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FR: Big Agnes Passport poles- Nancy Griffith

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  • Nancy Griffith
    Hi Lori,   I ve posted my pole FR to the test folder.  Here is the text and link.   Thanks for reviewing it and providing edits.   You ll see that we were
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 3, 2012
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      Hi Lori,
       
      I've posted my pole FR to the test folder.  Here is the text and link.
       
      Thanks for reviewing it and providing edits.
       
      You'll see that we were in Pinnacles this spring too but apparently a different weekend than you.  I think I recall that you were there in late-April during that killer heat.  I hope it was still fun!  We were lucky to be in Sequoia that weekend and the snow was melting like crazy.
       
      Have a great summer,
       
      Nancy
       
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR-%20Big%20Agnes%20Passport%20poles-%20Nancy%20Griffith/#FRPT
       
      http://tinyurl.com/87u45wo
       
       
      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
       
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Sequoia">>During the Field Testing period I used the Big Agnes Passport Helinox poles for three multi-day trips and three day hikes for a total of ten days of testing.  I used them for snowshoeing, hiking and backpacking for a total of 64 mi (103 km) on granite, dirt, mud, snow and ice.
      Overnight Trips:
      Pinnacles National Monument, California: 2 days of hiking with fully loaded backpack; 10.9 mi (17.5 km); 1,260 to 2,100 ft (384 to 640 m) elevation; 28 to 70 F (-2 to 21 C).
      Sequoia National Park, California: 1 day of hiking 3.6 mi (5.8 km) and 1 day of snowshoeing 5 mi (8 km) with partly loaded backpack; 6,200 to 6,700 ft (1,890 to 2,042 m) elevation; 55 to 65 F (13 to 18 C).
      Hunters Trail, Sierra Nevada (California): 3 days of backpacking with fully loaded backpack; 20 mi (32 km); 3,500 to 5,000 ft (1,067 to 1,524 m); 35 to 65 F (2 to 18 C) .
      Day Trips:
      South Fork American River Trail, California: 10.9 mi; 800 to 1,200 ft (240 to 370 m) elevation; 60 to 75 F (15 to 24 C).
      Auburn Recreation Area, California; 3.6 mi (6 km); 500 to 1,500 ft (150 to 450 m) elevation; 35 to 55 F (2 to 13 C).
      Forni Lake, Desolation Wilderness, California: 10 mi (16.1 km); 6,600 to 7,100 ft (2,012 to 2,164 m) elevation; 55 to 70 F (13 to 21 C).
       
      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
       
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "on pack">>The Big Agnes Passport trekking poles have performed flawlessly over the test period.  I have to admit that due to their light weight I wasn't expecting them to be so durable.  I have managed to bend even the heftiest downhill ski poles so I am impressed with these poles.  There have been multiple occasions where my entire body weight including a full backpack has been supported by one pole which has jammed between rocks.  There are no signs of any bending or damage to the poles.  Overall the durability has been impeccable.  There are some very slight scratches but surprisingly few considering how much abuse the lower sections of the poles have been subject to.
      The ability for these poles to collapse and fold to such a small length and compact size is truly ingenious.  In fact they are so short when folded that they are too short to attach to my backpack in the area designated for poles!  The photo shows the grip held at the very top and the tip of pole still doesn't reach.  The other side shows a standard trekking pole which is held well below the grip with the tip in the loop.
      I like to be able to stow my poles when scrambling and was easily able to do this with these poles.  On the Pinnacles hike there is a long section through a cave system which I could not use poles inside due to the need for crawling and scrambling.  I stowed the poles on my pack easily and quickly.  Then on the other side it is very easy to restore them to full length and get moving.  I also stowed them when fishing at Forni Lake and for scrambling over rocks on the hike back.
      The push button works easily to release the upper section and then I can fold the lower sections and simply tie the sections together with the hook-and-loop strap.  It is fairly easy to do all of this while continuing to hike.
      Despite the very small basket I used the poles on one snowshoe hike.  The snow was late-season and thus very compact and icy so the poles did fine in most areas.  I haven't yet used the rubber tips but I plan to use them during the Long-term test period now that the higher elevations of exposed granite are not covered with snow.
      The straps are easy to adjust and very comfortable even when soaking wet.  I hiked for many hours in pouring rain on the Hunters Trail trip and didn't feel any discomfort with the straps.  They also dried quickly the next day when the rain stopped.
      The handles are comfortable even while holding the top for steep downhill sections.  I like having the additional cushioning well below the grip area because I like to grip my poles low on steep climbs.
       
