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FR-Sea to Summit - eVent Dry Sack-Mike Pearl

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  • Mike Pearl
    Jamie,   Here s my FR amidst drying out and digging out in Central Vermont post flash floods from Tropical Storm Irene.  Well after three days of
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 3, 2011
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      Jamie,
       
      Here's my FR amidst drying out and digging out in Central Vermont post flash floods from Tropical Storm Irene.  Well after three days of intermittent power and no running water for four days.  I am able to piece together my report via two different locations.

      Cheers,
      Mike

      Link and text below.
       http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR-Sea%20to%20Summit%20Dry%20Sack-Mike%20Pearl/
      <a name="FRPT">FIELD REPORT</a>
       
      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
       
      Day hike in the rain on Mt. Tom, Woodstock, Vermont
      Elevation 700-1350 ft (213-411 m), temperature 70 F (21 C) and raining


      Seven Days Backpacking Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming
      Weather encountered; overnight lows around 40 F (4 C) and daytime highs ranged 50 - 85 F (10 - 29 C), one night of rain that began as marble size hail just after dinner.  One full day of rain and a second with intermittent showers.  The balance was partly sunny to clear and hot.

      Terrain traveled; distance 80 mi (129 km), elevation range 7300 - 8000 ft (2225 - 2438 m), conditions varied greatly from dry hard packed trails to gravelly shoreline to knee deep snow pack to fjording waist deep streams.


      Three days and two nights in Adirondack Park, New York
      Camp - Heart Lake, elevation 2,165 ft (660 m) temperature highs around 75 (24 C), lows around 50 (10 C)   with light breezes and clear skies
      Hike Day 2 - Mt Jo, elevation 2,876 ft,  2.6 mi round trip from camp to summit
      Hike Day 3 - Marcy Dam, 2,362 ft, 4.2 round trip from camp to Marcy Lake

       
      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
       
      My first time in wet conditions with the eVent Compression Dry Sack was close to home.  I woke to a beautifully rainy morning and hiked up my nearest neighbor hill, Mt. Tom.  I packed the Dry Sack with a change of clothes, trail map, two energy bars, and cell phone.  The eVent along with a second dry sack and a water bottle went into a day pack.  It rained the entire time during the 8 mi (13 km) hike.  I stopped to eat a bar around the halfway point.  The inside of my pack was slightly wet and moisture could be felt on the outside of the Dry Sack.  On the inside and everything held in the dry sack remained dry.  I quickly closed the Sack to prevent any rain from getting in and had a snack.  When I returned home I removed and emptied the Dry Sack. Every item that was inside the Sack was dry.

      The next trip was my big one for the year, in the back country of Yellowstone National Park.  The eVent gets to show off right away on day one and two.  The bragging rights are dry clothes to change into before bedding down thanks to the Dry Sack.  When packing up on day two I decided to shuffle somethings.  All clothes not being worn stayed in the eVent Compression Sack and I added my sleeping bag, bag liner and pillow.  The need to hang all odorous items was also a factor.  So all such items went into a different dry sack, see Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil report for more information.  With the reorganization I gained more pack space via compression.  And quicker camp set up by having my gear better organized.

      Two separate camera issues on the both trips prevented photos.  But here's what I have.

      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1">><<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2">>   The clothes packed on the Yellowstone trip.



                                                                               Here's before and after compression.   <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 3">><<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 4">>


      My last trip thus far was with the family to upstate New York.  This was car camping but we did have a 0.25 mi (0.4 km) walk to our lean-to.  So I appreciated being able to get as much hauled in as possible in one trip.  Not a drop of rain fell on this trip, so the keeping things dry was not an issue.  There was a fair amount of clothing though.  The compression of the Dry Sack was great for maximize space in my pack.  I was able to get two days worth of clothes for two adults and two kids down to a easy to pack size.  This included sleeping and swimming attire.   The Sack filled about a quarter of my 65 L pack when compressed.

