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TED FR Bask Trekking Sleeping Bag

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  • edwardripleyduggan
    Here s my Bask Trekking FR for editing. See the test folder at http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/TED%20Bask%20Trekking%20FR/ or
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 25, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Here's my Bask Trekking FR for editing. See the test folder at

      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/TED%20Bask%20Trekking%20FR/

      or

      http://tinyurl.com/9w3k2

      for the HTML version.

      Best,

      Ted.


      Field Report:
      BASK Trekking sleeping bag

      Report Date: July 26, 2005

      This is the second report of three
      The Initial Report may be viewed here.


      Navigation

      Reviewer Background
      Product information in brief
      Field and test information
      Product use and Performance
      Summary
      Future testing strategy




      Reviewer Background

      I enjoy walking in all its manifold forms, from a simple stroll in
      the woods to multi-day backpack excursions. Though by no means an
      extreme ultra-light enthusiast, from spring to fall my preference is
      to carry a pack weight (before food and water) of 12 lb (5.5 kg), more
      or less. In recent years, I've rapidly moved to a philosophy of
      "lighter is better," within the constraints of budget and common sense.




      Reviewer Information

      * Name: Edward Ripley-Duggan
      * Age: 51
      * Gender: Male
      * Height: 6′ 1″; (1.85 m)
      * Weight: 215 pounds (98 kg)
      * erd@...
      * Catskills, New York State



      Product information in brief

      Information as provided by manufacturer

      * Manufacturer: BASK Company, Ltd.
      * URL: http://www.baskcanada.com (North American
      distributor)
      * Product: Trekking Down Sleeping Bag
      * Year of manufacture: 2005
      * Size XL
      * MSRP: $299 Canadian (from website)
      * Manufacturer's stated weight: 1.4 kg/3.1 lb for XL
      (from website)
      * Manufacturer's stated length with hood: 235 cm/7.7 ft
      * Manufacturer's stated length to shoulder seam: 203
      cm/6.7 ft
      * Manufacturer's stated width at opening: 84 cm/2.8 ft
      * Manufacturer's stated width at foot: 55 cm/1.8 ft
      * Manufacturer's stated packed size: 23 cm/9.0 in
      diameter, 49 cm/19.3 in height (without compression)
      * Stated fill power: 650 +/- 5% (hang-tag)
      * Stated fill material: Goose down (grey), 85% down,
      15% feather
      * Stated fill treatment: Nikwax wash
      * Zip: left, YKK, two-way, mateable
      * Shell: Nylon Ripstop Tactel (Sofinal, Belgium), from
      tag and website
      * Outer Color: Black
      * Inner Color: Gray
      * Temperature rating (Comfort): +15/-5 C (60/23 F)
      from website
      * Temperature rating (Extreme): - 15 C (5 F) from website


      Information as observed

      * Measured weight of bag (analog scale): 1.45 kg/3.2 lb
      * Measured weight of compression sack: 124 gm/4 oz
      * Measured length with hood: 235 cm/7.7 ft
      * Measured length to shoulder seam: 203 cm/ 6.7 ft
      * Measured width at opening: 84 cm/2.8 ft (stretched
      tight)
      * Measured width at foot: 36 cm/1.2 ft (maximum
      footbox width)
      * Measured diameter in manufacturer's compression sack
      (uncompressed): 22.3 cm/9.0 in
      * Measured height in manufacturer's compression sack
      (uncompressed): 50 cm/19.7 in
      * Measured height in manufacturer's compression sack
      (compressed): 25 cm/ 10 in
      * Average loft (middle of bag), one hour after
      compression: 13 cm/5 in +
      * Drawstrings: Two, one at draft collar, one at
      perimeter of hood
      * Full-length draft collar, tape-stiffened zip
      * Full (circumferential) down collar



      Field and test information

      During the two months discussed in this Field Report, the daytime
      temperatures ranged from cool (50 F, 10 C) to scorchingly hot (by my
      standards) fairly frequently over 90 F (32 C), coupled with high
      humidity. Night temperature minimums ranged from moderate (45 F, 7 C)
      to extremely warm and humid. Indeed, this has so far been a warm, wet
      late spring and summer in my region. In June and July, I was only able
      to do a couple of backpacks for which the BASK bag was appropriate in
      terms of temperature rating, as even a 35 F (2 C) summer bag was a
      trifle too warm much of the time. Testing was done in the Catskill and
      Adirondack Mountains of New York State, at sites up to 2000 ft (600
      m). The terrain ranged up to 4500 ft (1400 m).

