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LTR - Princeton Tec Genesis Flashlight - John Waters

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  • exec@bysky.com
    James, Below is the text for my Princeton Tec Genesis Flashlight. The HTML can be seen in the test folder at:
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 3, 2009
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      James,

      Below is the text for my Princeton Tec Genesis Flashlight. The HTML can be
      seen in the test folder at:
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/LTR-Princeton%20Tec%20Genesis%20-%20John%20Waters/#LRPT
      or http://tinyurl.com/ch7ezu

      Thanks for working with me on this test. I will be leaving for a 3 day OOP
      in about 30 minutes, so no rush on this edit.

      John R. Waters
      _______________________________

      LONG-TERM REPORT

      LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS
      During the final testing phase the Genesis was used almost every day while
      walking the ranch here in Colorado as well as on hikes at night, including a
      3 mi (5 km) snowshoe trek at about 9,200 ft (2,800 m) above sea level (all
      of this was at night - otherwise it wouldn't be worth mentioning when
      testing a flashlight).
      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
      I have used the same set of Sanyo CR123A batteries that came with the unit.
      They still project a useable light about 15 ft (5 m) to 20 ft (6 m) down the
      trail. In fact, I was just outside a few minutes before I started writing
      this part of the report. Since keeping exact track of time used is difficult
      in the field, my estimate is that the light has been on for well over 15
      hours. I have seen no sharp decrease is light output. I can see the light
      getting less bright over time, but I saw no sharp decrease, just a gradual
      decrease and the decline was not noticeable until usage passed 10 hours or
      so.

      I like the push button on/off switch on the back of the unit because it
      enables me to use the light momentarily to save on battery life. When
      walking down a moonlit trail or searching for items in the tent I can just
      push the button to turn the light on for a few seconds and lift my thumb off
      to turn it off. My dog has learned to like it on his night walks, too. I
      flash the light each time he barks and he thinks he's turning the light on
      by barking so he keeps right at it. Kinda funny.

      I have new CR123A batteries that I bought on line. Yes, they are available
      at most local stores, but I purchased brand new 3 volt 1300 mAh batteries
      for $ 92 USD each. I was going to order a CR123 charger and a few
      rechargeables, but after doing some searching, I have not seen anything
      costing under $28 USD for a good smart charger (that won't overcharge the
      batteries) and two rechargeable CR123 batteries that are 650 mAH. If I can
      purchase 1300 mAh batteries for $1 USD each that will last for 15 hours or
      more, I think I'll use the disposable ones for the simplicity. It's not a
      "green" solution and maybe I'll change that opinion as I get more devices
      that use CR123 in my gear closet.

      "mAh" is milliamp hours, by the way. A higher mAh rating means a
      fully-charged battery can power a device that consumes more power for a
      longer amount of time before becoming depleted and needing to be re-charged.
      For example, a battery rated at 1500 mAh can power a device drawing 100
      milliamps for 15 hours, or a device drawing 150 milliamps for 10 hours. The
      Sanyo CR123A batteries that come with the Genesis are rated at 1400 mAh. So
      buying rechargeable CR123 batteries that only have 600 mAh capacity would
      reduce the LED on time to less than half. I would need to have more than 3
      sets of rechargeables to rotate them through to cover the same amount of
      time as the disposables. At least that's how I see it right now.

      This flashlight uses 3.0 volt CR123A batteries. There are 3.6 volt CR123
      batteries available and I will have to check with Princeton Tec before using
      3.6 volt batteries. I almost ordered the 3.6 volt batteries by mistake.

      I have not had any issues with the rear battery compartment O-ring coming
      off or breaking. The O-ring is really thin and it was a concern I had.
      However, I only removed the accessory ring a few times. Each time the
      accessory ring is removed it stresses the O-ring because it needs to pass
      over it. The O-ring stays in place well when just removing the battery
      compartment cover.

      I've dropped the unit in snow and took it from the warmth of my pocket out
      into 1 F (-17 C) temperatures with no issues and no fogging over of the
      lens. I've also dropped it on bedrock and was amazed that it kept right on
      working. I have dropped many flashlights in the same manner and the bulbs
      would pop and not work. The metal finish on the Genesis is like new. The
      rubber center moldings have slight markings probably made by fingernails or
      when hitting the ground when dropped or from being clipped on my belt.

      I have to admit that I still can't figure out how to easily and safely carry
      the colored lenses around without scratching them up or losing them. In most
      cases I would only want to bring one lens anyway (the red one). There was
      one night in a tent when I unscrewed the front lens holder and the clear
      lens fell off and rolled around and went under my legs somewhere. Good thing
      the Genesis still works with the lens holder off, because I needed the light
      to find the clear lens. Now I know the lens is not locked in place and can
      fall off as soon as the lens cover is removed.


      SUMMARY
      In all, this is a really neat flashlight. At 45 lumens brightness, this
      thing lights up hillsides (we call them hogbacks here in Colorado) several
      hundred feet/meters away with fully charged batteries. The batteries can
      last a long time, (up to 20 hours of light using 1400 mAh batteries) and the
      current control circuits provide constant light for a longer period as
      battery voltage is depleted, although the light will still get dimmer as the
      battery loses voltage. It's pretty hefty. It floats like a rock, but has
      waterproof integrity down to 3 ft (1 m) for up to 30 minutes. It is durable.
      It'll be in my pack for a long time.