       
      SUMMARY
       
      Thus far I am very impressed with the eVent Compression Dry Sack.  It quickly and easily compresses and keeps it's content bone dry.  The Dry Sack is easy to place in and remove from my pack.  The handle or compression straps provide strong attachment points to pull and push the sack while loading and unloading.  The Dry Sack has helped me use the space in my pack more efficiently.  It has also helped to better organize my gear.   There is only one small trouble I've had with the eVent Sack.  Sometimes if the lid flops around the compression straps get twisted.  This causes the lid and the closure to improperly align preventing compression.  A minor annoyance that is easily corrected.  The eVent Sack has performed well under all condition experienced.  It has no signs of wear or tear anywhere.

      This concludes my Field Report.  Please check back in two months for the Long Term Report.
      I would like thank Sea to Summit and BackpackGearTest.org for making this test possible.
       
       
       
      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2011.  All rights reserved.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jamie Lawrence
      Hi Mike, I watched the weather on the news and my thoughts did wonder if any of our BGTers were caught up in it. I hope you are ok and all is on the improve.
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 5, 2011
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        Hi Mike,

        I watched the weather on the news and my thoughts did wonder if any of our
        BGTers were caught up in it. I hope you are ok and all is on the improve.

        Just a couple of points below. Once fixed upload away!

        Jamie





        Link and text below.


        FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

        Day hike in the rain on Mt. Tom, Woodstock, Vermont
        Elevation 700-1350 ft (213-411 m), temperature 70 F (21 C) and raining



        Terrain traveled; distance 80 mi (129 km), elevation range 7300 - 8000 ft
        (2225 - 2438 m), conditions varied greatly from dry hard packed trails to
        gravelly shoreline to knee deep snow pack to fjording waist deep streams.

        EDIT: below you have commas in the numbers but here you don't.

        Three days and two nights in Adirondack Park, New York
        Camp - Heart Lake, elevation 2,165 ft (660 m) temperature highs around 75
        (24 C), lows around 50 (10 C) with light breezes and clear skies
        Hike Day 2 - Mt Jo, elevation 2,876 ft, 2.6 mi round trip from camp to
        summit
        Hike Day 3 - Marcy Dam, 2,362 ft, 4.2 round trip from camp to Marcy Lake


        EDIT: Need to insert metric conversions (so stupid Aussies like me know
        how far you're talking about!). there is an extra space before 2.6 mi and
        4.2 needs mi inserted.

        PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

        My first time in wet conditions with the eVent Compression Dry Sack was
        close to home. I woke to a beautifully rainy morning and hiked up my
        nearest neighbor hill, Mt. Tom. I packed the Dry Sack with a change of
        clothes, trail map, two energy bars, and cell phone. The eVent along with
        a second dry sack and a water bottle went into a day pack. It rained the
        entire time during the 8 mi (13 km) hike. I stopped to eat a bar around
        the halfway point. The inside of my pack was slightly wet and moisture
        could be felt on the outside of the Dry Sack. On the inside and
        everything held in the dry sack remained dry. I quickly closed the Sack
        to prevent any rain from getting in and had a snack. When I returned home
        I removed and emptied the Dry Sack. Every item that was inside the Sack
        was dry.

        EDIT: I am confused here are you refer to eVent and Dry Sack which I
        assume are the same thing but you actually had 2 sacks in your daypack.
        Can you make it clear what you're going to refer to the sack as and make
        it the same throughout the report??

        You also need to remove the and between inside & everything

        The next trip was my big one for the year, in the back country of
        Yellowstone National Park. The eVent gets to show off right away on day
        one and two.

        EDIT: gets should be got, you're speaking in past tense.

        The bragging rights are dry clothes to change into before bedding down
        thanks to the Dry Sack. When packing up on day two I decided to shuffle
        somethings.

        EDIT: some things is 2 separate words

        Not a drop of rain fell on this trip, so the keeping things dry was not
        an issue.

