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FR- ULA Ohm Backpack- Nancy Griffith

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  • Nancy Griffith
    Hi Pam, I ve posted my FR for the ULA Ohm.  Here s the text and link. Thanks for taking a look and providing edits. Enjoy the holiday weekend! Nancy
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1, 2010
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      Hi Pam,

      I've posted my FR for the ULA Ohm.  Here's the text and link.
      Thanks for taking a look and providing edits.
      Enjoy the holiday weekend!

      Nancy

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR-%20ULA%20Ohm%20backpack-%20Nancy%20Griffith/#FRPT


      http://tinyurl.com/2fu9meg
       
      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
       
      Over the Field Testing period, I used the pack for 3 backpacking trips and 2 day
      hikes for a total of 9 days.  One trip was a snowshoe backpack in deep spring
      snow while the others were more typical backpacking.
      Snow Camping in 7 to 9 ft (2 to 3 m) of snow pack:
      Loon Lake, Van Vleck Trail, Sierra Nevada, California; 6 mi (10 km); 6,327 to
      7,000 ft (1,928 to 2,134 m); 28 to 55 F (-2 to 13 C); clear with some windy
      conditions; 24 lb (11 kg)
      Backpacking:
      Western States Trail, Sierra Nevada, California; 3 days; 18 mi (30 km); 1,800 to
      4,365 ft (549 to 1,330 m) elevation; 45 to 72 F (7 to 22 C); clear to partly
      cloudy to light rain conditions; pack weight 24 lb (11 kg)
      Mumford Bar Trail, Sierra Nevada, California; 2 days; 13 mi (21 km); 2,640 to
      5,360 ft (805 to 1634 m) elevation; 53 to 90 F (12 to 32 C); clear conditions;
      pack weight 23 lb (10 kg)
      Day Hiking:
      Western States Trail, Sierra Nevada, California; 5 mi (8 km); 3,520 to 1,820 ft
      (1,073 to 555 m) elevation; cloudy to light rain conditions; pack weight 15 lb
      (7 kg)
      Bake Oven Trail, Sierra Nevada, California; 10 mi (16 km); 1,630 to 3,520 ft
      (497 to 1,073 m); 65 to 80 F (18 to 27 C); clear to partly cloudy conditions; 15
      lb (7 kg)
       
