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IR - Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Daypack - Alex Legg

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  • alex
    Here is my IR for this fun looking daypack. The HTML is at http://tinyurl.com/atbgc5a The text is below. Thank you for your time and edits! Sea to Summit
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 22, 2012
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      Here is my IR for this fun looking daypack. The HTML is at http://tinyurl.com/atbgc5a
      The text is below. Thank you for your time and edits!


      Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Daypack
      Test Series by Alex Legg
      Initial Report November 23rd, 2012


      Tester Information:
      Name:  Alex Legg
      Age:  30
      Gender:  Male
      Height:  6'4" (1.9 m)
      Weight:  195 lb (88 kg)
      Email address:  alexlegg2 AT yahoo DOT com
      City, State, Country:  Tucson, Arizona, USA

      I grew up backpacking in the Rockies.   I hike ranges throughout Arizona and Colorado year round.  I carry a light pack, mostly water.  I prefer a tarp shelter to my heavier 2-person tent.  I do many day hikes and I also spend as many as 5 days out at a time.  Temperatures range from below freezing to above 100 F (38 C), and elevations from 2,000 ft to 14,000 ft (610 m to 4,300 m).  I bag a mountain almost every weekend, and I walk my dogs 4 miles daily through deep sand and overgrown mesquite trees in our local washes.

      Initial Report:

      Product Information and Specifications:

      Manufacturer: Sea to Summit
      Year of Manufacture: 2012
      URL: http://www.seatosummit.com
      Material: Ultra-Sil Cordura Fabric; Hypalon roll-top closure
      Listed Weight: 3.2 oz (90 g)
      Measured Weight: 3.6 oz (102 g)
      Stuff Sack Weight: 0.25 oz (7 g)
      Volume: 22 Liters (1,343 cu in)
      Listed Dimensions in Stuff Sack:
      Measured Dimensions in Stuff Sack:
      Color: Black with Grey trim
      MSRP: N/A

      Product Description and Initial Impressions

      I was shocked to see how small the Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Daypack was while packed in the stuff sack. It is still hard to wrap my head around the idea that a pack can stuff down so tiny. The clip on the stuff sack looks like it would make hanging the stuff sack easy. I could see myself clipping it to a larger pack or to a hook in my car.

      As I pulled the pack out of the stuff sack I was very careful to remember how it was folded so that I could get it back into the stuff sack. I unfolded the pack, feeling the slick, smooth surface of the Ultra-Sil Cordura fabric. I have used Sea to Summit products made with this material before and I am impressed by there slick feel and water resistance. Although this pack is small and lightweight, the material feels pretty strong when I pull on it. I can see the cross-stitched pattern on the fabric when I look closely. I assume this adds strength to the pack.

      I also see many double stitched seams that the manufacture claims are fully tape sealed. They say that the high density PU seam tape as well as the Cordura fabric make for a water resistant feature unless the pack is fully submerged. My experience in the past with this material reminds me that water from a light rain will just bead up on the surface of the fabric.

      The color of the pack I am testing is black with grey trim. The Sea to Summit logo is printed vertically along the left portion of the front of the pack. Across from the logo, a tag reading Cordura Brand Fabric is located. Under this tag is another smaller tag clarifying that the pack is made in China.

      The shoulder straps are smaller than any other pack I own, and made from the same material as the rest of the pack. They are about 2 in (51 mm) thick at the top and get progressively smaller to about 1/2 in (13 mm) thick as they get toward the bottom. They connect at the the bottom to a small strip of nylon 1/4 in (6 mm) thick. The nylon weaves through a small plastic adjustment piece where I can adjust the straps to my desired length. A small nylon loop is mounted in the middle of the two shoulder straps at the top of the pack. I supposed I could hang the pack by this loop, but I am honestly surprised to see such a lightweight pack having this extra weight feature.

      Along the front of the pack is the reflective compression lacing system. It crisscrosses diagonally down the front of the pack. I foresee this having multiple uses from storing my water containers to possibly an extra layer of clothing. There is a small clasp at the top of the lacing system to allow me to cinch down the laces while stowing items.

      The double Hypalon strip at the opening of the compartment creates the roll-top feature of the pack. Writing on it tells me that it must be rolled at least 4 times and buckled to make the seal. The plastic clips are small, only about 1 in (25 mm) thick, but they feel pretty durable. Inside the compartment there is a snap that I can connect the stuff sack to in order to create a makeshift pocket.

      Trying it out:

      After fully inspecting the pack, I made my first attempt at folding it tightly to pack it back into the stuff sack. I tried to mimic the way it had originally came, but I had no luck. I unrolled the pack and tried another time with the same result. Then I decided to try a different method and just couldn't get it to fit. At this point I figured the pack would never go back into its home inside the stuff sack. After going back and forth with the pack at least ten tries, I got everything to fit in except one of the clips. That looked good enough for me and I set it aside. Later when I pulled the pack out again to show some friends I had similar results while attempting to repack. This time it only took me about four or five tries and I got the entire pack to fit in nicely. For me, it is not an easy feat to get the pack back into the stuff sack, but since I am getting better already I would imagine that I will have it down before too long.