        EDIT: Remove the after so

        There was a fair amount of clothing though. The compression of the Dry
        Sack was great for maximize space in my pack.

        EDIT: maximize should be maximizing








        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mike Pearl
        Jamie, Thank you, yes things are getting closer to normal each day. Thanks for the edits, corrections made and upload complete. Mike ... From: Jamie Lawrence
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 6, 2011
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          Jamie,

          Thank you, yes things are getting closer to normal each day.

          Thanks for the edits, corrections made and upload complete.

          Mike

          --- On Tue, 9/6/11, Jamie Lawrence <jlawrence@...> wrote:

          From: Jamie Lawrence <jlawrence@...>
          Subject: [backpackgeartesters] EDIT: FR-Sea to Summit - eVent Dry Sack-Mike Pearl
          To: "Mike Pearl" <mikepearl36@...>
          Cc: BackpackGearTesters@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, September 6, 2011, 2:29 AM
















           









          Hi Mike,



          I watched the weather on the news and my thoughts did wonder if any of our

          BGTers were caught up in it. I hope you are ok and all is on the improve.



          Just a couple of points below. Once fixed upload away!



          Jamie



          Link and text below.



          FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS



          Day hike in the rain on Mt. Tom, Woodstock, Vermont

          Elevation 700-1350 ft (213-411 m), temperature 70 F (21 C) and raining



          Terrain traveled; distance 80 mi (129 km), elevation range 7300 - 8000 ft

          (2225 - 2438 m), conditions varied greatly from dry hard packed trails to

          gravelly shoreline to knee deep snow pack to fjording waist deep streams.



          EDIT: below you have commas in the numbers but here you don't.



          Three days and two nights in Adirondack Park, New York

          Camp - Heart Lake, elevation 2,165 ft (660 m) temperature highs around 75

          (24 C), lows around 50 (10 C) with light breezes and clear skies

          Hike Day 2 - Mt Jo, elevation 2,876 ft, 2.6 mi round trip from camp to

          summit

          Hike Day 3 - Marcy Dam, 2,362 ft, 4.2 round trip from camp to Marcy Lake



          EDIT: Need to insert metric conversions (so stupid Aussies like me know

          how far you're talking about!). there is an extra space before 2.6 mi and

          4.2 needs mi inserted.



          PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD



          My first time in wet conditions with the eVent Compression Dry Sack was

          close to home. I woke to a beautifully rainy morning and hiked up my

          nearest neighbor hill, Mt. Tom. I packed the Dry Sack with a change of

          clothes, trail map, two energy bars, and cell phone. The eVent along with

          a second dry sack and a water bottle went into a day pack. It rained the

          entire time during the 8 mi (13 km) hike. I stopped to eat a bar around

          the halfway point. The inside of my pack was slightly wet and moisture

          could be felt on the outside of the Dry Sack. On the inside and

          everything held in the dry sack remained dry. I quickly closed the Sack

          to prevent any rain from getting in and had a snack. When I returned home

          I removed and emptied the Dry Sack. Every item that was inside the Sack

          was dry.



          EDIT: I am confused here are you refer to eVent and Dry Sack which I

          assume are the same thing but you actually had 2 sacks in your daypack.

          Can you make it clear what you're going to refer to the sack as and make

          it the same throughout the report??



          You also need to remove the and between inside & everything



          The next trip was my big one for the year, in the back country of

          Yellowstone National Park. The eVent gets to show off right away on day

          one and two.



          EDIT: gets should be got, you're speaking in past tense.



          The bragging rights are dry clothes to change into before bedding down

          thanks to the Dry Sack. When packing up on day two I decided to shuffle

          somethings.



          EDIT: some things is 2 separate words



          Not a drop of rain fell on this trip, so the keeping things dry was not

          an issue.



          EDIT: Remove the after so



          There was a fair amount of clothing though. The compression of the Dry

          Sack was great for maximize space in my pack.



          EDIT: maximize should be maximizing



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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