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FR - Vasque Breeze LT GTX - Tim Tessier

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  • Tim Tessier
    Below find the field report for the Vasque Breeze boots. The html is in the test folder and can be found at:
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 30, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Below find the field report for the Vasque Breeze boots.



      The html is in the test folder and can be found at:
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR%20-%20Vasque%20Bre\
      eze%20GTX%20Boots%20-%20Tim%20Tessier/
      <http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/FR%20-%20Vasque%20Br\
      eeze%20GTX%20Boots%20-%20Tim%20Tessier/>



      The text version of the FR portion follows:

      Field Report - June 30, 2009

      To date I have had a number of opportunities to wear the boots around
      town, on a couple of day-hikes and on two backpacking trips.

      One of the day-hikes was in a local park. I walked for approximately 4
      miles (6.4 km) on a shady woodland trail without any significant
      elevation change. The other was in Hanging Rock State Park in North
      Carolina. This trail starts as a broad, heavily used wooded trail, and
      then involves a scramble up slickrock when you reach Hanging Rock
      itself. This hike involves a climb of several hundred feet from the
      parking area to the top of the rock itself. Both of these hikes were on
      warm, 80 F (27 C) days, under clear skies.

      The first backpacking trip was in the Great Smoky Mountains National
      Park to Mount Sterling. This trip involved a very strenuous 4 mile (6.4
      km) climb in which we gained almost 2,500 feet (762 m). The weather was
      lovely, with clear skies, low humidity and a cooling breeze blowing on a
      day that was in the approximately 75 F (24 C) range at the base of the
      mountain and approximately 60 F (16 C) at the crest. This trail, while
      long and steep, is a dirt path through the woods and did not
      significantly test the soles in terms of either traction or sturdiness.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 6">>
      Finally, I took these boots to "the graveyard of boots". This area is
      otherwise known as the Shining Rock Wilderness Area. We followed a
      trail that was originally built in the 1920s as a railroad to expedite
      logging the area's trees. Now the trail is extremely rocky with
      everything from bedrock, to boulders, to railroad ballast, to tiny
      pebbles. The rockiness is made more of a challenge by the springs that
      bubble out of the cut grade and flow across the trail. When you reach
      Shining Rock itself you can scramble and climb on an exposed quartz rock
      face. When we went in on Saturday the weather was absolutely perfect
      with highs around 80 F (27C) and a stiff wind. However, we awoke Sunday
      morning to a driving rain that was not forecast and did not relent.
      Needless to say, these boots received a thorough thrashing.

      For dayhiking in clear weather I can say these boots are an absolute
      joy! They are lightweight, breathe extremely well, and are quite
      comfortable. With no break-in required you can buy these on Saturday
      and head for your favorite trail on Sunday. I found it noticeably
      easier to keep up with my 18 year old son who normally can walk his old
      man into the ground going up a steep grade. The traction on the slick
      rock of Hanging Rock was terrific and I can't report one single slip or
      misstep due to any issue with the boots.

      When carrying a load on the Mt Sterling trip in the Smokies I found them
      to be still adequate, though there was noticeably less arch support than
      I am accustomed to. Traction was no problem on the dirt path. The
      lightweight and breathability of the boots was a welcome change for me
      compared to other boots I have worn on this sort of terrain. I felt, on
      this trip that the lightweight and cool comfort of these boots was a
      fair trade-off to have a little less arch support and general sole
      support than I like.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 7">>
      The Shining Rock trip was designed to be, and indeed was, an acid test
      for these boots. As mentioned above, the trail we followed out to
      Shining Rock itself is quite rocky. As we followed this trail carrying
      a fairly lightweight (for me) 20 lb. (9.7 kg) my feet began to get sore
      from the constant pounding. When we reached the rock itself I scrambled
      about 30 feet up the face of it and the traction was terrific. Leaving
      there we took a different trail and crossed two ridges on a narrow trail
      that was still somewhat rocky. After about 8 miles (13 km) total
      distance we made camp. I was grateful for the chance to remove my
      boots, and more grateful for the Advil I had in my first aid kit.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 8">>
      We awoke Sunday morning to a pouring rain that was not forecast. I had
      a jacket with me but no rain pants or gaiters. We had less than 2
      miles (3 km) back to the truck but my feet were completely soaked when
      we arrived. I am not sure at this writing if that was due to water
      running down my legs and into the tops of the boots, or if they boots
      were leaking but, in any event, the boots were soaked through by the
      time we arrived at the truck. It is my opinion, which will be proved or
      disproved in further testing, that the boots did not stop the water. I
      say this because they felt soaked completely through in less than 2
      hours of use in the rain.

      Summary

      These boots are advertised as a crossover boot, between a fastpacker
      boot and a true mid-weight hiking boot. I have to say, that is a very
      fair representation of their capabilities.

