Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

FR Chaco Tedinho Boots - L Pontious

Expand Messages
  • Lori Pontious
    derek, Here is my FR for the boots. URL: http://tinyurl.com/adykoy6 Text: Field Report Field Conditions I wore the boots on a rainy day search for airplane
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 22, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      derek,

      Here is my FR for the boots.

      URL: http://tinyurl.com/adykoy6

      Text:


      Field Report

      Field Conditions

      I wore the boots on a rainy day search for airplane parts with the Fresno County Search and Rescue Team. It was about 45 F (7 C) and cloudy with occasional showers as I walked, stomped, fought and tripped through manzanita and white thorn bushes. I also wore mountaineering gaiters and rain pants.

      I wore the Tedinhos on an overnight trip to Pat Springs in Los Padres National Forest, hiking into the Ventana Wilderness. The day temperatures ranged from 35 - 55 F (2 - 13 C) and at night it dropped as low as 23 F (-5 C). The trails were muddy and slippery in places. There was no rain or snow while we were out there for three days enjoying sunsets from the ridge top. We hiked 16 miles (26 kilometers) total.

      I wore the boots on a two day/one night visit to Case Mountain, near Three Rivers, California, in Sequoia National Forest. This was a strenuous 20 miles (32 kilometers) with 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) of elevation gain. Night time low temperature was around 35 F (2 C) and day temperatures ranged from 55 - 60 F (13 - 15 C). We camped on top of the mountain under clear skies with a great view of the central valley of California.

      I rang in the New Year with friends on a four day backpacking trip in Point Reyes National Seashore, along the Pacific Coast in California. We started out under cloud cover and ended with clear skies. Night temperatures dropped as low as 22 F (-6 C) and during the day we enjoyed hiking in 60 - 65 F (15 - 18 C) temperatures. Trails tended to be very wet and muddy except where the drainage was good. Sometimes the trail was the drainage! Apparently the area received 9 inches (23 centimeters) of rain earlier that week. We hiked from Palomarin trailhead to Bear Valley for a total distance of 22 miles (35 kilometers).

      I also wore the boots on a muddy day hike on a friend's cattle ranch to Mt Owens in Prather, California. We were cross country for most of the hike up hills and down gullies through wet grass, rocky terrain, and bogs where cattle had been lounging. We hiked 11 miles (18 kilometers) on a clear, cool day.

      Field Report

      I experimented with the insoles by using the ones that came with the boots, then used blue Superfeet, then put the stock insoles back in and the blue Superfeet on top of them. There's a lot of space in the boot and my flat feet weren't filling it. After my first hike with the boots, I developed a huge blister on one heel. My feet were experiencing too much up-and-down motion, and some scar tissue on that heel rubbed itself right off! After adding a second insole, I kept hiking with the boots, and have had no more problems.

      I've put a lot of mud and wear on the Tedinhos. Wading through white thorn and other low brush in the process of grid searching wasn't easy, and my socks wet out even with rain pants over gaiters - I initially thought it was rain soaking through the tongue of the boot, perhaps around the stitching. But I have since walked through 4 inches (10 centimeters) of cold water while hiking in Point Reyes on trails that were still under runoff from heavy rain, and no water got into the boots. Sustained contact with water-soaked brambles and brush pushing up the cuffs of my rain pants must have soaked my hiking pants, which then wicked water down into my socks and boots - I've had this happen with gaiters before.

      I've been in a few slippery spots that I lost traction on - one of them on grass, in a steep downhill part of the trail trying to get to a beach in Point Reyes. I sat down rather hard and sprained my dignity. On gravel or dirt, I have had no issues with traction. On smooth, rounded, wet rock I slid a few times.

      The laces have continued to remain tied as I've wanted them through the miles, and I appreciate that. The soles still look like new, other than being dirty. The leather is starting to look scuffed. I have been washing the boots and letting them dry, and using leather conditioner to keep them from drying out and cracking. Since I've been using them in a lot of water and mud, I've tried to do this every couple of weeks.

      IMAGE
      I like the durability of the boot. I still am not a huge fan of boots, and prefer trail runners, but the Tedinhos have been comfortable and kept my feet dry in some really wet conditions. They're lighter than I anticipated. Overall, my experience with these boots has been positive and I can find nothing to dislike about them.

      Thanks to Wolverine World Wide, Inc. and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to test the Chaco Tedinho Waterproof Boots. Please come back in two months when I post my Long Term Report.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Derek Hansen
      Lori, Thanks for posting your report. Only a few minor edits and you re good to upload. Best, ~derek ... Edit: Using a hypen as a range separator is
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 23, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Lori,

        Thanks for posting your report. Only a few minor edits and you're good to upload.

        Best,

        ~derek


        On Jan 23, 2013, at 12:57 AM, Lori Pontious <lori.pontious@...> wrote:

        > The day temperatures ranged from 35 - 55 F (2 - 13 C)

        Edit: Using a hypen as a range separator is problematic with temperature because it is easily misunderstood as negative temperatures. I recommend using "to" instead to improve clarity. Multiple instances.

        > I sat down rather hard and sprained my dignity.

        Comment: Those sprains often hurt the most :)
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.