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LTR - ECCO Tahoe shoes - Kurt Papke

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  • Kurt Papke
    Ted: Here s my final report for your editing pleasure. Thanks in advance for your your work on this test. --Kurt
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 2, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Ted: Here's my final report for your editing pleasure. Thanks in
      advance for your your work on this test. --Kurt
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/ECCO%20Tahoe%20shoes%20-%20Kurt%20Papke/#Long-Term_Report
      or http://tinyurl.com/3btuyhc

      Long-Term Report
      Field Use
      Date
      Location
      Trail
      Distance
      Terrain/ trail type
      Weather
      Altitude range
      Insoles Used
      August 13
      Coronado National Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains just North of
      Tucson, Arizona Ventana Canyon Trail 7.6 miles
      (12.2 km) Mix of sand and granite boulders 82-88 F (28-31 C), winds
      were extremely calm, 40-74% RH 3000-4800 ft
      (915-1465 m) Orthotics
      August 14 Coronado National Forest, Santa Rita Mountains Southwest of
      Tucson, Arizona Arizona Trail, Kentucky Camp trailhead 7.2 miles
      (11.6 km) Dirt, gravel and rocks 75-85 F (24-29 C), breeze from the
      South, very high humidity from rains the night before 5100-5400 ft
      (1550-1650 m) Orthotics
      August 20-21
      Coronado National Forest, Santa Rita Mountains Southwest of Tucson,
      Arizona Cave Creek Trail
      8 miles
      (13 km)
      Dirt, gravel and rocks, some areas thick with weeds 60-80 F (16-27
      C), thunderstorms shortened my hiking plans due to lightning
      5700-8100 ft
      (1740-2470 m)
      Orthotics
      August 27
      Coronado National Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains just North of
      Tucson, Arizona Romero Canyon Trail
      3.6 miles
      Sand, rough granite boulders
      75-85 F (24-29 C), still 2700-3600 ft
      (820-1100 m)
      Orthotics
      September 18 Tortolita Mountains Northwest of Tucson, Arizona Alamo
      Springs Trail
      6.6 miles (10.6 km) Mix of sand and granite boulders 75-85 F (24-29
      C), light breeze 2700-3900 ft
      (820-1190 m) Orthotics
      September 25
      Coronado National Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains just North of
      Tucson, Arizona Bear Canyon Trail
      7.0 miles
      (11.3 km)
      Mix of sand and granite boulders 76-95 F (24-35 C)
      2700-3100 ft
      (820-945 m)
      Orthotics
      October 2
      Coronado National Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains just North of
      Tucson, Arizona Romero Canyon Trail reprise
      6 miles
      (9.7 km)
      Sand, rough granite boulders 75-85 F (24-29 C), still 2700-3800 ft
      (820-1160 m)
      Orthotics
      Field Usage Observations
      Ventana Canyon
      Ventana is one of the Santa Catalina Mountain canyons on the South
      side of the range, close to Tucson. It follows somewhat along the
      bottom of the canyon, traversing the dry creek bed periodically. This
      makes the treadway quite a mix of sand, gravel, and boulders.

      The Tahoes did great on this hike, no problems whatsoever.
      Arizona Trail - Kentucky Camp
      This section of the Arizona National Scenic Trail is high desert, so
      it doesn't look like one would expect of Southern Arizona:

      AZT
      Arizona National Scenic Trail near Kentucky Camp

      Its quite "green" in this area during the monsoon rains, and the
      wildflowers are reblooming. Not all the trail looked like this.
      There was another section, about 25% of the hike, on an OHV trail that
      was as rocky as the Sutherland Trail. This hike didn't have nearly
      the elevation change typical of what I have been hiking lately, so it
      did not stress the shoe's climbing prowess. I did have to slop
      through some wet areas, and the Tahoes did a good job of shedding the
      sandy mud, at least on the rubbery portion of the shoes.

      It was the second day in a row that I wore the Tahoes, and I was a bit
      surprised that the outer edges of both of my little toes were sore and
      calloused. They are rubbing a bit on the shoes, enough that two
      consecutive hiking days in them caused some irritation. I'll keep my
      eye on this in the future.
      Cave Creek Trail
      This was my first real backpacking trip with the Tahoes, and my pack
      weight was about 40 lbs (18 kg). This seems a lot for an overnight
      trip, but I was packing a lot of water because I didn't know how much
      I'd find along the trail.

