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EDIT/approval FR - NEMO Obi 2P - Andrei Girenkov

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  • Mike Mosack
    Hi Andrei, Nice photos – I especially like the one where you show the see-thru mesh (through two layers) J Here are your edits in the usual format – EDIT
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 26, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Andrei,

      Nice photos – I especially like the one where you show the see-thru mesh (through two layers) J

      Here are your edits in the usual format –

      EDIT – must change

      edit – My recommended change “if” you agree

      comment – just that

      I found a few edits for you, but I liked your report. See you on the next one

      Mike

      “I would like to thank both NEMO Equipment Inc and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to test
      this product. “

      EDIT – Please remove this from your Initial Report now that you’ve completed the Field Report. You can then add the version of this line at the end of the Field Report instead.

      “One trip was to the Sawtooth ridge in the Adirondack mountains, the second to Minnewaska state park, and the third to the Catskill mountains.”

      EDIT – Please capitalize “Ridge”, “State Park”, and both uses of “Mountains” as each are being used as part of the proper noun/name of the specific areas you refer to.



      “The temperature dropped below freezing on a single night in my October trip.”

      edit – I would replace “in” with “during” my October trip.


      “In order to minimize the weight of the tent, NEMO designers have eliminated material or substituted a light weight alternative wherever possible.”

      EDIT - lightweight



      “I carried it without a rain fly because of the fair weather.”

      EDIT – rainfly



      “Sleeping in it felt very open - as if I was was lying without a tent at all.”

      EDIT – Remove the extra “was”



      “Here is an overhead view of my Thermarest Neo Air regular size centered inside the tent. It is 20 in (51 cm) wide.”

      EDIT – “Therm-a-Rest” as it is a trade-marked name.

      edit - Additionally, I would change the wording as it seems a little confusing to read. I would offer maybe writing it this way – “Here is an overhead view of my regular-sized (20 in or 51 cm wide) Therm-a-Rest Neo Air which is centered inside the tent.”



      “In this configuration, there is great ventilation and no condensations whatsoever.”

      EDIT – “condensation”, not condensations…



      “I do have a concern about the interior room if used as a two person tent.”

      EDIT – “two-person”



      “In the next set of tests I plan to test…”

      Comment – Plans often change or circumstances occur that sometimes make it impossible or impractical to adhere to plans. It is usually safer to not publish your intentions and instead only report on your actual findings once your tests are complete.



      That’s it, so upload when you’re ready and please remember to delete the test copy.

      Mike


      From: agirenkov
      Sent: Tuesday, December 25, 2012 1:00 PM
      To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [backpackgeartesters] FR - NEMO Obi 2P - Andrei Girenkov


      Link here:

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR%20-%20NEMO%20Obi%202P%20-%20Andrei%20Girenkov/

      Text:

      Home Welcome agirenkov - Status: member
      Reviews > test > TESTS > FR - NEMO Obi 2P - Andrei Girenkov

      NEMO OBI 2P TENT
      TEST SERIES BY ANDREI GIRENKOV
      FIELD REPORT
      December 25, 2012

      CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO THE FIELD REPORT

      TESTER INFORMATION

      NAME: Andrei Girenkov
      EMAIL: agirenkov[AT]yahoo[DOT]com
      AGE: 30
      LOCATION: New York, New York, USA
      GENDER: M
      HEIGHT: 5' 10" (1.78 m)
      WEIGHT: 150 lb (68.00 kg)
      I have been backpacking for 6 years, mostly 3-season weekend trips in the Adirondacks, and other parks in the Northeastern US. Additionally, I try to take at least one 5-7 day trip each summer to other destinations in Canada, Western United States and Central America. I use lightweight gear on a budget. My multi-day pack weight is around 20-25 lb (9-11kg). I enjoy sleeping comfortably and cooking a hot meal at night

      INITIAL REPORT
      PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS

      Manufacturer: NEMO Equipment Inc.
      Year of Manufacture: 2012
      Manufacturer's Website: http://www.nemoequipment.com/
      MSRP: Tent: $389.95, Footprint: $49.95

      Listed Weight:
      Minimum tent weight (just tent body, fly, poles): 3 lb 0 oz (1360 g)
      Packed weight (everything included in the package): 3 lb 10 oz (1644 g)
      Footprint: 8.6 oz (245 g)

      Tent packed in its compression sack.

