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FR - Solo Stove - Katie Montovan

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  • sull0294
    Hi Mike, I hope that you had a nice trip. I have uploaded my Field Report for the Solo Stove to the test folder and look forward to your edits. It has been a
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 20, 2012
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      Hi Mike,

      I hope that you had a nice trip. I have uploaded my Field Report for the Solo Stove to the test folder and look forward to your edits. It has been a fun test so far!

      http://tinyurl.com/bw6yj4x

      Best,
      Katie Montovan




      * Solo Stove

      *FIELD REPORT *

      * FIELD CONDITIONS *

      Trip 1: Teaching a 2-night backcountry cooking course backpacking on the
      Finger Lakes Trail near Ithaca, NY. The weather went from sunny and 90 F
      (32 C) the first day to heavy rain and 35 F (2 C) the second night.

      Trip 2: 5-night canoe camping trip in the boundary waters near Ely, MN.
      Temperatures ranged from 70 F (21 C) to 95F (35C) and weather covered
      most options including high wind, beautiful sunny days, drizzly rain,
      and sudden downpours. We cooked a wide range of foods- including bacon
      and eggs, pizza, couscous pilaf, and thanksgiving in a pot.

      Trip 3: 2-night car camping trip to Stillwater Resevoir, near Lowville,
      NY. Weather was sunny and 75 - 85 F (24 - 29 C). We cooked fancier
      car-camping foods that we normally don't get to eat when camping.

      Trip 3: Solo 2-night backpacking trip along the Finger Lakes Trail, near
      Ithaca, NY. It was sunny and humid for the whole trip and temperatures
      ranged from 57 - 88 F (14 - 31 C). Elevation ranged from 400 - 1700 ft
      (120 - 520 m). I mostly rehydrated meals and boiled water on this trip.

      * FIELD REPORT *

      This stove arrived just in time for a back country cooking class I was
      teaching. The main stoves used on this course are pressurized white gas
      backpacking stoves, but I brought the Solo Stove and my homemade alcohol
      stove along so that my students could try a few different kinds of
      stoves. On our first morning out, one of the pressurized white gas
      stoves failed, starting a small leaf fire and burning one of the
      students. That event changed the tone for the whole trip. The students
      because very interested in learning how to cook over an open fire and
      using the Solo Stove because the dangers were more predicable.
      IMAGE 1
      *Fruit crisp cooked over
      the Solo Stove
      *


      I taught a student how to use an alcohol stove by placing the alcohol
      stove inside of the Solo Stove. The Solo Stove worked well as a pot
      stand and windscreen for the alcohol stove. I was impressed by how the
      Solo Stove seemed to make the flames larger and increase the heat output
      (while also increasing fuel consumption). We used it to cook the
      mushrooms for our pizza and were very happy with the results. Then we
      fired up the Solo Stove with twigs to rehydrate and heat the pizza
      sauce. It was drizzling rain and it was still easy to start the fire.
      One of us paid attention to the pizza sauce while the other fed the fire.

      Next, we combined the pizza sauce with a dough we had made and attempted
      to cook pizzas over the Solo Stove. We put the pizza in a pan designed
      for backcountry baking, put it over the stove, and rotated the pan while
      the pizza cooked. We also built a fire on top of the lid to bake the
      pizza from above as a way to practice some fancy backcountry baking
      skills. The pizza turned out beautifully! Crispy on the bottom, cooked
      all the way through, and not burnt at all. We found that we really
      needed two people for this adventure (one to feed the fire while the
      other paid attention to the food). With so much going on it was easy to
      forget to feed the fire and let the stove go out.
      IMAGE 1
      *Cinnamon Rolls baked over the Solo Stove
      *


      Rain: We cooked a second pizza over the stove but by this time it was
      pouring rain and getting the stove lit was much trickier. If the pan
      wasn't over the stove, the rain would put the fire out. We used an
      aluminum wind screen to shield the stove from the rain. It was also
      challenging to keep the twig pile for feeding the fire dry. Feeding the
      well established fire wet twigs worked, but appeared to decrease the
      heat output and lengthened cooking times.