      My socks were a combo of a liner plus a heavier wool hiking sock.
      This seems to be the winner combination for me with these shoes, as I
      had no hot or sore spots whatsoever. This was not a big mileage
      weekend -- my goal was just to get out and spend some relaxing time in
      the backcountry, but I really did not push the mileage on these shoes
      during this trip.

      This trail does a lot of climbing in a very short distance with few
      switchbacks, so I was huffing and puffing pretty good. I had no heel
      issues regardless of the pressure put on them by the climbing. I did
      notice some bits of gravel getting into the shoes. I brought gaiters
      with me, but neglected to put them on. Next time!
      Romero Canyon
      I get low back spasms every once in a while, and was recovering from
      an incident the day I did this hike so this was just a little
      leg-stretcher. Romero Canyon is an old standby trail for me, just a
      few minutes from my house. For the intrepid shoe tester, it throws
      just about everything a shoe needs to handle at it: altitude change,
      sand, sharp granite rocks, uneven surfaces, etc. The Tahoes did their
      usual great job. I was more careful than normal to not slip and fall,
      which I have done several times on this trail during descents, because
      my low back would not have liked that. I was glad to be wearing shoes
      with exceptional grip on the way out of the canyon.
      Alamo Springs Trail
      The weather has cooled down a bit, so I returned to the Tortolita
      Mountains and the Alamo Springs trail to try one more time to find the
      petroglyphs that are supposedly in the area. A great hike, but alas,
      no petroglyphs were found. Right after I took this picture of the
      Tahoe shoes next to some wild Morning Glories growing along the trail
      I managed to turn my ankle on a rock:

      Morning Glories

      No injuries, but it does point out that these are *not* boots with
      ankle support, they are shoes.
      Bear Canyon Trail
      Though I've been to Sabino Canyon many times, I have never taken the
      Bear Canyon Trail that begins at the same trailhead. We'd had some
      nice September rains, and I figured there would be some water running
      through Seven Falls, and I was not disappointed. The trail crosses
      the stream many times, and though I was able to rock-skip in most
      crossings, the Tahoes saw their first slosh through very shallow water
      on this hike. By tiptoeing I was able to keep my socks dry. This
      trail requires a bit of a road walk at the beginning and end, and I
      found the Tahoes to be very comfortable in this situation.

      I felt tired during this hike, and the Tahoes felt heavy on my feet.
      It seems when I'm at a high energy level the weight of the shoes
      aren't a bother, but when fatigue is a factor I notice their heft.
      Romero Canyon Reprise
      Since this was to be my last test hike with these shoes, I thought I'd
      close it out with one of my favorite trails. I have slipped more
      frequently descending this trail than any other, I think because it
      gets such heavy traffic that the dust and sand is often kicked onto
      the granite making for a slippery surface, but the Ecco Tahoes held on
      all the way down. My Plantar Fasciitis has been flaring up again, but
      with the orthotics in-place I was able to make the hike with no
      issues. Here's what the shoes looked like at the end of the test,
      standing in the stream flowing down Romero Canyon:
      Tahoes at the end of the trail
      Summary
      I am likely to use the Tahoes on future hikes mostly where I expect
      rocky conditions and I need a substantial shoe to protect my feet. I
      am not a big fan of over-the-ankle boots, so these shoes are a nice
      match for my needs in those situations. I did not have an opportunity
      to hike in wet conditions during the test period so I cannot comment
      on their performance in that dimension. The shoes held up very well
      despite the distance I hiked in them and the rocky conditions they
      were worn in.
      Additional kudos:

      Great comfort in all conditions from sand to rocks.
      Good durability and wear -- with the exception of some trail dust
      they look as good as the day they arrived.

      Final improvement suggestions:

      Not the lightest shoe on the trail, but with comfort and foot
      protection I expect a heavier shoe.
      I never did clean them, as I was concerned with ruining the
      leather. They stayed pretty clean, just got a little dusty, but I did
      not have to walk in deep mud during the test period. I found it to be
      a bit of a hassle to have to buy a specialty product to clean them.


      Many thanks to ECCO and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to
      test this product.
    • Edward
      Hello Kurt, This looks just fine, good detailed LTR. Upload at will. Thanks for a good test series, Ted
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 2, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Kurt,

        This looks just fine, good detailed LTR. Upload at will.