      SUMMARY
       
      The Big Agnes Passport Helinox trekking poles are a very light weight yet extremely durable set of hiking poles.
      Upsides:
      Light weight
      Collapse/fold to a compact size
      Comfortable
      Downsides (well, not really):
      So compact that they don't fit on my backpack pole storage area
      This concludes my Field Report.  Check back in two months for my Long-term Report.  Thanks to Big Agnes and BackpackGearTest.org for allowing me to participate in this test.
       
       
       
      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2012.  All rights reserved.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lori
      Hi Nancy, We really lucked out! the weekend we were at Pinnacles the weather was nice and cool. Hitting the High peaks and Chalone peak was pretty nice. It
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 7, 2012
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        Hi Nancy,

        We really lucked out! the weekend we were at Pinnacles the weather
        was nice and cool. Hitting the High peaks and Chalone peak was pretty
        nice.

        It looks like these poles are a hit - I have to say I was intrigued.
        I find myself wondering if they are of adequate length for using them
        with a shelter?

        Just a couple of minor things...

        >
        > The ability for these poles to collapse and fold to such a small
        > length and compact size is truly ingenious.

        EDIT: It would be better "ability of these poles"

        > I stowed the poles on my pack easily and quickly. Then on the
        > other side it is very easy to restore them to full length and get

        Edit: It would be clearer if you specified the other side of the
        cave, or "Then after exiting the caves" - it is not immediately clear.

        I'm seeing folks put a second summary, likes and dislikes on the
        field report and leaving the original on the initial - it must be a
        matter of style, I have been updating and bumping those to the end of
        combined test reports.

        I believe you are quite familiar with the edit/upload/delete cycle by
        now... :)
      • Nancy Griffith
        Thanks Lori. I have made the changes and uploaded. I will try out tent options with the poles in my LTR. Thanks for the reminder! Nancy Sent from my iPhone ...
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 9, 2012
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          Thanks Lori. I have made the changes and uploaded. I will try out tent options with the poles in my LTR. Thanks for the reminder!

          Nancy

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Jun 7, 2012, at 8:37 PM, Lori <lori.pontious@...> wrote:

          > Hi Nancy,
          >
          > We really lucked out! the weekend we were at Pinnacles the weather
          > was nice and cool. Hitting the High peaks and Chalone peak was pretty
          > nice.
          >
          > It looks like these poles are a hit - I have to say I was intrigued.
          > I find myself wondering if they are of adequate length for using them
          > with a shelter?
          >
          > Just a couple of minor things...
          >
          > >
          > > The ability for these poles to collapse and fold to such a small
          > > length and compact size is truly ingenious.
          >
          > EDIT: It would be better "ability of these poles"
          >
          > > I stowed the poles on my pack easily and quickly. Then on the
          > > other side it is very easy to restore them to full length and get
          >
          > Edit: It would be clearer if you specified the other side of the
          > cave, or "Then after exiting the caves" - it is not immediately clear.
          >
          > I'm seeing folks put a second summary, likes and dislikes on the
          > field report and leaving the original on the initial - it must be a
          > matter of style, I have been updating and bumping those to the end of
          > combined test reports.
          >
          > I believe you are quite familiar with the edit/upload/delete cycle by
          > now... :)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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