maybe for the
        Long Term test I'll wear a regular sock on one foot and a Dahlgren on the
        other foot for one day to see if it makes any difference.
        I'll do a similar amount of testing during the Long Term testing period, but
        it will probably be warmer with more elevation gain.
        This concludes my Field Report. Look forward to my Long Term Report in two
        months. Thanks to Dahlgren Footwear, Inc. and BackpackGearTest.org for
        letting me test these.



        This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
        Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kathy Waters
        Thanks, Jerry. I know that the Status field says Field Report Due because as soon as the IRs are complete, BridGeT automatically assumes the FR is next. But
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 26, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks, Jerry. I know that the Status field says Field Report Due because as soon as the IRs are complete, BridGeT automatically assumes the FR is next. But if you check the FR Due field you will see that there isn’t any date. Just an FYI for everyone <g>!



          At least you have a good start on the LTR, eh?



          Kathy



          From: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com [mailto:backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jerry adams
          Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2013 8:22 PM
          To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [backpackgeartesters] FR - Dahlgren Socks - Jerr Adms





          oops

          the data base says field report due

          I just copied the IR back and will put FR stuff in LTR

          no big deal

          From: Kathy Waters kathy@... <mailto:kathy%40backpackgeartest.com> >
          To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com <mailto:backpackgeartesters%40yahoogroups.com>
          Cc: kerrilarkin@... <mailto:kerrilarkin%40yahoo.com>
          Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2013 4:56 PM
          Subject: RE: [backpackgeartesters] FR - Dahlgren Socks - Jerr Adms


          Jerry,

          Sorry about that but this is a two-report test. You can save your info for
          the LTR due in March, ok?

          Kathy

          From: mailto:backpackgeartesters%40yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:mailto:backpackgeartesters%40yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jerry adams
          Sent: Thursday, January 24, 2013 9:37 AM
          To: mailto:BackpackGearTesters%40yahoogroups.com; mailto:kerrilarkin%40yahoo.com
          Subject: [backpackgeartesters] FR - Dahlgren Socks - Jerr Adms

          http://tinyurl.com/becvk4f

          FIELD REPORT

          FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

          November 24, 2012 - 3 night backpack and 3 night car camp on the Deschutes
          River in North central Oregon. I did 30 miles (48 km) of backpacking. 300
          feet (100 m) of elevation gain. Temperatures were 28 to 40 F (-2 to 4 C).
          December 19, 2012 - 3 night backpack and 2 night car camp on the lower
          Deschutes River in North central Oregon. I did 30 miles (48 km) of
          backpacking. 1600 feet (500 m) of elevation gain. 32 to 48 F (0 to 8 C).
          January 15, 2013 - 4 night backpack and 1 night car camp on the beach of
          Olympic Peninsula in Northwest Washington. 43 miles (69 km). 1800 feet
          (550 m) elevation gain. 30 to 41 F (-1 to 5 C). Clear skies.
          I wore mid height waterproof-breathable boots and breathable gaiters over
          the socks:
          < >

          PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

          I have been very impressed with the Dahlgren Backpacking socks.
          On the three trips I tested the socks on, I did mostly low elevation gain
          hiking but there was lots of short distance scrambling in and out of ravines
          on rough trails. This causes more stress on my socks and feet. It can
          cause wear on the socks, or my feet can get sore, but I didn't experience
          this at all. I felt no hot spots. The Dahlgrens were fairly thick so
          provided good comfort.
          The temperature range I experienced was 28 to 48 F (-2 to 8C). Not real hot
          or cold. My feet were pretty warm all the time.
          Regarding the wicking rings, I think maybe my socks were less damp at the
          end of the day than normal socks. Maybe the wicking rings help some. Maybe
          I should do an experiment - Dahlgren on one foot and normal sock on the
          other foot. It wasn't really warm enough to test this real well. It will
          probably be a little warmer during the Long Term test period.
          The elastic tops kept the socks up without any uncomfortable constriction.
          I also wore the socks over night. They kept my feet warm and the slight
          dampness dried out by the next morning. I also had booties on some of the
          cold nights.
          After my last trip I washed the socks. There is a little pilling, but it's
          just cosmetic. The socks are still thick at the heels and sole. When I
          washed the socks, I turned them inside out which is supposed to limit
          pilling. I usually am too lazy to do this but I did for these socks.
          < >
          One thing I was worried about, was with all the zones, rings, and channels,
          there are lots of transitions between different materials. This is an
          opportunity for failures. I have seen this on other socks. At the
          transition point, gaps will develop. I haven't noticed this in the
          Dahlgrens.
          So far I have hiked 103 miles (166 km), 16 nights, 3 washings.

          SUMMARY

          I am very happy with he Dahlgren Backpacking socks. They are on par with
          the best socks I have used in the past.
          They are fairly thick so they're warm and comfortable.
          They held up fine during the testing although there is more pilling than
          normal for socks with this amount of use.
          I'm not sure about the wicking rings - whether they keep the socks drier
          because of wicking up to the ankles where water evaporates. Maybe for the
          Long Term test I'll wear a regular sock on one foot and a Dahlgren on the
          other foot for one day to see if it makes any difference.
          I'll do a similar amount of testing during the Long Term testing period, but
          it will probably be warmer with more elevation gain.
          This concludes my Field Report. Look forward to my Long Term Report in two
          months. Thanks to Dahlgren Footwear, Inc. and BackpackGearTest.org for
          letting me test these.

          This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
          Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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