        Thanks for a good test series,

        Ted

        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Kurt Papke <kwpapke@...> wrote:
        >
        > Ted: Here's my final report for your editing pleasure. Thanks in
        > advance for your your work on this test. --Kurt
        > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/ECCO%20Tahoe%20shoes%20-%20Kurt%20Papke/#Long-Term_Report
        > or http://tinyurl.com/3btuyhc
        >
        > Long-Term Report
        > Field Use
        > Date
        > Location
        > Trail
        > Distance
        > Terrain/ trail type
        > Weather
        > Altitude range
        > Insoles Used
        > August 13
        > Coronado National Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains just North of
        > Tucson, Arizona Ventana Canyon Trail 7.6 miles
        > (12.2 km) Mix of sand and granite boulders 82-88 F (28-31 C), winds
        > were extremely calm, 40-74% RH 3000-4800 ft
        > (915-1465 m) Orthotics
        > August 14 Coronado National Forest, Santa Rita Mountains Southwest of
        > Tucson, Arizona Arizona Trail, Kentucky Camp trailhead 7.2 miles
        > (11.6 km) Dirt, gravel and rocks 75-85 F (24-29 C), breeze from the
        > South, very high humidity from rains the night before 5100-5400 ft
        > (1550-1650 m) Orthotics
        > August 20-21
        > Coronado National Forest, Santa Rita Mountains Southwest of Tucson,
        > Arizona Cave Creek Trail
        > 8 miles
        > (13 km)
        > Dirt, gravel and rocks, some areas thick with weeds 60-80 F (16-27
        > C), thunderstorms shortened my hiking plans due to lightning
        > 5700-8100 ft
        > (1740-2470 m)
        > Orthotics
        > August 27
        > Coronado National Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains just North of
        > Tucson, Arizona Romero Canyon Trail
        > 3.6 miles
        > Sand, rough granite boulders
        > 75-85 F (24-29 C), still 2700-3600 ft
        > (820-1100 m)
        > Orthotics
        > September 18 Tortolita Mountains Northwest of Tucson, Arizona Alamo
        > Springs Trail
        > 6.6 miles (10.6 km) Mix of sand and granite boulders 75-85 F (24-29
        > C), light breeze 2700-3900 ft
        > (820-1190 m) Orthotics
        > September 25
        > Coronado National Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains just North of
        > Tucson, Arizona Bear Canyon Trail
        > 7.0 miles
        > (11.3 km)
        > Mix of sand and granite boulders 76-95 F (24-35 C)
        > 2700-3100 ft
        > (820-945 m)
        > Orthotics
        > October 2
        > Coronado National Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains just North of
        > Tucson, Arizona Romero Canyon Trail reprise
        > 6 miles
        > (9.7 km)
        > Sand, rough granite boulders 75-85 F (24-29 C), still 2700-3800 ft
        > (820-1160 m)
        > Orthotics
        > Field Usage Observations
        > Ventana Canyon
        > Ventana is one of the Santa Catalina Mountain canyons on the South
        > side of the range, close to Tucson. It follows somewhat along the
        > bottom of the canyon, traversing the dry creek bed periodically. This
        > makes the treadway quite a mix of sand, gravel, and boulders.
        >
        > The Tahoes did great on this hike, no problems whatsoever.
        > Arizona Trail - Kentucky Camp
        > This section of the Arizona National Scenic Trail is high desert, so
        > it doesn't look like one would expect of Southern Arizona:
        >
        > AZT
        > Arizona National Scenic Trail near Kentucky Camp
        >
        > Its quite "green" in this area during the monsoon rains, and the
        > wildflowers are reblooming. Not all the trail looked like this.
        > There was another section, about 25% of the hike, on an OHV trail that
        > was as rocky as the Sutherland Trail. This hike didn't have nearly
        > the elevation change typical of what I have been hiking lately, so it
        > did not stress the shoe's climbing prowess. I did have to slop
        > through some wet areas, and the Tahoes did a good job of shedding the
        > sandy mud, at least on the rubbery portion of the shoes.
        >
        > It was the second day in a row that I wore the Tahoes, and I was a bit
        > surprised that the outer edges of both of my little toes were sore and
        > calloused. They are rubbing a bit on the shoes, enough that two
        > consecutive hiking days in them caused some irritation. I'll keep my
        > eye on this in the future.
        > Cave Creek Trail
        > This was my first real backpacking trip with the Tahoes, and my pack
        > weight was about 40 lbs (18 kg). This seems a lot for an overnight
        > trip, but I was packing a lot of water because I didn't know how much
        > I'd find along the trail.
        >
        > My socks were a combo of a liner plus a heavier wool hiking sock.
        > This seems to be the winner combination for me with these shoes, as I
        > had no hot or sore spots whatsoever. This was not a big mileage
