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LTR - Obermeyer Kennedy Jacket - Kathy Waters

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  • themiddlesister1951
    Jamie, In between putting kids to bed... Here is the text of my LTR and the HTML can be found in the test folder at: http://tinyurl.com/4rlt9q8 Thanks for the
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 30, 2011
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      Jamie,

      In between putting kids to bed...

      Here is the text of my LTR and the HTML can be found in the test folder at: http://tinyurl.com/4rlt9q8

      Thanks for the edits! Gotta run!
      Kathy


      LONG-TERM REPORT


      LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      Up until February, I had been experiencing an unseasonably warm and dry winter. While the west slope mountains of the Rockies got pounded with snow, the east side (Front Range) experienced record lows in precipitation. We had one snowfall measuring less than 6 inches (15 cm). In order to find snow for our annual family Christmas Snowshoe, we had to drive into the mountains. Even on Mt. Evans, a 14K + foot (4300 m) peak, at 10K feet (3000 m), there wasn't enough snow! We ended up just hiking in winter boots but I digress.

      In February, all that changed and temperatures plunged. Average highs (daytime) were around 15 F (-9 C). And then we did have a period of 4 or 5 days where the daytime temps never broke 0 F (-18 C). Truth be told, I wasn't outside much on those days! Brrrr!

      I spent the last two weeks of February in Estes Park, Colorado where I did short (2-3 hours) dayhikes everyday. Estes Park is the eastern gateway to Rocky Mountain National Park, so the terrain is mountainous, heavily forested and begins at an elevation of 7522 ft (2293 m). While it was very sunny, it never hit the freezing mark and the winds were harsh averaging 10-15 mph (16-24 kph) with gusts up to 50 mph (81 kph). Humidity levels were higher than I'm used to in Colorado - about 41-45%.



      View in Rocky Mountain National Park in February


      I almost forgot to mention - the Obermeyer traveled to Salt Lake City in January for the annual All Mountain Demo Days, held at Solitude Mountain Resort. With snow in the forecast, I was sure to pack the Kennedy jacket. It did get very snowy (the road ended up getting closed due to conditions) and cold.

      Other than the two above listed trips, all of my outdoor activities have been in the mountains of Colorado, mostly south central Colorado in the Fremont, Cooper and Wet mountain ranges.

      So, I'd venture to say, I've worn the Kennedy on at least a dozen occasions - day snowshoe or boot hikes and numerous other shorter hikes around our property, down the road to the mail box (5 miles/8 km round trip) and while sneaking treats to my neighbors' horses!


      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      During the last couple of months, I have continued to be impressed by the performance of the Obermeyer Kennedy jacket. I love all the nifty extras; such as the soft collar liner which keeps my chin from getting chafed when I wear it in the "stand-up" mode. This has saved my skin from getting a rash from rubbing on more than one occasion when I'm "turtling" against the wind.

      When it comes to wind, Colorado winds blow with the best of them! It's been a mostly mild winter, but a very windy one and thanks to the Kennedy jacket, I have not had to suffer. As cold as it got during our coldest days, I never felt any penetration of wind through the Kennedy. I could feel the wind whistling right through my pants at times, but my core remained toasty. So much so, that at times, I needed to unzip the pit zips and the front zipper to cool down. Usually, that would be sufficient to lower my body temperature, but unless it was a very sharp, constant wind, in temperatures over 40-ish F (22 C), the Kennedy would be too warm for me during anything more than a walk through the park sort of excursion.

      Unfortunately, I can't really comment on how the Obermeyer Kennedy holds up to the challenges of precipation as Colorado has been in a near drought situation for months. The only time I experienced any real moisture in the air was in Utah when it snowed like the dickens for part of the morning during the Outdoor Retail Show in Salt Lake City. I was quite pleased with how dry I stayed even when I couldn't see from the snow falling so thickly.