      Measured Weight:
      Tent realistically packed (body, fly, poles, guy lines, stakes, repair kit, stuff sacks): 3 lb 6.6 oz (1605 g)
      Footprint: 8.6 oz (245 g)

      Listed Interior Height: 40 in (102 cm)
      Listed Floor Dimensions 84 x 50 in (213 x 127 cm)
      Verified Accurate

      Listed Area: 27 sq ft (2.5 sq m)
      Listed Vestibules Area: 18 sq ft (1.7 sq m)
      Listed Packed Size: 7.5 in length x 6 in diameter (19 x 15 cm)
      Measured Packed Size (after opening and repacking): 10.5 x 6.5 in (27 x 16.5 cm)

      Fly / Vestibule Fabric: 20D Polyurethane Treated Nylon
      Floor Fabric: 30D Polyurethane Treated Nylon
      Footprint Fabric: 70D Polyurethane Treated Nylon

      Manufacturer's Description:

      NEMO bills the Obi tent as a lightweight, carefully designed, "finely tuned instruments." The company states that every piece of material utilized serves for a purpose, and not an extra ounce of weight was used to accomplish this task.

      INITIAL IMPRESSIONS

      The package included 3 stuff sacks which contained the main NEMO Obi 2P Tent (hereafter called Obi 2P or simply the tent), the poles, and a footprint.

      The first thing that struck me was the small size of the tent itself. As you can see from the photograph, the initial size of the compressed tent is about as long as a men's size 10 US (44 EU) shoe and about twice as wide. The tent poles came in an elongated stuff sack that physically clips to the tent's compression sack.

      The manufacturer was kind enough to include a footprint as well in a separate mesh bag. This accessory normally retails for an additional $50. It weighs in at a hefty 8.6 oz (245 g) - a significant portion of the overall weight given the manufacturer's stated goal of not wasting a single ounce.

      TRYING IT OUT

      Hub and Clip

      The Obi 2P uses a pole and hub system. The poles now are GREEN anodized DAC Featherlite NSL. DAC describes this as a new process for anodizing poles that minimizes the use of toxic chemicals. The center pole extends to a hub at each end. Two poles extend from each hub to the corners of the tent, forming an elongated X.

      The poles end in a small metal ball which goes into a socket at each corner of the tent. Once the poles are erected, the tent clips to them with plastic twist clips. The twist makes it very easy to clip on, and the shape forces the pole into the deepest part of the hook so they don't slide down. Here is a photo of the initial tent setup and a closeup of a pole hub with an attached twist clip.

      At each corner of the tent is a mechanism called a "Jake's Foot". It is designed to allow the poles, fly and footprint to quickly and securely attach to the tent. This is quite a handy mechanism once you know how to use it, however the instructions it comes with are limited to 4 pictures without any words, akin to IKEA assembly instructions. After about 10 minutes of fumbling about with the fly and the foot print I had to watch a video online to see how to use it.

      The Jake's foot without any attachments is pictured below. The poles snap into the ball socket in the middle of the Jake's foot. Then the fly snaps into place with the little hook facing down on the outermost cross member of the Jake's foot. Then the footprint snaps in with the hook facing up on the innermost cross member.

      Fully Attached Jake's Foot

      Empty Jake's Foot

      The floor of the Obi 2P is made of lightweight 30D Polyurethane (PU) nylon. An optional 70D PU nylon footprint can be attached below. The walls are ultra lightweight 20D PU nylon for the first half up from the floor and then a switch to a No-See-Um polyester mesh. There are two wide D-shaped doors. NEMO provides a loop and toggle to secure each door so it doesn't flap in the breeze when open. There is a single very small storage pocket behind one of the doors.

      The green rain fly is made of the same ultral ightweight 20D PU nylon as the walls. As mentioned above, it snaps to the tent via a Jake's Foot in each corner. The fly has two vestibules with D-shaped doors and storm flaps over the zippers. The Vestibules are very roomy, which I believe will come in very handy given the tight dimensions of this tent. The fly does not extend all the way to the ground on all sides. On the head end of the tent the fly stops half way down the walls, covering only the mesh portion. This allows the tent to ventilate. There are no other vents on the fly itself.

