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IR - Toughstake Tent Stakes - Jeff Ruhle

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  • jjruhle@ymail.com
    Here is my IR, finally. Sorry it is a bit late, I had my internet go out due to some pesky rodent gnawing through Comcast s cable to my apartment. Enjoy!
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 3, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Here is my IR, finally. Sorry it is a bit late, I had my internet go out due to some pesky rodent gnawing through Comcast's cable to my apartment. Enjoy!

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/IR%20-%20Toughstake%20Tent%20Stakes%20-%20Jeff%20Ruhle/
      OR
      http://tinyurl.com/4x8zw7t

      Take care,
      Jeff

      ****************************************************



      TOUGHSTAKE
      TEST SERIES BY
      IR
      April 03, 2011

      TESTER INFORMATION

      NAME: Jeff Ruhle
      EMAIL: jjruhle@...
      AGE: 24
      LOCATION: Winter Park, Colorado, USA
      GENDER: M
      HEIGHT: 6' 3" (1.91 m)
      WEIGHT: 170 lb (77.10 kg)

      I developed a love for backpacking while spending the semester abroad in New Zealand. I enjoy playing games and seeing how little I can pack to keep my pack light, however, I always pack a lot of food. My favorite terrain is steep, rugged, alpine terrain with more vertical and less horizontal. Living in New England, I find a lot of this terrain since the trail makers don't seem to make many switchbacks. I also am highly involved with a large number of other outdoor activities like skiing, kayaking, climbing, and biking. Generally, I like to push my comfort zone.


      INITIAL REPORT

      PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS

      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1" IMAGE CAPTION = "The Toughstakes">>Manufacturer: Toughstake
      Year of Manufacture: 2011
      Manufacturer's Website: <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.toughstake.com" LINK TEXT = "www.toughstake.com">>
      MSRP: Small - US$19.99, Medium - US$34.99, Large - US$39.99
      Listed Weight: Small -1.18 oz (33.45 g), Medium - 4.2 oz (119 g), Large - 7.0 oz (198 g)
      Measured Weight: Small -1.2 oz (34.02 g), Medium - 4.2 oz (119 g), Large - 7.2 oz (204 g)
      Color: Dark Satin Orange
      Material: 6061 T6 Aluminum

      INITIAL IMPRESSIONS

      The Toughstakes (from herein referred to as '"stakes") arrived in fairly simple packaging. The sets of small and medium stakes arrived bound together with a nylon zip-tie and the large one arrived separately in a bubble-lined envelope. The metal cables were just floating around in the box. In a rough shipping environment, this may cause some surface marks, but the stakes I got appeared to be unscathed.

      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2" IMAGE CAPTION = "You can see they are relatively thin">>The stakes themselves appear to be made of a fairly thick sheet aluminum. The small stakes are made with a thinner aluminum that the medium and large stakes, but still seem fairly flex resistance and I feel confident that they will not break as I try to shovel them into sand or snow. The wire guys seem just as durable, with one end molded directly into the wire and the other end looped and crimped around a metal ring. My only concern is that these wires, like almost all wires, will begin to fray after a while, causing dangerously sharp pieces of protruding metal. I suppose we will just have to see how they hold up to use.

      My other concern is one of functionality. I am fairly sure these will hold well in sand, but here in the High Rockies, we get some very light fluffy snow. I am dubious that even the large stake will effectively hold against high winds in this type of snow. It is spring, however, so we are getting heavy, wet, and cohesive spring snow, so I may never actually be able to test this out.

      Functionality aside, they are fairly attractive pieces of hardware. I find the anodized orange finish quite attractive. There is also a little diagram at the top of each and every stake showing the correct positioning of the stake and included with, with a phrase telling you "tent this side." These are such simple devices, and with the included diagram, I feel it would be very hard to misuse these. However, I did read somewhere that you should not pound these in, but push them in by hand. I imagine there will be several people who try to pound these in and end up ruining them.

      SUMMARY

      Things I like:
      -Ingenios design that will keep me from having to scavenge for rocks and sticks to set up deadman anchors
      -Solid construction
      -Relatively lightweight
      -The look great

      Things I don't like:
      -The included wires look like they may fray over time.

      I would like to thanks Toughstake and BackpackGreatTest.com for the opportunity to test this wonderful product. Please come back in two months for my Field Review.



      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2011. All rights reserved.
    • Coy Boy
      Hey Jeff, nice IR, I liked you photos. Just a couple of edits and comments. Coy Boy ... The small stakes are made with a thinner aluminum that the medium and
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 4, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Hey Jeff, nice IR, I liked you photos. Just a couple of edits and comments.

