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EDIT: Revised IR - Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T. Multitool - Mark Thompson

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  • ftroop94
    Mark, Great job on the re-write. I think readers will certainly gain something from your report! There are a few edits to review, mostly minor, then feel free
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 4, 2011
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      Mark,

      Great job on the re-write. I think readers will certainly gain something from your report!

      There are a few edits to review, mostly minor, then feel free to delete the test file and upload to the site. I look forward to seeing how is compares to your former technology in a few months.

      Steve

      Here's the file link if it helps!

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Knives/Multi-tools/Gerber%20Crucial%20F.A.S.T.%20Red%20Pocket%20Tool/



      >> The Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T. Multitool arrived in a rather plain package without any of the "normal" paperwork.

      EDIT: Multi-tool

      >> The tool is a bit on the hefty side (a full ounce heavier than my 40 year old Swiss army knife) but has a nice feel and pliers!

      EDIT: We need to add the metric conversions, so I suggest changing to commas so the sentence isn't overwhelmed with parentheses…The tool is a bit on the hefty side, a full ounce (28 g) heavier than my 40 year old Swiss army knife, but has a nice feel and pliers!

      >> It turns out that it is the on/off variety and I just needed to push it all the way off.

      Edit: I had to re-read this twice to get the point. I'd suggest: ….and I just need to push the mechanism all the way to the off position.

      >> With any type of spring loaded devise, it is wise to have a safety lever or catch to prevent accidental activation.

      EDIT: device

      >> In this case, accidentally activating the spring loaded blade (assuming a safety devise was not present) could result in the blade being exposed unintentionally.

      EDIT: device

      >> I hope to become more adept at using the F.A.ST. and actually get the blade out safely with one hand.

      EDIT: F.A.S.T.


      >> A special thanks to Gerber and BackpackGearTest.org for allowing me the opportunity to test this tool.

      EDIT: It is customary to Remind the reader to check back in approximately two months for a Field Report.