      These boots are terrific for day hiking or light duty backpacking. They
      are fine on forest trails that are not particularly rocky if the user is
      not carrying a heavy load. However, on a rocky trail, they do not, to
      my mind, provide the level of stiffness and protection in the soles that
      I personally prefer.

      They did not seem to be waterproof, though this will be tested more
      thoroughly in my Long Term Report.

      This concludes my Field Report. Please check back in late August for my
      Long Term Report.

      I wish to thank backpackgeartest.org and Vasque for the chance to review
      this excellent product.



      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2009. All rights reserved.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • AndrĂ© Corterier
      ... H lo Tim, nice report! Pls find your edits below. ... ... ### EDIT: Hold! This is the Projection Police! Cease and Desist immediately! (Kidding.
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        > EDIT: FR - Vasque Breeze LT GTX - Tim Tessier

        H'lo Tim, nice report! Pls find your edits below.

        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Tim Tessier" <timothy_tessier@...> wrote:
        <snip>
        > For dayhiking in clear weather I can say these boots are an absolute
        > joy! They are lightweight, breathe extremely well, and are quite
        > comfortable. With no break-in required you can buy these on Saturday
        > and head for your favorite trail on Sunday.

        ### EDIT: Hold! This is the Projection Police! Cease and Desist immediately! (Kidding. Somewhat.)
        Tim, you are claiming that this would be my experience when you have no basis of knowing that (I'm not even sure if I could buy them on Saturday, much less if I would like hiking in them on Sunday without breaking them in first). This is a particularly pertinent example of the evils of projection - go look at Jenn's report and you'll see what I mean. So please rephrase to indicate clearly that you are reporting your own personal experience (For example, I would rephrase the previous sentence along the lines of "I have found these boots to be lightweight, ..." and discard the sentence with the projection.

        <snip>
        Traction was no problem on the dirt path. The
        > lightweight

        EDIT: light weight (two words) (or else you'd be looking for a noun like "lightweightness" and let's not go there...
        ;-)

        and breathability of the boots was a welcome change for me
        > compared to other boots I have worn on this sort of terrain. I felt, on
        > this trip that the lightweight

        EDIT: light weight

        and cool comfort of these boots was a
        > fair trade-off to have a little less arch support and general sole
        > support than I like.

        > <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 7">>
        > The Shining Rock trip was designed to be, and indeed was, an acid test
        > for these boots. As mentioned above, the trail we followed out to
        > Shining Rock itself is quite rocky. As we followed this trail carrying
        > a fairly lightweight (for me) 20 lb. (9.7 kg)

        EDIT: no period after "lb" per our conversion chart at the bottom of this page: http://www.backpackgeartest.org/convert.html

        my feet began to get sore
        > from the constant pounding. When we reached the rock itself I scrambled
        > about 30 feet

        EDIT: metric conversion, please

        up the face of it and the traction was terrific. Leaving
        > there we took a different trail and crossed two ridges on a narrow trail
        > that was still somewhat rocky. After about 8 miles (13 km) total
        > distance we made camp. I was grateful for the chance to remove my
        > boots, and more grateful for the Advil I had in my first aid kit.

        Edit: You may wish to include a statement to which degree the fact that you required medication related to your footwear rather than the trail itself.

        > <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 8">>
        > We awoke Sunday morning to a pouring rain that was not forecast. I had
        > a jacket with me but no rain pants or gaiters. We had less than 2
        > miles (3 km) back to the truck but my feet were completely soaked when
        > we arrived. I am not sure at this writing if that was due to water
        > running down my legs and into the tops of the boots, or if they

        EDIT: the

        boots
        > were leaking but, in any event, the boots were soaked through by the
        > time we arrived at the truck. It is my opinion, which will be proved or
        > disproved in further testing, that the boots did not stop the water. I
        > say this because they felt soaked completely through in less than 2
        > hours of use in the rain.

        Edit: While this is your call to make, my experience is that even waterproof boots get soaked very quickly when water is not prevented from entering via the top. A quick check might be to put the shoes on and stand in the shower stall or bathtub with them with only a couple of inches of water. If your socks are still dry afterwards, it was probably just the rain.

        > Summary
        >
        > These boots are advertised as a crossover boot, between a fastpacker
        > boot and a true mid-weight hiking boot. I have to say, that is a very
        > fair representation of their capabilities.
        >
        > These boots are terrific for day hiking or light duty backpacking. They
        > are fine on forest trails that are not particularly rocky if the user is
        > not carrying a heavy load. However, on a rocky trail, they do not, to
        > my mind, provide the level of stiffness and protection in the soles that
        > I personally prefer.
        >
        > They did not seem to be waterproof, though this will be tested more
        > thoroughly in my Long Term Report.

        Comment: See my remark erlier.

        <snip>

        Nice report, Tim. Please take a look at the above before uploading. Oh, and - nice pictures!

        Regards,

        André
        Breezy Editor
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