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LTR - ECCO TAHOE TRAIL SHOES - STEVE KIDD

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  • ftroop94
    Ted, Following is my LTR for the Ecco s. I like them quite a bit. Let me know what to work on. Steve HTML: http://alturl.com/qgvr9 OR
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 2, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Ted,

      Following is my LTR for the Ecco's. I like them quite a bit. Let me know what to work on.

      Steve


      HTML:

      http://alturl.com/qgvr9

      OR

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/LTR%20-%20ECCO%20TAHOE%20-%20STEVE%20KIDD/


      TEXT:


      LONG-TERM REPORT

      LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      22 -25 August 2001: Charlotte, North Carolina. I took the shoes as my primary casual evening shoe on a 4-day and 3-night business trip, but they unexpectedly became the only footwear I could use on a last minute excursion to the U.S National Whitewater Center. I wore the shoes around town on the evening of the 22nd, rafting on the 23rd and not again for the remainder of the trip. Temperatures averaged in around 80 F (27 C) and research affirms local elevation is between 600 and 700 ft (183 - 213 m).

      1 - 5, September 2011: Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area, Tennessee/Kentucky. This was a 4-day and 3-night trip covering 16 mi (26 km) with approximate elevations of 350 - 450 ft (107 - 137 m) and temperatures ranging from 70 - 89 F (21 - 32 C). I backpacked and slept in a hammock. Conditions were dry and warm, but breaks in the humidity made backpacking much more pleasant for me than what I've hiked in the better part of this summer.


      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      I suggested I would put the ECCO's though a thorough water trial before this test series was over, and I surely did so! Initially, I must admit this isn't a suggested method to assess the typical way a pair of shoes repels water, but I can assure the reader I learned a bit about the Tahoe's on this adventure.

      As mentioned in my Field Report, I have used the shoes around town on occasion. I decided they would be excellent for casual/evening attire for a business trip I made to Charlotte, North Carolina. Little did I know that I would be coerced into a trip down the man-made US National Whitewater Center? Nor did I realize my water shoes, or even sneakers would be hundreds of miles (kilometers) away! A tee-shirt, pair of gym shorts and the ECCO's became my uniform for this unplanned jaunt!

      Omitting the bumps, bruises and other minor contusions I can attest the Tahoe's were soon soaked! In my opinion there is no way a sane human being can complain about a pair of shoes getting wet under these conditions, however, I will suggest that they remained so for longer than I expected. In fact they remained too soaked to wear for the remainder of the trip. Again, I must remind the reader this was for casual use and not on the trail where I would have worn wet shoes if it were a necessity. Yet, they were moist enough to concern me about a planned backcountry Labor Day adventure that was fast approaching.

      The shoes were still wet when I returned from Charlotte, and I set out to dry them safely as I would any leather item. Fortunately they were ready to go and as comfortable as the day I received them as I headed north toward the Kentucky state line.

      I covered 16 miles (26 km) in a handful of days surrounding the US Labor Day weekend. Temperatures were pleasant and dry for the entire trip. I often made my way to Lake Barkley or Kentucky Lake for refreshment during this adventure. Due to the circumstances the previous week I made sure to remove the Tahoe's and not get them severely wet while hydrating and cooling myself.

      On the trail the shoes were great! They never initiated a blister, hotspot or any discomfort. Elevation changes weren't at all drastic. I've mentioned the shoes are a little heavier than I expected and I still reaffirm this, however, I can assure the reader that I feel they wear very well...almost sneaker-like. I never realized I was trekking in a heavy shoe until I would remove it and hold it in my hand!

      The weight of the Tahoe may potentially deter some ultra-lightweight outdoorsman, but I can report that they are the closest thing to a bedroom slipper I've ever worn on the trail.


      SUMMARY

      The ECCO Tahoe Trail shoes have been an excellent asset on the unusually dry and arid trails of Tennessee and Kentucky this summer. They also held up admirably in non-standard conditions as primary foot protection.

      I find them excellent for both comfortable trail use and as casual footwear. The wide toe box and tapering heal is ideal for my foot.

      My only suggestion for improvement would be find some way to lighten them up and add water resistance for the enthusiastic outdoorsman. Once again, they feel lighter on my foot than they weigh in. I certainly see myself wearing these shoes during dry summers, and even in casual evenings around town.

      I'd like to thank BackpackGearTest and ECCO for the opportunity to test this product. This concludes my test report on the ECCO Tahoe Trail Shoes.




      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2011. All rights reserved.
    • Edward
      Thanks, Steve, please make the upload and delete from the test folder. Many thanks, Edward ... ### EDIT: ECCOs though a thorough water trial before this test
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 9, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks, Steve, please make the upload and delete from the test folder.

        Many thanks,

        Edward

        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "ftroop94" <ftroop94@...> wrote:
        >
        > Ted,
        >
        > Following is my LTR for the Ecco's. I like them quite a bit. Let me know what to work on.
        >
        > Steve
        >
        >

        >
        > PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
        >
        > I suggested I would put the ECCO's

        ### EDIT: ECCOs

        though a thorough water trial before this test series was over, and I surely did so! Initially, I must admit this isn't a suggested method to assess the typical way a pair of shoes repels water, but I can assure the reader I learned a bit about the Tahoe's on this adventure.
        >
        > As mentioned in my Field Report, I have used the shoes around town on occasion. I decided they would be excellent for casual/evening attire for a business trip I made to Charlotte, North Carolina. Little did I know that I would be coerced into a trip down the man-made US National Whitewater Center? Nor did I realize my water shoes, or even sneakers would be hundreds of miles (kilometers) away! A tee-shirt, pair of gym shorts and the ECCO's

        ### EDIT: ECCOs

        became my uniform for this unplanned jaunt!
        >
        > Omitting the bumps, bruises and other minor contusions I can attest the Tahoe's

        ### EDIT: Tahoes

        were soon soaked! In my opinion there is no way a sane human being can complain about a pair of shoes getting wet under these conditions, however, I will suggest that they remained so for longer than I expected. In fact they remained too soaked to wear for the remainder of the trip. Again, I must remind the reader this was for casual use and not on the trail where I would have worn wet shoes if it were a necessity. Yet, they were moist enough to concern me about a planned backcountry Labor Day adventure that was fast approaching.
        >
        > The shoes were still wet when I returned from Charlotte, and I set out to dry them safely as I would any leather item. Fortunately they were ready to go and as comfortable as the day I received them as I headed north toward the Kentucky state line.
        >
        > I covered 16 miles (26 km) in a handful of days surrounding the US Labor Day weekend. Temperatures were pleasant and dry for the entire trip. I often made my way to Lake Barkley or Kentucky Lake for refreshment during this adventure. Due to the circumstances the previous week I made sure to remove the Tahoe's

        ### EDIT: Tahoes


        and not get them severely wet while hydrating and cooling myself.
        >
        > On the trail the shoes were great! They never initiated a blister, hotspot or any discomfort. Elevation changes weren't at all drastic. I've mentioned the shoes are a little heavier than I expected and I still reaffirm this, however, I can assure the reader that I feel they wear very well...almost sneaker-like. I never realized I was trekking in a heavy shoe until I would remove it and hold it in my hand!
        >
        > The weight of the Tahoe may potentially deter some ultra-lightweight outdoorsman, but I can report that they are the closest thing to a bedroom slipper I've ever worn on the trail.
        >
        >
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