      Stability: When this stove is placed onto a nice flat surface it is
      pretty stable. But when I have used it to cook on a bumpy rock or
      slightly uneven ground, I have had a problems with it tipping over.
      Because the base is a solid, flat circle, any rocks or bumps within the
      circle make the stove tippy. It is a manageable problem when the pot
      over the stove is fairly narrow, but when using a wide frying pan I had
      to be very careful to not tip everything over. On a couple of occasions
      I was not careful enough and ended up with food and fuel spilling all
      over the ground. As a result, I am always careful to keep the potgrips
      next to the stove so that they are ready at a moments notice and to
      always use them when doing anything with the pot that is on the stove.

      Solo Cooking: This stove was tricky to use on my own because I had to
      continuously watch the fire while also prepping and dealing with the
      food being cooked. I found that I could boil water or cook pasta on my
      own, but if I attempted anything more complicated on my own, the fire
      went out while I was dealing with the food and I had to restart the fire
      before I could finish cooking. I carry my alcohol stove in the Solo
      Stove and have found that it is a really nice option for times when I
      want to cook more involved dishes, but don't have someone available to
      help me with the fire.

      *SUMMARY *

      This is a solid and well-made wood stove that works very well. I have
      been impressed with the design and construction of this stove and only
      have concerns about its stability. I have discovered through testing
      this stove that using a wood stove is very different from other types of
      stoves and comes with it's own set of drawbacks (sooty pots, smoky
      smelling clothing, continual need to be fed). I love the versatility of
      this stove but am not always up to using wood as a fuel. The Solo Stove
      combined with an alcohol stove works great for me. When I am sleepy in
      the morning and don't want to mess with starting a fire I can use the
      alcohol stove, but when there are a couple of us cooking dinner and we
      don't mind hanging out and feeding the fire, then the wood stove works
      great.

      *LIKES *

      * It won't explode
      * Solid construction doesn't deform in my pack
      * Works great as a windscreen and potstand for my homemade alcohol stove

      *DISLIKES *

      * It is tippy with a large pan on top
      * General woodstove drawbacks:
      o It is hard to start and keep the fire going during a downpour
      o It is a lot less efficient when the wood is wet
      o Sooty stove and pot
      o Smokey smelling clothing and gear
      o Difficult to cook complicated dishes alone


      Thank you to Solo Stove and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to
      test the Solo Stove. Please check back in late October to see how the
      Solo Stove has worked for me on more culinary adventures in the woods.
    • the_fish_guy
      Katie, Outstanding report! Among the most enjoyable I ve ever read! Had a great trip . . . thanks for asking! Fruit crisp, pizza, and cinnamon rolls? I ve
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 31, 2012
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        Katie,

        Outstanding report! Among the most enjoyable I've ever read!

        Had a great trip . . . thanks for asking! Fruit crisp, pizza, and cinnamon rolls? I've actually lived off ramen and jerky for a week-long trip. You can backpack with me ANY TIME! In fact, will you marry me?

        Oh, wait, I'm already married.

        Great report! Below are your edits, usual format.

        Look forward to your LTR!

        Mike

        <SNIP>

        The students
        because very interested in learning how to cook over an open fire and
        using the Solo Stove because the dangers were more predicable.

        EDIT: Spelling – predictable.

        <SNIP>

        Stability: When this stove is placed onto a nice flat surface it is
        pretty stable. But when I have used it to cook on a bumpy rock or
        slightly uneven ground, I have had a problems with it tipping over.

        EDIT: delete the extra "a" before "problems"

        <SNIP>

        As a result, I am always careful to keep the potgrips
        next to the stove so that they are ready at a moments notice and to
        always use them when doing anything with the pot that is on the stove.

        EDIT: moment's (possessive form)

        <SNIP>

        I have discovered through testing
        this stove that using a wood stove is very different from other types of
        stoves and comes with it's own set of drawbacks (sooty pots, smoky
        smelling clothing, continual need to be fed).

        EDIT: its, not it's (the apostrophe is not used in the possessive form, only for the contraction of "it is.")

