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Re: [backpackgeartesters] FILE DELETE ASSISTANCE: LTR-SEAT TO SUMMIT ULTRA-SIL VIEW DRYSACK-STEVE KIDD

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  • Nancy Griffith
    Hi Steve,   It has been deleted.  Ready for upload.   Nancy ________________________________ From: ftroop94 To:
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 9, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Steve,
       
      It has been deleted.  Ready for upload.
       
      Nancy


      ________________________________
      From: ftroop94 <ftroop94@...>
      To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, October 9, 2012 4:41 AM
      Subject: [backpackgeartesters] FILE DELETE ASSISTANCE: LTR-SEAT TO SUMMIT ULTRA-SIL VIEW DRYSACK-STEVE KIDD


       
      Hello,

      Would a moderator be able to delete my Initial Report on the above product, so I can post the LTR. I suppose this may be a minor glitch in the two report system?

      Thanks in advance,

      ~SMK

      --- In mailto:backpackgeartesters%40yahoogroups.com, "ftroop94" <ftroop94@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ralph,
      >
      > LOVE the drysacks! Could have added some frivalous filler to make the report longer, but simply they rock. Let me know what to work on.
      >
      > ~SMK
      >
      > HTML:
      >
      > http://alturl.com/o554u
      >
      > OR
      >
      > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/LTR-SEA%20TO%20SUMMIT%20VIEW%20DRYSACK-STEVE%20KIDD/
      >
      > TEXT:
      >
      > LONG-TERM REPORT
      >
      > LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
      >
      > <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1" IMAGE CAPTION = "Bear Island Group Hammock Hang">>25 - 26 May, 2012: I again camped with my children, but this was in the wooded areas of my family farm near Straightstone, Virginia. Elevations were approximately 625 ft (190 m) and temperatures ranged from 69 F (20 C) to 86 F (30 C) conditions were dry but not humid and the ticks were out in force.
      >
      > 27 - 28 May, 2012: A public island on Smith Mountain Lake in southwest Virginia. Conditions were continued to be dry with temperatures ranging from 70 F (21 C) to 89 F (32 C). Normal pond for the lake is around 794 ft (242 m). We motored to the island by pontoon and I did have the fortune of adding my wife to the crew this evening. She took to the ground with the kids in our 3 - person tent and I labored above in my hammock.
      >
      > 14 -15 July, 2012: Long Hunter State Park, Hermitage, Tennessee. This was a two-day and one-night outing that covered 11 mi (18 km) along the 5.5 mi (9 km) Volunteer Trail that emerges on J. Percy Priest Lake. The high elevation of the park is 522 ft (159 m). Temperatures were humid and oppressing with highs around 95 F (35 C) during the day and a low around 87 F (31 C) at night. There was no moisture at all on the outing.
      >
      > 10 - 12 August, 2012: Bear Island on J. Percy Priest Lake. The island is a fifteen minute paddle from Anderson Boat Ramp, in Davidson, Tennessee (a part of the Metropolitan Nashville Area). Lake elevation at full summer pond is 490 ft (149 m) and I hammock camped less than twenty yards from shore on this three-day and two-night outing. Temperatures were amazing and dry; they averaged no higher than 82 F (28 C) during the day and dipped to as low as 59 F (15 C) on the second night. No true mileage was covered on this outing as it was a "Group Hang" of hammock campers from the middle Tennessee area and mostly involved water sports and fishing.
      >
      > 15 - 16 September, 2012: King's Chapel Pond, Arrington, Tennessee. I couldn't get the kids to the woods, so I took the woods to them. Our neighborhood has over 300 acres of untouched farm and hunting land that allowed us to take a short .75 m (1.2 km) hike to a well established irrigation pond on the farm. The elevation is 767 ft (234 m) and the temperatures were in the mid 60's F (18 C) and dipped to 48 (9 C) during the evening. There was very heavy dew when we awoke the next morning. In fact, it was wet enough to cause my 5 year old daughter to think it had rained overnight.
      >
      >
      > PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
      >
      > During the testing phase I truly believe I put the Ultra-Sil View Dry Sacks through a thorough test, and I've been impressed with them. They are designed to keep gear dry within the confines of a backpack, but I often used them without such protection. Early on I used them on two dive trips to keep gear and electronic equipment dry. There was a plenty of sea spray and everything remained perfectly dry. I also used them on a trip to the beach and several backpacking and camping outings on various lakes in Virginia and Tennessee.
      > <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2" IMAGE CAPTION = "The View's in Virginia Clover">>
      > Most of the five backpacking and camping outings I used the dry sacks on were rain free, but they were still given plenty of opportunity to experience moisture! On the final outing, just before bed my children changed into fresh clothing and I stuffed their dirty garments into a sack and set it just outside the tent vestibule. Although not planned, it was a fortuitous way to test the product since very heavy dew fell in the early morning hours. The tent fly was wet enough to have tricked someone into thinking it had rained, and the dry sack was covered in moisture. I opened the sack and the clothing was dry.
      >
      > Although they are not designed to be submerged, I pushed the limits a handful of times on my water related outings. Once I submerged a sack for well over a minute to learn that it didn't allow moisture to penetrate to the interior.
      >
      > When I first received the sacks with the view panel I honestly thought it was a little bit of a gimmick, but in retrospect it really was helpful in quickly identifying the items I needed when on the trail. The minimal weight penalty of 0.18 oz (5 g) between this 13 L sack and the same Sea To Summit Sack I have with no viewing panel is not enough to discourage me from using it in the future. I can be a gram weenie, but I'll take the five for the convenience it gives me.
      >
      > There really is not a great deal more to say about the sacks other than that I love them and plan to continue to use them in the future. In fact in late September, I was at an outdoor store in Portland, Maine, and I overheard a customer discussing the Sea To Summit eVent sacks with an employee. His key use appeared to centered on backpacking, so I picked up one of the View sacks and told them both I'd been using these for a few months and they might be the perfect solution. I have two eVent sacks and love them as well, but to be able to get three 13 L sacks for roughly the same weight as one comparable eVent easily causes me to steer toward the View sacks.
      >
      >
      >
      > SUMMARY
      >
      > <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 3" IMAGE CAPTION = "Gratuitous 'Toe Sucking' pic on Smith Mountain Lake">>
      > Just like with every product I've ever used from Sea To Summit, I am impressed with the Ultra-Sil View Dry Sack. The company is ever evolving in their research and development, and I continue to be impressed with the items they bring to market. I own no less than seven dry sacks from this manufacturer at this point, and I at one point I was considering acquiring an Ultra-Sil pack liner. I'm so impressed with the organization these current sacks afford me at a minimal weight penalty that I don't see myself doing so at this point.
      >
      > My only suggestion to the company is to research and see if a compression sack using this material would be feasible. Heck, they may already have done the research. There are times I would like to compress items like down, and as much as I love my aforementioned eVent sacks, it is tough for this gram weenie to go back that far north on weight. I know a compression sack of this nature would be heavier, but I wouldn't believe it would be drastic.
      >
      > My roses and thorns are unchanged from my initial report. I love the lightweight, waterproof nature of the product and the view panel really helps. I do continue to suggest adding a small pull tab to the bottom of the sack. A half inch tab of grosgrain sewn into the bottom hem would even suffice.
      >
      > I'd like to thank Sea to Summit and BackpackGearTest for the opportunity to test the amazing Ultra-Sil View Dry Sacks.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      > Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.
      >




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