        > weekend -- my goal was just to get out and spend some relaxing time in
        > the backcountry, but I really did not push the mileage on these shoes
        > during this trip.
        >
        > This trail does a lot of climbing in a very short distance with few
        > switchbacks, so I was huffing and puffing pretty good. I had no heel
        > issues regardless of the pressure put on them by the climbing. I did
        > notice some bits of gravel getting into the shoes. I brought gaiters
        > with me, but neglected to put them on. Next time!
        > Romero Canyon
        > I get low back spasms every once in a while, and was recovering from
        > an incident the day I did this hike so this was just a little
        > leg-stretcher. Romero Canyon is an old standby trail for me, just a
        > few minutes from my house. For the intrepid shoe tester, it throws
        > just about everything a shoe needs to handle at it: altitude change,
        > sand, sharp granite rocks, uneven surfaces, etc. The Tahoes did their
        > usual great job. I was more careful than normal to not slip and fall,
        > which I have done several times on this trail during descents, because
        > my low back would not have liked that. I was glad to be wearing shoes
        > with exceptional grip on the way out of the canyon.
        > Alamo Springs Trail
        > The weather has cooled down a bit, so I returned to the Tortolita
        > Mountains and the Alamo Springs trail to try one more time to find the
        > petroglyphs that are supposedly in the area. A great hike, but alas,
        > no petroglyphs were found. Right after I took this picture of the
        > Tahoe shoes next to some wild Morning Glories growing along the trail
        > I managed to turn my ankle on a rock:
        >
        > Morning Glories
        >
        > No injuries, but it does point out that these are *not* boots with
        > ankle support, they are shoes.
        > Bear Canyon Trail
        > Though I've been to Sabino Canyon many times, I have never taken the
        > Bear Canyon Trail that begins at the same trailhead. We'd had some
        > nice September rains, and I figured there would be some water running
        > through Seven Falls, and I was not disappointed. The trail crosses
        > the stream many times, and though I was able to rock-skip in most
        > crossings, the Tahoes saw their first slosh through very shallow water
        > on this hike. By tiptoeing I was able to keep my socks dry. This
        > trail requires a bit of a road walk at the beginning and end, and I
        > found the Tahoes to be very comfortable in this situation.
        >
        > I felt tired during this hike, and the Tahoes felt heavy on my feet.
        > It seems when I'm at a high energy level the weight of the shoes
        > aren't a bother, but when fatigue is a factor I notice their heft.
        > Romero Canyon Reprise
        > Since this was to be my last test hike with these shoes, I thought I'd
        > close it out with one of my favorite trails. I have slipped more
        > frequently descending this trail than any other, I think because it
        > gets such heavy traffic that the dust and sand is often kicked onto
        > the granite making for a slippery surface, but the Ecco Tahoes held on
        > all the way down. My Plantar Fasciitis has been flaring up again, but
        > with the orthotics in-place I was able to make the hike with no
        > issues. Here's what the shoes looked like at the end of the test,
        > standing in the stream flowing down Romero Canyon:
        > Tahoes at the end of the trail
        > Summary
        > I am likely to use the Tahoes on future hikes mostly where I expect
        > rocky conditions and I need a substantial shoe to protect my feet. I
        > am not a big fan of over-the-ankle boots, so these shoes are a nice
        > match for my needs in those situations. I did not have an opportunity
        > to hike in wet conditions during the test period so I cannot comment
        > on their performance in that dimension. The shoes held up very well
        > despite the distance I hiked in them and the rocky conditions they
        > were worn in.
        > Additional kudos:
        >
        > Great comfort in all conditions from sand to rocks.
        > Good durability and wear -- with the exception of some trail dust
        > they look as good as the day they arrived.
        >
        > Final improvement suggestions:
        >
        > Not the lightest shoe on the trail, but with comfort and foot
        > protection I expect a heavier shoe.
        > I never did clean them, as I was concerned with ruining the
        > leather. They stayed pretty clean, just got a little dusty, but I did
        > not have to walk in deep mud during the test period. I found it to be
        > a bit of a hassle to have to buy a specialty product to clean them.
        >
        >
        > Many thanks to ECCO and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to
        > test this product.
        >
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