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FR - Columbia Omni Freeze - Justin Potts

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  • Justin Potts
    Gail, Below is my HTML and text for my field report. I look forward to your edits. Thanks Justin Potts -Pottsy HTML: http://tinyurl.com/97mo59d Text:
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 3, 2012
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      Gail,

      Below is my HTML and text for my field report. I look forward to your edits.

      Thanks
      Justin Potts

      -Pottsy



      HTML:

      http://tinyurl.com/97mo59d


      Text:
      <a name="FRPT">FIELD REPORT</a>
       
      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
       
      My first trip was a two-night hiking/climbing trip to the Wichita Wildlife Refuge. The distance traveled per day was undetermined.

      My second outing was a three-night backpacking trip in the Wichita Wildlife Refuge in late spring. Covering 15-20 mi (24-32 km) per day. It was fairly warm, so packs were light. The terrain was relatively flat in the backpacking area compared to other parts of the Wildlife Refuge.

      And finally, a five-day, four-night trip in the Sangre De Cristo Mountains in late summer. Elevation ~13,000 ft (4,000 m) with somewhere around 5,300 ft (1,600 m) gain from the base. Covering somewhere between 10-12 mi (16-19 km) a day. Here it also rained every day at 4-6 PM like clockwork.

      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1"  IMAGE CAPTION = "Drying out after a storm.">>
       
      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
       
      Even though this shirt is classified as a base layer, I primarily wore it alone, except while in Colorado because I had a fleece or a rain jacket over the top of it. That being said, it performed wonderfully at keeping me cool and dry in the heat.
      -
      Materials and Moisture Management:

      As mentioned previously in the Initial report, the shirt is a combination of polyester and elastane. After wearing it for awhile I do not even notice that I am even wearing a shirt at all. The combination of materials provide a soft to the touch, very comfortable shirt. The elastane also gives it enough stretch so that it does not restrict movement at all. And since the Omnifreeze is a snug athletic fit it just became a part of my body.

      While being thin and soft, the shirt proved to be tough. There is no noticeable wear showing from wear my pack rides, and only one small mark from some thick brush I was tromping through in Colorado.

      Before talking about moisture management, let it be known that I sweat... A lot! So, I had some reservations before wearing this shirt this summer as to whether or not it could keep me dry. However, it did remarkably well. No, it did not keep me completely dry in the 105+ F (40+ C) temperatures, but it did manage it well. The Omnifreeze does this by wicking moisture away from the skin to the outside of the shirt so that it can evaporate quicker.

      Construction:

      I mentioned in the Initial Report that I had concerns about the extra seams around the mesh panels. I had thought having seams in weird places might irritate the skin a bit, but it was not noticeable. On the down side, across the top of the shirt from shoulder to shoulder is a mesh panel. I did find out that this fabric is NOT sun protective. After caring for a pretty bad sun burn on my shoulders I made sure to put sun screen on my shoulders before wearing this shirt.

       
      SUMMARY
       
      In summary, the Columbia Omnifreeze has performed very well. It keeps me cooler and relatively drier than other base layers that I have used. There is no noticeable stretching which I have experienced with other similar tops. And the only fault I have found is that it is not completely sun protective.


      Finally I would like to thank Columbia Sportswear and BackpackGearTest.org for this opportunity.

      This concludes my Field Report, tune in during November for my Long Term Report after getting it out for more trail time!
       
       
       
      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2012.  All rights reserved.


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    • woodswoman
      Justin, Nice job..looks like you had fun trips! I have a few edits and then you are good to upload:    ________________________________ -Covering 15-20 mi
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 3, 2012
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        Justin,
        Nice job..looks like you had fun trips!

        I have a few edits and then you are good to upload:


          


        ________________________________
        -Covering 15-20 mi (24-32 km) per day.


        EDIT: "The trip covered" 15-20.......

        -  Covering somewhere between 10-12 mi (16-19 km) a day.  
        EDIT: Please make this a sentence by adding a subject such as "The trip covered......"

         
         
         
         - There is no noticeable wear showing from wear my pack rides, and only one small mark from some thick brush I was tromping through in Colorado.
        EDIT: spelling/ from "where" my pack rides

         

         -After caring for a pretty bad sun burn on my shoulders I made sure to put sun screen on my shoulders before wearing this shirt.
        EDIT: Usually sunburn and sunscreen are "one" words

         
        -Comment: I would remove thanking the manufacturer from the Initial Report as you now have it in the Field Report (the same will apply when you do the Long Term Report).

        That's it!! (Too bad about the sunburn though-ouch! ..at least you now know its limitations).  Gail 
         
         
         
         




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