      Thank you to Backpackgeartest.org and Princeton Tec for the opportunity to
      test this neat light.

      John R. Waters
    • jetriple@rockwellcollins.com
      ... be ... http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/LTR-Princeton%20Tec%20Genesis%20-%20John%20Waters/#LRPT ... OOP ... Hey John! Thanks for the
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 3, 2009
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        > James,
        >
        > Below is the text for my Princeton Tec Genesis Flashlight. The HTML can
        be
        > seen in the test folder at:
        >
        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/LTR-Princeton%20Tec%20Genesis%20-%20John%20Waters/#LRPT

        > or http://tinyurl.com/ch7ezu
        >
        > Thanks for working with me on this test. I will be leaving for a 3 day
        OOP
        > in about 30 minutes, so no rush on this edit.
        >
        > John R. Waters

        Hey John! Thanks for the report. Nothing big... so once you are back
        home you can see to the edits and upload your report. Remember to delete
        the one in the test folder.

        I look forward to working with you again!

        Best regards...

        James E. Triplett
        Princeton Tec Genesis Monitor

        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        I have seen no sharp decrease is light output.
        [EDIT] I believe "is" should be "in"

        Yes, they are available at most local stores, but I purchased brand new 3
        volt 1300 mAh batteries for $ 92 USD each.
        [EDIT] I'm easily confused? but you didn't really spend almost $100 on a
        battery, did you? My quick web survey shows them from 79 cents to $2.29,
        so I assume you mean $0.92. By the way, the dollar sign ($) and the "D"
        in "USD" mean the same thing, so choose one or the other. $0.92 US (my
        preference), or 0.92 USD (also acceptable).

        I have not seen anything costing under $28 USD for a good smart charger
        [EDIT] the dollar sign ($) and the "D" in "USD" mean the same thing, so
        choose one or the other.

        If I can purchase 1300 mAh batteries for $1 USD each that will last for 15
        hours or more, I think I'll use the disposable ones for the simplicity.
        [EDIT] the dollar sign ($) and the "D" in "USD" mean the same thing, so
        choose one or the other.

        At 45 lumens brightness, this thing lights up hillsides (we call them
        hogbacks here in Colorado) several hundred feet/meters away with fully
        charged batteries.
        [Comment] I'm not sure this needs to be changed, but "several hundred
        yards/meters" would be more technically accurate than "several hundred
        feet/meters", in my opinion.

        ++++++++++++++end++++++++++++++

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • exec@bysky.com
        James, Still waiting on my wife to finish up so we can get on the trail. So, I took care of this. Thanks for the very prompt edits and see you another time.
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 3, 2009
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          James,

          Still waiting on my wife to finish up so we can get on the trail. So, I
          took care of this. Thanks for the very prompt edits and see you another
          time.

          John

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <jetriple@...>
          To: <backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2009 9:32 AM
          Subject: [backpackgeartesters] [EDIT] LTR - Princeton Tec Genesis
          Flashlight - John Waters


          >> James,
          >>
          >> Below is the text for my Princeton Tec Genesis Flashlight. The HTML can
          > be
          >> seen in the test folder at:
          >>
          > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/LTR-Princeton%20Tec%20Genesis%20-%20John%20Waters/#LRPT
          >
          >> or http://tinyurl.com/ch7ezu
          >>
          >> Thanks for working with me on this test. I will be leaving for a 3 day
          > OOP
          >> in about 30 minutes, so no rush on this edit.
          >>
          >> John R. Waters
          >
          > Hey John! Thanks for the report. Nothing big... so once you are back
          > home you can see to the edits and upload your report. Remember to delete
          > the one in the test folder.
          >
          > I look forward to working with you again!
          >
          > Best regards...
          >
          > James E. Triplett
          > Princeton Tec Genesis Monitor
          >
          > +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
          > I have seen no sharp decrease is light output.
          > [EDIT] I believe "is" should be "in"
          >
          > Yes, they are available at most local stores, but I purchased brand new 3
          > volt 1300 mAh batteries for $ 92 USD each.
          > [EDIT] I'm easily confused? but you didn't really spend almost $100 on a
          > battery, did you? My quick web survey shows them from 79 cents to $2.29,
          > so I assume you mean $0.92. By the way, the dollar sign ($) and the "D"
          > in "USD" mean the same thing, so choose one or the other. $0.92 US (my
          > preference), or 0.92 USD (also acceptable).
          >
          > I have not seen anything costing under $28 USD for a good smart charger
          > [EDIT] the dollar sign ($) and the "D" in "USD" mean the same thing, so
          > choose one or the other.
          >
          > If I can purchase 1300 mAh batteries for $1 USD each that will last for 15
          > hours or more, I think I'll use the disposable ones for the simplicity.
          > [EDIT] the dollar sign ($) and the "D" in "USD" mean the same thing, so
          > choose one or the other.
          >
          > At 45 lumens brightness, this thing lights up hillsides (we call them
          > hogbacks here in Colorado) several hundred feet/meters away with fully
          > charged batteries.
          > [Comment] I'm not sure this needs to be changed, but "several hundred
          > yards/meters" would be more technically accurate than "several hundred
          > feet/meters", in my opinion.
          >
          > ++++++++++++++end++++++++++++++
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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