        <END>


        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "sull0294" <sull0294@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Mike,
        >
        > I hope that you had a nice trip. I have uploaded my Field Report for the Solo Stove to the test folder and look forward to your edits. It has been a fun test so far!
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/bw6yj4x
        >
        > Best,
        > Katie Montovan
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > * Solo Stove
        >
        > *FIELD REPORT *
        >
        > * FIELD CONDITIONS *
        >
        > Trip 1: Teaching a 2-night backcountry cooking course backpacking on the
        > Finger Lakes Trail near Ithaca, NY. The weather went from sunny and 90 F
        > (32 C) the first day to heavy rain and 35 F (2 C) the second night.
        >
        > Trip 2: 5-night canoe camping trip in the boundary waters near Ely, MN.
        > Temperatures ranged from 70 F (21 C) to 95F (35C) and weather covered
        > most options including high wind, beautiful sunny days, drizzly rain,
        > and sudden downpours. We cooked a wide range of foods- including bacon
        > and eggs, pizza, couscous pilaf, and thanksgiving in a pot.
        >
        > Trip 3: 2-night car camping trip to Stillwater Resevoir, near Lowville,
        > NY. Weather was sunny and 75 - 85 F (24 - 29 C). We cooked fancier
        > car-camping foods that we normally don't get to eat when camping.
        >
        > Trip 3: Solo 2-night backpacking trip along the Finger Lakes Trail, near
        > Ithaca, NY. It was sunny and humid for the whole trip and temperatures
        > ranged from 57 - 88 F (14 - 31 C). Elevation ranged from 400 - 1700 ft
        > (120 - 520 m). I mostly rehydrated meals and boiled water on this trip.
        >
        > * FIELD REPORT *
        >
        > This stove arrived just in time for a back country cooking class I was
        > teaching. The main stoves used on this course are pressurized white gas
        > backpacking stoves, but I brought the Solo Stove and my homemade alcohol
        > stove along so that my students could try a few different kinds of
        > stoves. On our first morning out, one of the pressurized white gas
        > stoves failed, starting a small leaf fire and burning one of the
        > students. That event changed the tone for the whole trip. The students
        > because very interested in learning how to cook over an open fire and
        > using the Solo Stove because the dangers were more predicable.
        > IMAGE 1
        > *Fruit crisp cooked over
        > the Solo Stove
        > *
        >
        >
        > I taught a student how to use an alcohol stove by placing the alcohol
        > stove inside of the Solo Stove. The Solo Stove worked well as a pot
        > stand and windscreen for the alcohol stove. I was impressed by how the
        > Solo Stove seemed to make the flames larger and increase the heat output
        > (while also increasing fuel consumption). We used it to cook the
        > mushrooms for our pizza and were very happy with the results. Then we
        > fired up the Solo Stove with twigs to rehydrate and heat the pizza
        > sauce. It was drizzling rain and it was still easy to start the fire.
        > One of us paid attention to the pizza sauce while the other fed the fire.
        >
        > Next, we combined the pizza sauce with a dough we had made and attempted
        > to cook pizzas over the Solo Stove. We put the pizza in a pan designed
        > for backcountry baking, put it over the stove, and rotated the pan while
        > the pizza cooked. We also built a fire on top of the lid to bake the
        > pizza from above as a way to practice some fancy backcountry baking
        > skills. The pizza turned out beautifully! Crispy on the bottom, cooked
        > all the way through, and not burnt at all. We found that we really
        > needed two people for this adventure (one to feed the fire while the
        > other paid attention to the food). With so much going on it was easy to
        > forget to feed the fire and let the stove go out.
        > IMAGE 1
        > *Cinnamon Rolls baked over the Solo Stove
        > *
        >
        >
        > Rain: We cooked a second pizza over the stove but by this time it was
        > pouring rain and getting the stove lit was much trickier. If the pan
        > wasn't over the stove, the rain would put the fire out. We used an
        > aluminum wind screen to shield the stove from the rain. It was also
        > challenging to keep the twig pile for feeding the fire dry. Feeding the
        > well established fire wet twigs worked, but appeared to decrease the
        > heat output and lengthened cooking times.
        >
        > Stability: When this stove is placed onto a nice flat surface it is
        > pretty stable. But when I have used it to cook on a bumpy rock or
        > slightly uneven ground, I have had a problems with it tipping over.
        > Because the base is a solid, flat circle, any rocks or bumps within the
        > circle make the stove tippy. It is a manageable problem when the pot