      As excited as I was to get out and use the pack, I had to wait a day before I got the chance. I quickly stuffed a base layer, some food and water, and a few first aide items inside and set out with my dogs. We only trekked about 3 or 4 miles before we had to come home, but I still got a chance to get an idea of how the pack felt.

      I have my concerns about the small shoulder straps possibly becoming uncomfortable if the pack is loaded to its full capacity. Without the assistance of a hip belt to counter some of the weight, the shoulder straps feel as though they may dig into my body a bit.

      Summary:

      I am very excited to get out and use this pack. Day hikes and peak bagging are some of my favorite things. I will take it on many day hikes and also on some backpacking trips where I will primarily use it as a summit pack. I am impressed by the lightweight and strong feeling fabric and hope I get to see how it holds up to water. My biggest curiosity with this pack is wether or not I can use it for an ultralight overnight pack. It seems like it would be tight, but I will give it a go and report back for my field report.

      Things I like:

      1. Lightweight
      2. Water resistant
      3. Simple design

      Concerns:

      1. Shoulder straps may dig into my skin
      2. Not easy for me to re pack into the stuff sack
    • the_fish_guy
      Alex, Sorry for the delay . . . I missed the email showing this as my test. Below are your edits. Mike Listed Dimensions in Stuff Sack: Measured
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 29, 2012
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        Alex,

        Sorry for the delay . . . I missed the email showing this as my test.

        Below are your edits.

        Mike

        <SNIP>

        Listed Dimensions in Stuff Sack:
        Measured Dimensions in Stuff Sack:

        Edit: Either include the data, or delete these lines.

        Product Description and Initial Impressions

        I have used Sea to Summit products made with this material before and I am impressed by there slick feel and water resistance.

        EDIT: their slick feel . . .

        The shoulder straps are smaller than any other pack I own, and made from the same material as the rest of the pack. They are about 2 in (51 mm) thick at the top and get progressively smaller to about 1/2 in (13 mm) thick as they get toward the bottom.

        Edit/Comment: Just to clarify, do you really mean 2 inches thick, or is it two inches wide at the top?

        They connect at the the bottom to a small strip of nylon
        1/4 in (6 mm) thick.

        EDIT: Delete the redundant "the" before "bottom"

        As excited as I was to get out and use the pack, I had to wait a day before I got the chance. I quickly stuffed a base layer, some food and water, and a few first aide items inside and set out with my dogs.

        EDIT: First aid

        My biggest curiosity with this pack is wether or not I
        can use it for an ultralight overnight pack.

        EDIT: whether or not (spelling)

        2. Not easy for me to re pack into the stuff sack

        Edit: delete space between re and pack (repack is ok)
      • alex
        Mike, Thank you for your edits! Sorry to take up your time with basic grammar and spelling issues, but I suppose that s why we have you editors. I have made
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 29, 2012
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          Mike,
          Thank you for your edits! Sorry to take up your time with basic grammar and spelling issues, but I suppose that's why we have you editors. I have made all corrections and posted to the BGT site. See you in a couple months.

          -Alex Legg

          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "the_fish_guy" <thefishguy@...> wrote:
          >
          > Alex,
          >
          > Sorry for the delay . . . I missed the email showing this as my test.
          >
          > Below are your edits.
          >
          > Mike
          >
          > <SNIP>
          >
          > Listed Dimensions in Stuff Sack:
          > Measured Dimensions in Stuff Sack:
          >
          > Edit: Either include the data, or delete these lines.
          >
          > Product Description and Initial Impressions
          >
          > I have used Sea to Summit products made with this material before and I am impressed by there slick feel and water resistance.
          >
          > EDIT: their slick feel . . .
          >
          > The shoulder straps are smaller than any other pack I own, and made from the same material as the rest of the pack. They are about 2 in (51 mm) thick at the top and get progressively smaller to about 1/2 in (13 mm) thick as they get toward the bottom.
          >
          > Edit/Comment: Just to clarify, do you really mean 2 inches thick, or is it two inches wide at the top?
          >
          > They connect at the the bottom to a small strip of nylon
          > 1/4 in (6 mm) thick.
          >
          > EDIT: Delete the redundant "the" before "bottom"
          >
          > As excited as I was to get out and use the pack, I had to wait a day before I got the chance. I quickly stuffed a base layer, some food and water, and a few first aide items inside and set out with my dogs.
          >
          > EDIT: First aid
          >
          > My biggest curiosity with this pack is wether or not I
          > can use it for an ultralight overnight pack.
          >
          > EDIT: whether or not (spelling)
          >
          > 2. Not easy for me to re pack into the stuff sack
          >
          > Edit: delete space between re and pack (repack is ok)
          >
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