      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
       
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Pad strapped on">>
      Loading the Pack:
      For our snow camping trip, I carried a bulkier load than normal due to needing
      extra clothes, dry bag, the heavier tent, extra foam pad and more fuel for
      melting snow.  While first packing it seemed that I was filling the pack to
      capacity.  It all fit in quite well and I didn't have any trouble closing the
      top although it was quite full.  On the next two backpacking trips, my pack
      contents fit in easier.  As recommended I tried to pack things vertically so
      that the pack could be compressed from the sides.  There was quite a bit of room
      to compress which made a nice solid pack for balance.  On the day hikes I had
      odd loads of chairs, sandals, lunch, extra clothes and other miscellaneous items
      but by packing things vertically I was able to compress everything into a
      comfortable arrangement.
      I folded my insulated air mattress sleeping pad and secured it in the back as
      additional back support along with the foam pad that came with the pack.  On the
      day hikes, I did not use my air mattress as back support and only used the thin
      foam pad.  I did not notice any reduction in support and didn't even realize
      that I had forgotten to use it until after the hikes.
      Straps and Pockets:
      On the snow trip, I strapped the foam pad on the outside using the hand straps. 
      They fit around the rolled pad and then I clipped the hand straps to the ice axe
      strap and top closure strap.  It worked well since the pad is quite light and
      didn't throw off the load balance.  I backpack and hike with trekking poles, so
      I did not use the hand straps for resting my hands.
      I found that the hip pockets hold an amazing amount of stuff.  I typically store
      small items in my pants pockets but I was wearing shorts (with no pockets) on
      the snow-camping trip.  Yes, the hike was warm!  I took all of those small items
      and fit them easily into the two hip pockets.  Here is an example of how much
      fits into just ONE of the hip pockets without overstuffing it.  The hip pockets
      were easy to access and the zipper easy to operate while hiking.  <<IMAGE GOES
      HERE. ALT TEXT = "Hip Pocket Contents">>
      I used the hydration reservoir pocket and found it very easy to route the
      drinking tube through the slot in the pack.  I found that my 2 liter (70 oz)
      water reservoir is a bit smaller than the pocket so it would slide down to the
      bottom.  This allowed the contents of my pack to shift over the reservoir which
      then allowed the tube to become restricted.  I am thinking of stapling the
      pocket near the bottom to make it a bit shorter and to better fit my reservoir. 
      The water bottle holder straps were helpful for keeping my mouthpiece from
      flopping onto the ground.  I also used them for hanging my watch.  I did not use
      them for water bottles.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "wallet pocket">>
      I used the mesh pocket as a wallet for my (and my husband's) drivers license,
      credit card, fishing license and cash.  It was fairly easy to keep it out of my
      way while packing by flipping it over toward the outside of the pack.  Then when
      I finished packing, I simply flipped it back over on top of the pack contents. 
      It worked fine, but I didn't really see the need for this special pocket nor for
      having it in such a prominent location since I don't need my wallet while
      backpacking.  I typically use a zip-top plastic bag which I tuck into a corner
      of my pack to keep it out of the way.
      I used the outer mesh pocket for drying clothing that I had washed in camp and
      wasn't quite dry by the time we were leaving camp.  Clothing continued to dry in
      the pocket and I really like having this option rather than hanging laundry off
      of my pack.  I also used it for keeping my sun hat and a magazine.  The pocket
      is the exact size as the width of a magazine so it fit perfectly without extra
      slop from side-to-side.
      The two side pockets are very large and the elastic at the top kept my contents
      secure.  I used them for fishing rods, fishing lures, insect repellent, toilet
      paper, a map and a folding chair.  All of these contents fit well, were easy to
      access and were easy to secure to the pack.  These are the first backpack side
      pockets that I can actually reach by myself.
      Fit and Comfort:
      During my hikes, I like to alternate between carrying most of the weight on my
      shoulders to carrying it on my hips.  I noticed that the padding on the hip belt
      was limited and seemed to end right at my hip bone.  This made my hip bone get
      really sore over the miles and by the next day it felt bruised when I tightened
      the hip belt against it again.  The shoulder straps were comfortable and didn't
      cause any discomfort.
      In general I found the torso length to be a bit long for me despite being
      mid-range for the medium size.  I had trouble having enough adjustment length. 
      I ended up with the shoulder straps fully extended and still had the shoulder
      strap above my shoulder.
      Durability:
      The pack seems to have good durability.  There were several times that I
      squeezed through downed trees, branches and bushes which brushed against the
      pack.  I cannot see any evidence of snags or damage on the pack.  The straps,
      buckles and shock-cord are completely intact and in like-new condition.
       
      SUMMARY
       
      The ULA Equipment Ohm backpack is a very lightweight pack with a ton of
      features.  I was pleasantly surprised at how well it functioned in the field.
      GREAT:
      Lightweight
      Hip pocket volume
      Ability to reach side pockets
      Durability
      Extra pockets and extra straps are removable
      Not so great:
      Hip belt does not extend over my hip bone
      Don't see the need for the wallet pocket, but I'm glad that it is removable
      This concludes my Field Report.  Check back in two months for my Long-Term
      Report.  Thanks to ULA Equipment and BackpackGearTest.org for allowing me to
      participate in this test.
       
       
       
      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2010.  All rights reserved.




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    • pamwyant
      Hi Nancy, Good report. I looked it over closely, but did not find anything to edit. I do have just one comment, which does not require changes, but might be
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 5, 2010
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        Hi Nancy,

        Good report. I looked it over closely, but did not find anything to edit. I do have just one comment, which does not require changes, but might be something for you to think about on your next trip out.
        "It worked fine, but I didn't really see the need for this special pocket nor for
        having it in such a prominent location since I don't need my wallet while
        backpacking. I typically use a zip-top plastic bag which I tuck into a corner
        of my pack to keep it out of the way."

        Comment: From the photo, it looks like the pocket could be handy to keep small electronics like a cell phone, MP3 player, etc. that you might not use on the trail, but might want in camp or during a re-supply town visit on longer hikes. It might also be useful for a headlamp, first aid kit, toiletries, etc. if you were hiking in rain and didn't want to keep them in an outside pocket where they might get wet. Just my thoughts – I know we all have our favorite ways of packing.
      • Nancy Griffith
        Hi Pam, Thanks for reviewing my FR.  I ve deleted the test file and uploaded.  I like your comments on the wallet pocket and will keep that in mind as I
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 6, 2010
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          Hi Pam,

          Thanks for reviewing my FR.  I've deleted the test file and uploaded.  I like
          your comments on the wallet pocket and will keep that in mind as I continue to
          test. 


          Nancy





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