        > over the stove is fairly narrow, but when using a wide frying pan I had
        > to be very careful to not tip everything over. On a couple of occasions
        > I was not careful enough and ended up with food and fuel spilling all
        > over the ground. As a result, I am always careful to keep the potgrips
        > next to the stove so that they are ready at a moments notice and to
        > always use them when doing anything with the pot that is on the stove.
        >
        > Solo Cooking: This stove was tricky to use on my own because I had to
        > continuously watch the fire while also prepping and dealing with the
        > food being cooked. I found that I could boil water or cook pasta on my
        > own, but if I attempted anything more complicated on my own, the fire
        > went out while I was dealing with the food and I had to restart the fire
        > before I could finish cooking. I carry my alcohol stove in the Solo
        > Stove and have found that it is a really nice option for times when I
        > want to cook more involved dishes, but don't have someone available to
        > help me with the fire.
        >
        > *SUMMARY *
        >
        > This is a solid and well-made wood stove that works very well. I have
        > been impressed with the design and construction of this stove and only
        > have concerns about its stability. I have discovered through testing
        > this stove that using a wood stove is very different from other types of
        > stoves and comes with it's own set of drawbacks (sooty pots, smoky
        > smelling clothing, continual need to be fed). I love the versatility of
        > this stove but am not always up to using wood as a fuel. The Solo Stove
        > combined with an alcohol stove works great for me. When I am sleepy in
        > the morning and don't want to mess with starting a fire I can use the
        > alcohol stove, but when there are a couple of us cooking dinner and we
        > don't mind hanging out and feeding the fire, then the wood stove works
        > great.
        >
        > *LIKES *
        >
        > * It won't explode
        > * Solid construction doesn't deform in my pack
        > * Works great as a windscreen and potstand for my homemade alcohol stove
        >
        > *DISLIKES *
        >
        > * It is tippy with a large pan on top
        > * General woodstove drawbacks:
        > o It is hard to start and keep the fire going during a downpour
        > o It is a lot less efficient when the wood is wet
        > o Sooty stove and pot
        > o Smokey smelling clothing and gear
        > o Difficult to cook complicated dishes alone
        >
        >
        > Thank you to Solo Stove and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to
        > test the Solo Stove. Please check back in late October to see how the
        > Solo Stove has worked for me on more culinary adventures in the woods.
        >
      • sull0294
        Mike, Thank you for your edits! I am glad that you had a nice trip and that you enjoyed my report. I use camping as a chance to challenge myself to make
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 1, 2012
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          Mike,

          Thank you for your edits! I am glad that you had a nice trip and that you enjoyed my report. I use camping as a chance to challenge myself to make delicious meals using limited resources, and have recently learned backcountry baking and love to show off.

          I have made all of the changes that you suggested but am unable to delete my initial report (so I can not upload the Field Report). I am not sure it you can fix this or if it is something that Kathy will need to do.

          As soon as I am able, I will upload the revised report and delete the test file.

          -Katie
        • Kathy Waters
          Deleted the IR - you can upload now. Kathy ... From: sull0294 To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2012 10:13 AM Subject:
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 1, 2012
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            Deleted the IR - you can upload now.

            Kathy

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: sull0294
            To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2012 10:13 AM
            Subject: [backpackgeartesters] COMMENT: EDIT: FR - Solo Stove - Katie Montovan



            Mike,

            Thank you for your edits! I am glad that you had a nice trip and that you enjoyed my report. I use camping as a chance to challenge myself to make delicious meals using limited resources, and have recently learned backcountry baking and love to show off.

            I have made all of the changes that you suggested but am unable to delete my initial report (so I can not upload the Field Report). I am not sure it you can fix this or if it is something that Kathy will need to do.

            As soon as I am able, I will upload the revised report and delete the test file.

            -Katie





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