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FR - Osprey Atmos 35 - AB

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  • Andrew Buskov
    FR - Osprey Atmos 35 - AB Here ya go! Have fun. HTML can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/ycw946s AB _____________________ Field Report: November 30, 2009
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 30, 2009
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      FR - Osprey Atmos 35 - AB

      Here ya go! Have fun.
      HTML can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/ycw946s


      AB

      _____________________
      Field Report: November 30, 2009

      Field Conditions:
      I was able to use this pack a total of four occasions within this testing
      phase. A multiple night session in Rocky Mountain National park served as
      the first test. Temperature ranges during the outing ranged from 70's (21 C)
      during the day to below freezing (-0 C) during the night and an elevation
      around 9000 - 10,000 ft (2750 - 3050 m) throughout the trip. I was also able
      to use this on a couple of day hikes in the Western Kentucky area. The
      temperature for the outings ranged from 50 - 65 F (10 - 18 C) over the
      period of 3 different days. Elevation here is roughly 400 ft (120 m) with
      little change in terrain as opposed to Rocky.
      Performance:
      As I was able to use this pack on both multi-night hikes and day hikes, I
      was able to get a better feel fro the range of use that the Osprey Atmos 35
      provides. Starting off with a multi-night trip to Rocky Mountain National
      Park I was able to fit a wide variety of gear inside the pack. Because I
      needed more gear due to the vast weather changes I was to expect at various
      altitudes, I found that I quickly ran out of usable space in the main
      compartment. Let me begin by listing the gear that I was able to take:

      * 15 F (-9 C) Big Agnes Lost Ranger sleeping bag
      * Outdoor Research Hydroseal DryComp AirX compression sack
      * Outdoor Research SynMat Lt 7 air mattress
      * Hennessy Explorer Ultralite A-Sym
      * MSR MicroWorks water filter
      * Montbell UL Thermawrap Parka
      * Jetboil PCS Stove
      * Thermal Underwear
      * 2 L CamelBak Insulated StoAway
      * 50 ft (15 m) rope bag for hanging food
      * Map, Compass, and Rite in the Rain Outdoor Journal



      * Navigational Guide
      * Toiletries
      * Food Cozy & Thermal Seat Pad
      * Petzl Tikka Plus Headlamp, Extra Batteries
      * Various medical supplies
      * 3 days food & cooking supplies
      * Rain cover
      * 2 changes of clothing (socks, undies, pants, shirts)
      * Other miscellaneous items (keys, brochures, etc.)


      While I was able to cram all of the above gear into my pack, finding and
      shuffling gear inside the stuffed pack proved to be a major problem. I
      initially thought that having a large front opening would prove a better
      option for finding gear at the bottom of my pack. However, I found this to
      be completely against what I thought. So many times I lost almost the entire
      pack contents on the ground due to trying to find something near the bottom.
      It was as if my pack was vomiting its contents all over the place. I
      eventually got fed up and decided not to dig around in my pack unless it was
      absolutely necessary. This is not how I want my trips to go. I prefer
      comfort and will only sacrifice if absolutely necessary.

      That being said, I found exactly the opposite true on my day hikes where the
      pack wasn't as full. Having a large zippered opening did indeed allow me to
      reach gear at the bottom of my pack without too much trouble. I was able to
      get out a jacket, snacks, and even my heavy down coat without having gear
      fall all over. I think the difference is definitely due to the way items
      were packed and the shuffle room that I had when the pack was not stuffed to
      the brim with necessary cold weather gear.

      I found that during my multi-night outings the best place for my hydration
      bladder was in the air space between the pack and my back as opposed to
      inside the main compartment. I did feel a bit cooler as the colder waster
      was against my back, but this also provided a bit of extra cushion against
      the overstuffed pack. On the flip side, having it in the main compartment
      proved to be best during day hikes. My back was able to breathe more, and
      the pack just felt more comfortable during the whole trip. However, having
      the ability to change whenever I want is definitely a plus, and something
      that I would have considered if I were purchasing this in a retail store.

      I have not had any additional problems with any of the zippers during this
      testing phase. I feel that I might have been a bit more gentle than normal,
      but it was nothing that was overly difficult. it was more of a mindset since
      I had experienced problems in the beginning. I'll continue to keep an eye on
      this throughout the testing phase, but I'm inclined to think it was just a
      fluke based on the experiences I've had to date.

      I'm still very pleased with the operation of the Osprey Atmos 35, and to
      date I have not found anything I haven't liked.
    • asklarry99
      Hi AB- Here are your edits for the Osprey Atmos, using standard conventions. A few small EDITS, and a couple of other wording suggestions for your
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 1, 2009
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        Hi AB-

        Here are your edits for the Osprey Atmos, using standard conventions. A few small EDITS, and a couple of other wording suggestions for your consideration.

        Have fun with the pack on the trail...see you in 2 months.

        -larry



        Comment: Could you make the Field Report + date in bold font, so it at least equal to the other headers?

        Edit: Temperature ranges during the outing ranged from 70's (21 C) during the day to below freezing (-0 C) during the night and an elevation around 9000 - 10,000 ft (2750 - 3050 m) throughout the trip.
        >>>I would suggest changing "Temperature ranges…" to "Temperatures…" at the beginning of the sentence. Also, you could remove the negative sign before the 0 C and maybe change the wording to say "…*at* an elevation around 9000 ft…". Or not.

        Edit: little change in terrain as opposed to Rocky.
        >>>Consider expanding "Rocky" to "Rocky Mountain State Park"

        EDIT: I was able to get a better feel fro the range of use
        >>>*for*

        Edit: vast weather changes I was to expect at various altitudes,
        >>>…changes I was expecting at …

        Edit: However, I found this to be completely against what I thought.
        >>>This reads funny to me. How about "However, I found the opposite to be true." Or something like that.

        Edit: So many times I lost almost the entire pack contents on the ground due to trying to find something near the bottom.
        >>>This also reads a little strange. How about using "dumped" or "emptied" instead of "lost"?

        EDIT: I did feel a bit cooler as the colder waster
        >>>water

        EDIT: it was more of a mindset since
        >>>Please capitalize "it" at the beginning of the sentence.
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