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LTR - Lowa Renegade Boots - Mike Mosack

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  • Michael
    Please accept for your editing pleasure, my LTR for the Lowa Renegade GTX Boots. I have included my HTML link here and the specific text portion below that.
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 31, 2010
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      Please accept for your editing pleasure, my LTR for the Lowa Renegade GTX Boots. I have included my HTML link here and the specific text portion below that.
      Have a very Happy New Year!
      Mike

      http://tinyurl.com/3akvw2d


      LONG-TERM REPORT

      LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      During this testing phase, all of my time has been in Afghanistan and included almost entirely, rocky and or gravel terrain with a coating of dust and sand over everything. Very dry (low humidity) climate usually under clear and sunny skies with temperatures ranging from below freezing 32 F (0 C) at night to 75 F (24 C) during the day. Temperatures are continually dropping now as this region is entering the winter season. I have had the opportunity to wear the boots on numerous day time and night time hikes of varying distances ranging from 1 mile (1.5 km) to 21 miles (34 km).
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 13" IMAGE CAPTION = "Mazar-e Sharif Afghanistan">>

      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      During this testing phase, I covered approximately 145 miles (233 km) with 29 nights in the field. To date, I have covered approximately 190 miles (306 km) and have 41 nights in the field while wearing these boots. As a result, I have found the following...

      Comfort
      These boots remain very comfortable and I often do not even think about my footwear while wearing them. I have never suffered any "hot spots" or blisters. I recommend wearing socks that are high enough on the ankle to reach the top of the boot. My low cut socks allowed direct skin contact with the upper cuff of the boot and I experienced isolated uncomfortable rubbing while I walked. A quick change of socks eliminated that and my feet were again very happy. The tongue of the boot stays centered throughout the day and is well padded keeping my feet and ankles from feeling the laces even when they're tied tightly.

      Construction and Durability
      Initially, I was concerned about two bubbles I found in my left boot's rubber sole. I have monitored these bubbles and am happy to report that so far, there is no evidence of any separation, breakage or deterioration of the sole as a result of these. I think their specific locations on the sole assisted in their stability as they are both in locations where there is virtually no flexing of the surrounding rubber during normal use. I would be more concerned if they had been located in other areas where there was a higher range of motion that could cause a more damaging effect. The sole adhesion to the leather upper remains intact and I have not found any areas of separation. The soles and tread pattern also do not show any obvious or excessive wear or damage from the miles I have worn them either. I am very impressed by this.

      The stitching remains intact as well as the leather uppers. My hiking experiences during this test did not bring me to areas where thistle was present and to be honest, I am one that tries to find solid and flat foot holds wherever possible. Having said this, I am usually pretty easy on my feet and I take care not to damage my boots.

      I have found that for me, the boot laces are longer than I like, but I am also not one to usually wrap my laces around my ankles as a part of tying them. I plan to either cut them down some or replace them with shorter ones. My military training has taught me to tuck my laces into my boots after tying so they do not catch on the eyelets of the other boot and for a neater appearance. When I forget to do this, I have on rare occasions inadvertently untied my laces when the loops catch on my other boot's eyelet as it passes while I walk.

      The attractive and convenient loops on the back of the boot's upper which by design are to assist in pulling on the boots really are unnecessary. These boots open up so well when untied that I can easily slip my foot inside without needing such a feature.

      Breathability
      I should note that while I am more used to wearing lightweight well vented or mesh running shoes, I don't think that these boots breathe as well as others I have owned. The very hot temperatures I have experienced in Afghanistan were always tempered with very low humidity so my feet did not usually sweat that much or at all. Still, these boots are well sealed and waterproofed and I have enjoyed every step.

      Cleaning
      I did not find where cleaning of my boots beyond a rinsing in a low level creek as I walked through and dry brushing to knock off excess dirt, was a necessity. Most of my time in these boots has been in desert areas where the climate and terrain was very dry and dusty. These boots have held up very well. I have not waterproofed or applied any other leather care products to date and have found that there is no evidence that I need to as yet. I would consider applying something to them if my travels took me into a climate or terrain where moisture was more of a reoccurring probability.

      Color
      The color and texture of the leather uppers have held up well and show no signs of fading or discoloration. Shiny marks on the leather can be brushed away too.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 12" IMAGE CAPTION = "See you in Yosemite!">>


      SUMMARY

      These boots have become my favorite footwear and I have appreciated the times I have been able to wear them. I am looking forward to my upcoming trip back to California's Yosemite National Park, USA in April and will be sure to have these with me because I am wearing them almost every day anyway. Maybe I'll see you on the trail. I'll be easy to spot, just look for my boots!

      I wish to thank Lowa and BackpackGearTest.org for the opportunity to test these boots.





      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2010. All rights reserved.
    • Derek Hansen
      Mike, Thanks for your report! Excellent photos and insight on the boots. Here are my edits following the BGT convention: EDIT: Must Edit: Consider Comment:
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 4, 2011
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        Mike,

        Thanks for your report! Excellent photos and insight on the boots. Here are my edits following the BGT convention:

        EDIT: Must
        Edit: Consider
        Comment: Muse

        Feel free to upload! I wish you a safe journey back to the states!

        Best,

        ~derek

        # # #

        > 1 mile (1.5 km) to 21 miles (34 km).
        Comment: You can get away with just the "mi" abbreviation in both cases here.



        > My hiking experiences during this test did not bring me to
        > areas where thistle was present and to be honest,
        > I am one that tries to find solid and flat foot holds wherever possible.
        Edit: The first time I read through this it flowed too quickly. You have two separate thoughts here, and I'm not entirely sure that hiking through thistle is equal to "solid and flat food holds". I would recommend adding an em-dash or semi-colon to separate these throughts or just break it into two sentences.


        > boot's upper which by design
        EDIT: Comma before "which"


        > are to assist in pulling on the boots really are unnecessary.
        Edit: I would consider adding a comma in here to break out the parenthetical thought, perhaps something like:

        1. The attractive and convenient loops on the back of the boot's upper (which by design are to assist in pulling on the boots) are unnecessary.

        2. The attractive and convenient loops on the back of the boot's upper (which are designed to assist in pulling the boots on) are unnecessary.


        > wearing lightweight well vented or mesh running shoes
        EDIT: lightweight, well-vented, or mesh


        > I did not find where cleaning of my boots beyond
        > a rinsing in a low level creek as I walked through
        > and dry brushing to knock off excess dirt, was a necessity.
        Edit: I think this sentence was just too passive and I slogged through it a few times. I would almost suggest breaking this into two sentences to separate the two thoughts: 1) You didn't need to clean the boots that often; 2) walking through a stream on occasion did the job.


        > California's Yosemite National Park, USA
        Comment: I don't think you need to add the "USA" since you have stated "California", which is clear.
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