      --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Mark Thompson <markthompson242@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Steve,
      > Thanks for your edits.  The text version is below and I have uploaded the revised IR to the test section  http://tinyurl.com/IR-Gerber-FAST-MET.
      >
      > Best,
      > Mark
      >  
      >
      > GERBER CRUCIAL F.A.S.T.
      > TEST SERIES BY MARK THOMPSON
      > IR
      > September 30, 2011
      >  
      > TESTER INFORMATION
      >  
      > NAME: Mark Thompson
      > EMAIL: markthompson 242 at gmail dot com
      > AGE: 47
      > LOCATION: Parker, CO
      > GENDER: M
      > HEIGHT: 6' 0" (2.10 m)
      > WEIGHT: 190 lb (86.20 kg)
      >  
      > Outdoor adventures started for me at an early age, my passions have grown to include backpacking, rock climbing, hiking, hunting, fishing, canoeing, cycling, skiing and snowshoeing.  Most of my adventures presently take place in Colorado's amazing Rocky Mountains.  For trail hikes, my pack typically weighs 15 lbs/6.8 kg (summer/fall), 25 lbs/11.3 kg (winter/spring) and trail speed usually ranges from 2.5 - 3.8 mph (4.0 - 6.1 kph) depending on elevation gain.  For multi-night backpack trips, my pack weighs 40 - 45 lbs (18 - 20 kg) and my trail speed drops to 1.5 - 3.0 mph (2.4 - 4.8 kph).
      >  
      >  
      > INITIAL REPORT
      >     
      > PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS
      >  
      > Manufacturer: Gerber
      > Year of Manufacture: 2011
      > Manufacturer's Website: <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.gerbergear.com">>
      > MSRP: US$58.00
      > Listed Weight: 5.8 oz (164 g)
      > Measured Weight: 5.8 oz (164 g)
      > Other details:
      > From the manufacturer's website, this is a multi-component tool with "Forward Assisted Spring Technology" (F.A.S.T.).
      > Components of the tool include:
      > - Half Fine/Half Serrated Blade
      > - Long Medium Flat Head Driver
      > - Long Square Cross Driver
      > - Bottle Opener
      > - Needle-nose Pliers
      > - Regular Pliers
      > - Pinch Style Wire Cutters
      > <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2">>
      > Photo courtesy of Gerber.
      >  
      > INITIAL IMPRESSIONS
      >  
      > The Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T.  Multitool arrived in a rather plain package without any of the "normal" paperwork.  The warranty was printed on the outside of the box, but there were no operating or maintenance instructions (I guess they figure that everyone knows how to use one or that nobody reads the product literature).
      > The manufacturer lists the pliers as three separate tools; however, I would attest that they are one tool with three different sections and specific uses.  Although not clear to me as to how many components are being claimed, the site does list the two different sections of the blade (fine and serrated).  Without splitting hairs, I see four distinct tools:
      >      - One knife blade (with fine and serrated sections)
      >      - Two screw drivers
      >      - One bottle opener
      >      - One pair of pliers (with 3 sections)
      > Most of the pliers I have run across have more than one section:
      >      - Standard pliers have a flat section on the tip (for grasping flat objects) and a rounded section in the middle (for items having a circular type shape, i.e. bolts, etc.) and some have a scissor style cutting section at the base (although I have never had any luck getting a decent cut from these)
      >      -  Needle-nose pliers have a small flat section on the tip and pinch style wire cutters at the base
      > The Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T. pliers incorporate:
      >           - Needle-nose pliers on the tip
      >           - A round section in the middle similar to those found on standard pliers
      >           - Pinch style wire cutters at the base
      > Although not listed as a component, the tool does have a side mounted belt clip.
      > <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1">>
      > The tool is a bit on the hefty side (a full ounce heavier than my 40 year old Swiss army knife) but has a nice feel and pliers!
      >  
      >
      >  
      > TRYING IT OUT
      >  
      > Being male, the first thing I had to do was to check out the blade.  The safety device didn't operate smoothly and gave me some initial challenges as I wasn't sure if it was the spring loaded type or the on/off variety.  It turns out that it is the on/off variety and I just needed to push it all the way off.   After a few uses, the safety seems to be operating properly. The next challenge was to get my thumb to activate the "Forward Assist Spring Technology" on the knife blade.  F.A.S.T. represents a design which utilizes a spring to assist in the opening of the knife.  With any type of spring loaded devise, it is wise to have a safety lever or catch to prevent accidental activation.  In this case, accidentally activating the spring loaded blade (assuming a safety devise was not present) could result in the blade being exposed unintentionally.  I wasn't too successful in activating F.A.S.T. and ended up testing the edge on the blade with my
      > thumb.  Consistent with every other Gerber knife I have owned, the blade is razor sharp!
      > A firm grip was required to open the tool to expose the pliers.  The action was smooth yet stiff, which I prefer as I sincerely do not like sloppy tools.  Considering the rather small size of the tool and what I would consider an average size adult male hand, it fit me well and comfortably.  The edges of the frame and non-exposed tools were manufactured such that I didn't experience the cutting or pinching I have with other multi-tools.
      > Gaining access to the screw drivers and bottle opener was rather uneventful and both implements have their own locking device which ensures they stay in the fully extended position during use.  The locking mechanism was easy to release, enabling a quick and easy closure.
      >  
      >  
      > SUMMARY
      >  
      > My hope is that I will be able to replace my aging Swiss army knife (I bought it in Zermatt, Switzerland nearly 40 years ago) with this Multitool.  It is not that I dislike my trusty knife, it is quite the opposite, reaching near heirloom status.  There are obvious differences between the old and the new, but times have changed and so have the requirements for a field tool.   The Swiss army knife has nearly twice the number of tools (even when using Gerber's count) but the Gerber seems to be much more robust and appears to be able to stand up to significantly more abuse.  The Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T. appears to be a well built tool that has a nice feel.  I hope to become more adept at using the F.A.ST. and actually get the blade out safely with one hand.
      > A special thanks to Gerber and BackpackGearTest.org for allowing me the opportunity to test this tool.
      >  
      >  
      >  
      > This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      > Copyright 2011.  All rights reserved.
      >  
      >  
      > ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      > From: Mark Thompson <markthompson242@...>
      > Date: Mon, Oct 3, 2011 at 6:48 PM
      > Subject: Fw: [backpackgeartesters] EDIT: IR - Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T. Multitool - Mark Thompson
      > To: markthompson242@...
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- On Mon, 10/3/11, ftroop94 <ftroop94@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: ftroop94 <ftroop94@...>