        Coy Boy

        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "jjruhle@..." <jjruhle@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here is my IR, finally. Sorry it is a bit late, I had my internet go out due to some pesky rodent gnawing through Comcast's cable to my apartment. Enjoy!
        >
        > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/IR%20-%20Toughstake%20Tent%20Stakes%20-%20Jeff%20Ruhle/
        > OR
        > http://tinyurl.com/4x8zw7t
        >
        > Take care,
        > Jeff

        >
        > I developed a love for backpacking while spending the semester abroad in New Zealand. I enjoy playing games and seeing how little I can pack to keep my pack light, however, I always pack a lot of food. My favorite terrain is steep, rugged, alpine terrain with more vertical and less horizontal. Living in New England, I find a lot of this terrain since the trail makers don't seem to make many switchbacks. I also am highly involved with a large number of other outdoor activities like skiing, kayaking, climbing, and biking. Generally, I like to push my comfort zone.
        The small stakes are made with a thinner aluminum that the medium and large stakes,


        Comment: since you no longer are living in NZ you might want to update you bio.

        Edit: that should be than


        The wire guys seem just as durable, with one end molded directly into the wire and the other end looped and crimped around a metal ring.

        comment: Im not sure what you mean when you say the one end molded directly into the wire. A closeup photo would help or you might just explain in more detail. Up to you.


        My only concern is that these wires, like almost all wires, will begin to fray after a while, causing dangerously sharp pieces of protruding metal. I suppose we will just have to see how they hold up to use.

        Edit; since you haven't used them you cant say they "will" fray after a while. I know you also said you would see how they hold up but I'd change it to say, usually begin to fray...

        >
        > My other concern is one of functionality. I am fairly sure these will hold well in sand, but here in the High Rockies, we get some very light fluffy snow. I am dubious that even the large stake will effectively hold against high winds in this type of snow. It is spring, however, so we are getting heavy, wet, and cohesive spring snow, so I may never actually be able to test this out.

        comment: I agree with your assessment but it kinds sounds like projection. Instead of "I am dubious" I'd say "It will be interesting to see if even the large stakes..." I know not much different but it reads less like projection to me.
      • jjruhle@ymail.com
        Thanks for the edits! I got all the corrections except for the confusion on the wire guys. I tried to snap a quick picture of it, but my camera won t focus
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 10, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks for the edits! I got all the corrections except for the confusion on the wire guys. I tried to snap a quick picture of it, but my camera won't focus close enough to show what I am trying to explain. And I can't think of any better wording that doesn't make the paragraph very awkward and clunky sounding. I will try to get a valid picture or explanation for the FR.

          Jeff

          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Coy Boy" <starnescr@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey Jeff, nice IR, I liked you photos. Just a couple of edits and comments.
          >
          > Coy Boy
          >
          > --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "jjruhle@" <jjruhle@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Here is my IR, finally. Sorry it is a bit late, I had my internet go out due to some pesky rodent gnawing through Comcast's cable to my apartment. Enjoy!
          > >
          > > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/IR%20-%20Toughstake%20Tent%20Stakes%20-%20Jeff%20Ruhle/
          > > OR
          > > http://tinyurl.com/4x8zw7t
          > >
          > > Take care,
          > > Jeff
          >
          > >
          > > I developed a love for backpacking while spending the semester abroad in New Zealand. I enjoy playing games and seeing how little I can pack to keep my pack light, however, I always pack a lot of food. My favorite terrain is steep, rugged, alpine terrain with more vertical and less horizontal. Living in New England, I find a lot of this terrain since the trail makers don't seem to make many switchbacks. I also am highly involved with a large number of other outdoor activities like skiing, kayaking, climbing, and biking. Generally, I like to push my comfort zone.
          > The small stakes are made with a thinner aluminum that the medium and large stakes,
          >
          >
          > Comment: since you no longer are living in NZ you might want to update you bio.
          >
          > Edit: that should be than
          >
          >
          > The wire guys seem just as durable, with one end molded directly into the wire and the other end looped and crimped around a metal ring.
          >
          > comment: Im not sure what you mean when you say the one end molded directly into the wire. A closeup photo would help or you might just explain in more detail. Up to you.
          >
          >
          > My only concern is that these wires, like almost all wires, will begin to fray after a while, causing dangerously sharp pieces of protruding metal. I suppose we will just have to see how they hold up to use.
          >
          > Edit; since you haven't used them you cant say they "will" fray after a while. I know you also said you would see how they hold up but I'd change it to say, usually begin to fray...
          >
          > >
          > > My other concern is one of functionality. I am fairly sure these will hold well in sand, but here in the High Rockies, we get some very light fluffy snow. I am dubious that even the large stake will effectively hold against high winds in this type of snow. It is spring, however, so we are getting heavy, wet, and cohesive spring snow, so I may never actually be able to test this out.
          >
          > comment: I agree with your assessment but it kinds sounds like projection. Instead of "I am dubious" I'd say "It will be interesting to see if even the large stakes..." I know not much different but it reads less like projection to me.
          >
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