      Initial Set Up

      SUMMARY

      NEMO set out to make a compact, lightweight and comfortable two-person tent, in which every detail serves a purpose. The initial impression is that they succeeded at least on the first two counts, particularly on packed size. The tent shaves a pound of weight and about 50% of packed size from my current ultra light tent that was state of the art when I bought it 6 years ago. The instructions for the new Jake's Foot system are not obvious at first glance. However setup became very simple and quick once I looked at an instructional video online. The jury is still out on the comfort of this tent. I hope to answer that question in the Field and Long Term Reports.

      I would like to thank both NEMO Equipment Inc and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to test
      this product.

      FIELD REPORT
      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      I took the NEMO Obi 2P Tent out on three weekend trips in late September and early October in upstate New York. One trip was to the Sawtooth ridge in the Adirondack mountains, the second to Minnewaska state park, and the third to the Catskill mountains. The weather was mild and sunny on all three trips. Daytime temperatures were around 50 F (10 C). The temperature dropped below freezing on a single night in my October trip.

      In order to minimize the weight of the tent, NEMO designers have eliminated material or substituted a light weight alternative wherever possible. Case in point, more than half of the body of the tent is made from a mesh material. While this provides for great ventilation, and a beautiful view of the stars on a clear night, it also limits the temperature range when the tent can be used. Based on my initial three field tests, I decided not to use the tent for later November and December trips.

      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      You can clearly see the foliage through two layers of mesh.
      Let me start off by saying that for the weather conditions of my field test, the tent was just about perfect. It was extremely light and compact and very well ventilated. I carried it without a rain fly because of the fair weather. Sleeping in it felt very open - as if I was was lying without a tent at all. The mesh disappeared into the night sky, and the moon and stars were my roof!

      This setup worked out very well for all but my last night outside, when the temperature dipped below freezing. Without a fly, it was very cold, even with a 20 F (-7 C) rated sleeping bag. Largely for this reason, I didn't bring the tent on subsequent hikes in late November, when the temperatures were consistently below freezing. In early spring I plan to take the tent out again in cold weather to see if adding the rain fly helps retain the heat.

      One aspect of this tent that users should be aware of is its small size. This version of the Obi is advertised as a two person tent. Two people could technically fit inside, however it would be one very cozy night! Here is an overhead view of my Thermarest Neo Air regular size centered inside the tent. It is 20 in (51 cm) wide. When I sleep on my back, I occupy the entire width of the pad. I could barely fit two of them inside the tent side by side, and sleeping on either one required touching the wall of the tent with most my body. Without a fly this was not an issue. In a future test I will try such an arrangement with the fly on to see if condensation becomes an issue. With two people inside this tent there is no room for any personal items other than what will fit under your pillow or inside the single pocket.

      The good news is that this tent is light enough to be carried on a solo trip. For a single sleeper, it felt like my own personal Taj Mahal. There was a lot of room on both sides of my sleeping bag for a flashlight, book, clothes and other personal items as well as plenty of headroom above me. On these trips I left my pack and shoes unprotected outside overnight. In my next test I would like to check if there is enough space in the vestibule to keep my pack, or if I have to sacrifice more internal space.

      Single or double wide? You be the judge.

      A solo Taj Mahal!

      SUMMARY

      This is a very light tent. This advantage is enhanced even further by the ability to leave the rain fly at home and save another pound or so. In this configuration, there is great ventilation and no condensations whatsoever. Additionally, all the materials and construction are topnotch. There are no loose threads or seams, and the footprint, tent, and fly line up perfectly with each other for quick and easy assembly.

      I do have a concern about the interior room if used as a two person tent. It is spacious for one person, but becomes cramped if two people are sleeping inside. Additionally the no-fly configuration becomes too cold once temperature drops below freezing.

      In the next set of tests I plan to test the configuration with the rain fly attached. Specifically I will observe whether there is adequate room in the vestibule, whether condensation becomes an issue, and whether the rain fly allows this tent to be used in lower temperatures comfortably.





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