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LTR - Julbo Trail Sunglasses - Derek Hansen

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  • Derek Hansen
    Good evening! Thank you for editing; editors are awesome! ... Best, ~derek # # # LONG TERM REPORT 02 Feb 2009 FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS Just
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 2, 2009
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      Good evening!

      Thank you for editing; editors are awesome!

      > http://tinyurl.com/julbo-ltr

      Best,

      ~derek

      # # #

      LONG TERM REPORT
      02 Feb 2009
      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      <IMG>
      Just starting the Bull Run Occoquan Trail in Virginia.

      <IMG>
      Taking a photo break in the Pine Valley Mountain Wilderness.

      28 Nov 2008: Pohick Bay Regional Park, Virginia. Deciduous forest
      with pine and holly intermixed. Elevation 500 ft (152 m). Temperature
      was a reasonable 40 F (7 C) with slight wind. This was a 4-mile (6
      km) day hike with the family.

      27 Dec 2008: Pine Valley Mountain Wilderness, north of St. George,
      Utah. Clear and cold conditions with about two feet (61 cm) of snow
      on the ground. I was going to attempt an overnight camp, but I wasn't
      prepared for the deep snow (no snowshoes!), so this solo expedition
      (I was determined!) turned into a painful 6-mile (10 km) slog. The
      temperature hovered around 40 F (7 C) with a slight wind. The rough
      mountain landscape was punctuated with red cliff faces, juniper,
      pine, and cedar trees. Elevation was 4,500 ft (1,372 m).

      14 Jan 2009: Bull Run Occoquan Trail, Virginia. I had a lot of free
      time in January, so I hiked 14 miles (22.5 k) of the BROT from
      Fountainhead Regional Park. Elevation was from sea level to about 500
      ft (152 m). Deciduous forest with occasional pine and holly trees.
      This is a beautiful trail with lots of stream crossings and ample
      water. The trail was clear, which made hiking easy, but temperatures
      remained around 25 F (-4 C) during the hike with cooler wind gusts.

      31 Jan 2009: Centennial Trail, Flagstaff, Arizona. Trail running in
      the Coconino National Forest. Bristlecone Pine forest at 7000 ft
      (2134 m) with rocky elevations with patches of snow on the ground.
      The temperature was 16 F (-9 C) with dry air and bright, harsh sunlight.

      Including the above field locations, I have used the Julbo sunglasses
      almost daily in a variety of activities.

      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      The skies were partly cloudy during my family hike in Pohick Bay and
      so I often removed the glasses because they weren't really needed.
      Sometimes, even with the lowest tint setting, I like the amber color
      of the glasses and how the lenses enhances the scenery. However, on
      this hike, I simply preferred the glasses off. I normally wrap the
      glasses in a bandana to keep from scratching the lenses.

      During my trip to Utah, I was very grateful to have the glasses. The
      sunlight reflecting off the snow was blinding, but the glasses really
      helped. In fact, after I looked at the photos I took of myself after
      the trip, I was surprised at how dark the glasses turned. I don't
      think I really noticed them get that dark before, but I imagine with
      the higher elevation, brighter light, and UV radiation, the glasses
      were working overtime. The glasses really worked to cut down the
      glare, but I did notice some distortion as I glanced up to the top of
      the lenses. At first it was my peripheral vision playing tricks on
      me: I thought I saw birds ruffling branches, but I finally realized
      that the lenses were just bending the light a little causing a
      refraction. I had never noticed this before until this hike, but now
      I see this distortion often. It isn't terrible; it is only at the top
      portion of the lenses and mostly outside my regular field of vision.

      Back in Virginia on the Bull Run trail, I again noticed how dark the
      lenses turned. The trail was thicker with trees than in Utah, but the
      harsh light still made its way down. During this hike I had a
      balaclava around my head and neck and the sunglasses wrapped around
      the outside of the material. With the flexible lenses, I hardly
      noticed a change in pressure on my temples, and I had no worries that
      the glasses would stay on my head from previous experiences.

      Going trail running in Flagstaff, Arizona was a real treat, and I was
      again very grateful to have the Julbo Trail Sunglasses with me. The
      light was harsh but the glasses turned very dark and worked well. I
      was wearing a balaclava again, but this time my chin and mouth were
      often covered, sending breath moisture up into my glasses. This is
      one of the few times I noticed fogging in my glasses and I had to
      make some adjustments during my run to clear the steam off the
      lenses. Minor fogging wasn't a problem because the air circulation
      usually took care of it. However, when my balaclava was adjusted
      differently, sending moisture repeatedly onto the glasses, I had to
      wipe the lenses clean by hand.

      FINAL SUMMARY

      I love the Julbo Trail Sunglasses! They are light, flexible, and do a
      great job protecting my eyes from the sun. I think the glasses look
      good and I expect to use them often in the future.

      Roses
      1. Lightweight!
      2. Flexible, but tight enough to stay on my head
      3. Variable tint feature works well

      Thorns
      1. I was turned off by the large (and unattractive) head strap that
      came with the glasses. I never used them and I hope I never will. RIP.

      I would like to thank Julbo and BackpackGearTest.org for providing me
      with the opportunity to test this product.
    • AsABat
      Derek, Just a couple edits for you. Thanks! Bill Jeffrey Monitor ... Sometimes, even with the lowest tint setting, I like the amber color of the glasses and
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 5, 2009
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        Derek,

        Just a couple edits for you. Thanks!

        Bill Jeffrey
        Monitor

        -------------


        Sometimes, even with the lowest tint setting, I like the amber color
        of the glasses and how the lenses enhances the scenery.

        ###EDIT: enhance

        At first it was my peripheral vision playing tricks on me: I thought
        I saw birds ruffling branches, but I finally realized that the lenses
        were just bending the light a little causing a refraction.

        ###Edit: "causing refraction." (Without the "a" – since refraction is
        an action rather than a physical object, the article ("a") does not
        seem proper – or so my grammar checker and dictionary tell me)
      • Derek Hansen
        Thanks for the edits! I ve uploaded the edited version and removed the test. ~derek
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 6, 2009
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          Thanks for the edits!

          I've uploaded the edited version and removed the test.

          ~derek

          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, " AsABat" <wjj2001@...> wrote:

          > Just a couple edits for you. Thanks!
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