Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

FR - Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Daypack - Gail

Expand Messages
  • woodswoman
    Mike, Here is my FR for the Sea to Summit Daypack. Thanks in advance for the edits. Gail HTML: http://tinyurl.com/aeehwkx  Field Report: January 24, 2013 USA
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 24, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Mike,
      Here is my FR for the Sea to Summit Daypack. Thanks in advance for the edits. Gail

      HTML:

      http://tinyurl.com/aeehwkx


       Field Report:
      January 24, 2013

      USA Locations and Conditions

      During the field test period I have worn the Sea to Summit Dry Sil
            Day Pack for a variety of activities including cross country
            skiing, snowshoeing and day hiking. It was also used during a
            backcountry trip of three days. Location of all activities were in Michigan and ranged from hilly deciduous forest to
            open non-deciduous communities. Elevation ranged from 600 ft (183
            m) to almost 2000 ft (610 m).

      Late December Trip

      Location: Hiawatha National Forest, Upper Peninsula of Michigan
      Type of Trip: Trail
      Distance: 18 mi (29 km) 
      Length of Trip: 3 days/2 nights
      Sled Weight: Approx 40 lb (18 kg) 
      Sky and Air Conditions: Cloudy, snowstorms   
      Precipitation: Approx 6 in (15 cm) of new snow
      Temperature Range: 10 F to 24 F (-12 C to -4 C)

      Dayhikes/Snowshoeing

      Locations: Upper Peninsula of Michigan
      Distances: 4 mi to 6 mi (6.5 to 9.6 km) 
      Temperature Range: 15 F to 38 F (-9 C to 3 C)     


      During the field test
      period I have both worn and stowed the day pack as needed. For example it's been a handy pack to wear when carrying extra supplies for skiing. Lately the temps have been
      double digits below zero (-17 F/-27 C) with wind chills of -25 F (-32 C) or worse. These kind of conditions always make me a little more safety orientated than I already am. The pack is easily stuffed with a down sweater, emergency blanket and fire making essentials, personal locator
      beacon and more.

      When the conditions aren't as bad I have found the pack to be
          slightly a nuisance for fast cross country skate skiing. Water bottles are harder to
          retrieve and the extra weight on my back is more noticeable. I am mostly
          used to wearing a waist pack during skiing which doesn't interfere
          with my style much. That said, I have found the pack very
          handy to bring my extra gear plus ski boots to the ski trailhead or hut and leave
          the pack there while I am skiing (minus the ski boots of course).
          When I come back to the hut I take out dry socks, shirt, hat, etc as
          well as sometimes lunch from the pack. I like that the pack doesn't weigh much and
          I can wear it on my back to and from the parking area as I already have my arms full with skis
          and poles.  

      I have also stowed the pack on top of my sledge during a three-day
          trip. It contained all the necessary emergency supplies so that they
          were readily accessible. The sil-nylon material kept the contents
      dry and I had no hesitancy to place the pack on the ground when
      retrieving other items.

      Where the pack shines for me is for day hiking and snowshoeing. It is
          hardly noticeable for such activities as my forward motion doesn't hinder carrying a pack (unlike skate skiing where the torso is rotated). I like how the pack can be cinched and the top rolled down to hold supplies in place.

      So far the pack has held up well. I have not been picky about
          putting wet cross-country ski boots in the bottom of it plus other wet clothing at
          the end of a ski session. Of course I empty it out as soon as I get
          home so that no odors are noticeable. It has been carried in all kinds of winter weather including frigid cold and blustery snow storms without incident.

      I haven't bothered to use the stuff sack as the pack is small enough on
      its own already. I wasn't too keen on stuffing it in a tiny sack only to
      deploy it anyway on an almost daily basis. I have found the Sea to
      Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Daypack to be a useful and dependable addition to
      my outdoor activities.

      Pros SoFar


          *     Water-resistant
          *     Light weight
          *     Roll-top closure easy to use
       Cons SoFar


          *     Stuff sack is very tight so I haven't bothered to use it Tester Remarks

      Thanks to Sea to Summit  and BackpackGearTest for this opportunity to test the Ultra-Sil Dry Daypack .This concludes my Field Report. The Long Term Report will be appended to this report in approximately two months. Please check back then for more information.  

      Top of Page     


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • the_fish_guy
      Gail, Nice report! Below are just a few things for you before your upload. See you for the LTR! Mike These kind of conditions always make me a little
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 5, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Gail,

        Nice report! Below are just a few things for you before your upload. See you for the LTR!

        Mike

        <SNIP>

        These kind of conditions always make me a little more safety orientated than I already am.

        EDIT: These kinds . . .

        <SNIP>

        When I come back to the hut I take out dry socks, shirt, hat, etc as well as sometimes lunch from the pack.

        EDIT: etc., (it's an abbreviation, and I think a comma following it sets the clause off a bit better)

        <END>
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.