      I have to restate (see above), the Kennedy is the most stylish of my jackets. I continue to have people comment on how attractive the jacket is and my daughter-in-law covets it openly.

      Through no fault of the jacket, now that my testing is done, I probably will only wear it for casual use and snowshoe/cross country skiing trips. The reason for this is my choice of white fabric (because it was so cute) rather than going practical with a darker color. White just isn't for me when there is any possibility of getting dirty, 'cause I will get dirty!

      I've washed the jacket very carefully a couple of times now; zipping up all the zippers, fastening the hook-and-loop cuff adjustments, turning it inside out and sometimes even remember to take out my ever-present tube of lip balm! I washed it separately in cold water, gentle cycle, using powdered laundry detergent, no bleach and no fabric softener. While Obermeyer indicated the Kennedy can be machine dried, I have opted to have it dry on a plastic hanger. Mainly the jacket looks good, but the cuffs just aren't as clean as I'd like.

      No worry! Snowshoeing is a relatively clean venture and I can't wait to get in some more snow action in my Kennedy in the coming weeks!


      SUMMARY

      I've had a blast wearing the Obermeyer Kennedy jacket. It's warm, stylish, sheds moisture and has tons of neat features, like the "built-in" eye glasses/goggles' cleaning cloth. Generously-sized pit zips help to ventilate my core when my activity level and body temperature go up but when I'm taking a break or at camp, I now know I can count on the Kennedy to keep me from becoming a popsicle when outside temps dip below freezing. Even the strongest winds don't penetrate the jacket to chill me.

      As I type this, I'm sweltering in 90 F (32 C) temperatures in Florida (have been for 2 weeks) but am looking forward to getting back to my beloved mountains in Colorado where the low this morning was 28 F (2 C). My son should have my Kennedy jacket waiting for me at the airport and I'll be ready for a snowshoe hike the following weekend. But first, he'll have to wrestle it away from his wife who has been wearing it to work in the morning when she rides her motor scooter into the city! She'll just have to get her own now!

      Thank you to BackpackGearTest.org and Sport Obermeyer for the opportunity to try out the Kennedy.

      Kathleen (Kathy) Waters
    • Jamie
      Hi Kathy, I ve had 2 reads through and can t spot any edits. Good luck with the battle for the jacket with your daughter-in-law!! Jamie
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 2, 2011
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        Hi Kathy,

        I've had 2 reads through and can't spot any edits.

        Good luck with the battle for the jacket with your daughter-in-law!!

        Jamie
      • Kathy Waters
        Jamie, I totally missed copying my final Note section for the Obermeyer! So sorry, but can you give it a quick read, please? Kathy The Obermeyer Kennedy
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 6, 2011
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          Jamie,

          I totally missed copying my final "Note" section for the Obermeyer! So sorry, but can you give it a quick read, please?

          Kathy

          The Obermeyer Kennedy Jacket features the RECCO® system. According to the RECCO® website, "The RECCO® Rescue System is two-part technology. Ski resorts and rescue teams carry RECCO® detectors. The detector sends out a directional search signal, which is echoed by RECCO® reflectors worn by skiers, riders and other outdoors people."

          Literally, thousands of resorts around the world use the RECCO® detectors and the Obermeyer Kennedy jacket has the reflectors sewn into the jacket.

          I talked with a member of the Search and Rescue team at a resort in Utah and they made it very clear that the RECCO® system (as does RECCO®) IS NOT a substitute for an avalanche beacon. The detector needs to be just about on top of the reflector for a victim to be located. The RECCO® system is more a recovery tool than a rescue tool and should not be relied on as a primary safety feature.
          ________________________________________________--
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Jamie
          To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2011 12:37 AM
          Subject: [backpackgeartesters] No EDITS - Obermeyer Kennedy Jacket - Kathy Waters



          Hi Kathy,

          I've had 2 reads through and can't spot any edits.

          Good luck with the battle for the jacket with your daughter-in-law!!

          Jamie





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