      > Subject: [backpackgeartesters] EDIT: IR - Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T. Multitool - Mark Thompson
      > To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Monday, October 3, 2011, 3:01 AM
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Mark,
      >
      > Good start on the Gerber IR. Since there are a few key edits including changing some of the information around as listed below, I'd like you to post it back to this site and the Test File before we finalized the edits and upload it to the site.
      >
      > Thanks in advance,
      >
      > Steve
      >
      > >>Manufacturer's Website: http://www.gerbertools.com
      > EDIT: Gerber's website is actually as follows: www.gerbergear.com
      > The site you linked is an online merchant, whereas the latter is the actual manufacturer's link. The site also bullet points the all the components. I'd suggest adding them to the Products and Description section and citing the source.
      >
      > >>I haven't really figured out how many components the manufacturer is claiming, but here is what I found:
      > - One knife blade
      > - Two screw drivers
      > - One bottle opener
      > - One pair of pliers with 3 sections
      > - on the tip, a needle nose
      > - in the middle, standard pliers
      > - at the base, a cutting section
      > - A belt clip
      > EDIT: See above. It appears the knife and serrated blade are considered individual components per the Gerber site. If you want to note this `stretching it' or `splitting hairs' in your opinion feel free to do so, but based on the website info you need to correct the previous portion.
      >
      > I think you need add a little more information about the knife here in the INITIAL IMPPRESSIONS category. In the TRYING IT OUT section you mention the F.A.S.T. technology. It would be a good idea to go a little more into how what this is and how it works in your opinions. You also mention the safety lever in the ensuing section, but I'm a little confused about it. I would suggest expanding on this in the I.I. section. You mention it is heavy. How does it feel in the hand? Is it smooth, textured? Just a few ideas to share with the average reader that wants to learn about the knife and whether or not it may be a good fit for them!
      >
      > >>The tool is a bit on the hefty side (a full ounce heavier than my 40 year old swiss army knife) but has a nice feel and pliers!
      > EDIT: Swiss
      >
      > >>TESTING STRATEGY
      > My intention is to replace my aging Swiss Army Knife (I bought it in Zermatt, Switzerland nearly 40 years ago) so my testing strategy is to simply use this tool like I would my trusty knife. There are obvious differences between the old and the new, but times have changed and so have the requirements for a field tool.
      > EDIT: BGT no longer suggests using this in reports, as we go over it in the application. Feel free to put some of this information into the summary.
      >
      > --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Mark Thompson <markthompson242@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > > Please find my IR at:  http://tinyurl.com/IR-FAST-MET
      > >
      > > and below for your editing pleasure.
      > >  
      > > Best,
      > > Mark
      > >  
      > >
      > > GERBER CRUCIAL F.A.S.T.
      > > TEST SERIES BY MARK THOMPSON
      > > IR
      > > September 30, 2011
      > >  
      > > TESTER INFORMATION
      > >  
      > > NAME: Mark Thompson
      > > EMAIL: markthompson 242 at gmail dot com
      > > AGE: 47
      > > LOCATION: Parker, CO
      > > GENDER: M
      > > HEIGHT: 6' 0" (2.10 m)
      > > WEIGHT: 190 lb (86.20 kg)
      > > SHOE SIZE (US/EUR): Men's 11/45-46
      > >  
      > > Outdoor adventures started for me at an early age, my passions have grown to include backpacking, rock climbing, hiking, hunting, fishing, canoeing, cycling, skiing and snowshoeing.  Most of my adventures presently take place in Colorado's amazing Rocky Mountains.  For trail hikes, my pack typically weighs 15 lbs/6.8 kg (summer/fall), 25 lbs/11.3 kg (winter/spring) and trail speed usually ranges from 2.5 - 3.8 mph (4.0 - 6.1 kph) depending on elevation gain.  For multi-night backpack trips, my pack weighs 40 - 45 lbs (18 - 20 kg) and my trail speed drops to 1.5 - 3.0 mph (2.4 - 4.8 kph).
      > >  
      > >  
      > > INITIAL REPORT
      > >     
      > > PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS
      > >  
      > > Manufacturer: Gerber
      > > Year of Manufacture: 2011
      > > Manufacturer's Website: <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.gerbertools.com">>
      > > MSRP: US$75.00
      > > Listed Weight: 5.8 oz (164 g)
      > > Measured Weight: 5.8 oz (164 g)
      > > Other details: A multi-component tool with "Forward Assisted Spring Technology"
      > >  
      > > INITIAL IMPRESSIONS
      > >  
      > > The Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T.  Multitool arrived in a rather plain package without any of the "normal" paperwork.  The warranty was printed on the outside of the box, but there were no operating or maintenance instructions (I guess they figure that everyone knows how to use one or that nobody reads the product literature).
      > > <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1">>
      > > I haven't really figured out how many components the manufacturer is claiming, but here is what I found:
      > >      - One knife blade
      > >      - Two screw drivers
      > >      - One bottle opener
      > >      - One pair of pliers with 3 sections
      > >           - on the tip, a needle nose
      > >           - in the middle, standard pliers
      > >           - at the base, a cutting section
      > >      - A belt clip
      > > The tool is a bit on the hefty side (a full ounce heavier than my 40 year old swiss army knife) but has a nice feel and pliers!
      > >  
      > >
      > >  
      > > TRYING IT OUT
      > >  
      > > Being male, the first thing I had to do was to check out the blade.  The safety lever didn't operate smoothly and gave me some initial challenges as I wasn't sure if it was the spring loaded type or the on/off variety.  It turns out that it is the on/off variety and I just needed to push it all the way off.  The next challenge was to get my thumb to activate the "Forward Assist Spring Technology" on the knife blade.  I wasn't too successful and ended up testing the edge on the blade and, consistent with every other Gerber knife I have owned, the blade is razor sharp!  All the other components operated smoothly and presented a solid, confident feel!
      > >
      > >  
      > > TESTING STRATEGY
      > >  
      > > My intention is to replace my aging Swiss Army Knife (I bought it in Zermatt, Switzerland nearly 40 years ago) so my testing strategy is to simply use this tool like I would my trusty knife.  There are obvious differences between the old and the new, but times have changed and so have the requirements for a field tool.
      > >  
      > > SUMMARY
      > >  
      > > The Gerber Crucial F.A.S.T. appears to be a well built tool that has a nice feel.  I hope to become more adept at using the F.A.ST. and actually get the blade out safely with one hand.
      > > A special thanks to Gerber and BackpackGearTest.org for allowing me the opportunity to test this tool.
      > >  
      > >  
      > >  
      > > This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      > > Copyright 2011.  All rights reserved.
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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