      Product use and Performance

      Sleeping arrangement

      I used the BASK bag within a silnylon tarptent outfitted with a
      bug mesh door and small beak (an older model Dancing Light Tarptent).
      For comfort, I slept on a tapered half-length pad (the Bozeman
      Mountain Works TorsoLite). I generally used no insulation under my
      legs, other than the groundsheet (silnylon or Tyvek) placed under the
      tent floor.

      Catskills, June backpack

      Temperatures during the day were high, and though it generally
      cooled down at night, the temperature in the tent appeared to run ten
      degrees over ambient. This meant that shortly after bedtime, the
      temperature in the tent was 60 F (16 C), based on a reading from my
      altimeter (which combines a thermometer etc.). In this warmth and
      humidity, all I could do initially was lie on the bag (comfortably
      enough, I should say). I'd chosen the BASK bag solely so I could test
      how well I fared at warmer temperatures. Sadly, the answer was "not
      very well." This was in no way the fault of the bag, but simply (and
      predictably) that it was far too heavy for the conditions. I'm neither
      a cold nor warm sleeper, generally speaking; pretty average, in fact.

      In the small hours of the morning, towards dawn, it did cool down
      a bit, and I opened the bag and lay in it with it unzipped for a
      while, but this (while comfortable) was hardly necessary. Usin this
      bag at these temperatures was not an exercise I would care to repeat.
      The conclusion that I drew from this was that the bag is likely to be
      only marginally useful to me in late spring and summer. If I had been
      bivvying in the open (not a pleasant prospect, given the bugs) my
      guess, based on my reaction at cooler morning temperatures, is that
      the bag would have been a lot more bearable!

      Adirondacks, July backpack

      This trip, to the Seward range, coincided with a period with
      bright, warm, dry days and clear nights, with a steep drop in
      temperature towards morning. Since I was further north and at higher
      elevation the bag was an appropriate choice. I was particularly and
      unusually fatigued and feeling rather sore, and due to a late return
      to camp, I'd not eaten very much (nor had I been hungry), so I was
      probably sleeping cooler than normal. While it was by no means cold in
      the tent, I was comfortable to slip into the unzipped bag, and by
      morning, I was cozily ensconced with the zip all the way up, though I
      didn't need or use the hood. Based on the weather reports for the
      region, the night low (outside the tent) was slightly over 40 F (4 C).

      I found the bag lining uncommonly comfortable, not something I'd
      really paid attention to on first use. It has a comfortable, sensually
      pleasing feel. I did experience a little balkiness with the zip, which
      seemed to snag a little, both when zipping the bag tight and when
      opening it in the morning, but this wasn't serious, and the problem
      may have been due to a degree of clumsiness. The draft tube over the
      zip is certainly very effective, as I could feel a substantial
      temperature differential if I lifted the draft tube and put my hand by
      the zip. I did not really deploy the draft collar or hood. These will
      have to wait for the autumn for testing. I was pleased to note that
      the bag repelled condensation, a moderate amount of which was
      deposited on the walls of the tent, extremely well.

      The fit of the bag seemed comfortable to me, not binding, but not
      extremely loose. It's probably slightly less confining than other bags
      I own, though not to a point that I'm overly concerned about excessive
      airspace within the bag. While not tubby, I should note that I'm not
      of especially slender build.

      General observations.

      Due to timing and weather, factors beyond my control, throughout
      the Field Test period I was examining only the upper temperature limit
      of the bag. This is important, as many backpackers own a single
      sleeping bag, and it's often one with a temperature rating in the 20 F
      (-7 C) range. The BASK bag functions acceptably as a summer bag for
      tent camping, although naturally not as well as a summer-rated bag or
      a simple cover.

      On this last point, I did rather wish that the bag could be fully
      opened and used in the manner of a quilt; however, past experience has
      shown me that a full zip decreases the effectiveness of a sleeping
      bag; no matter how good the draft-tube, stray wisps of cold air enter
      the foot box. I was pleased with the comfort of the bag. There were no
      projecting feathers poking me, the lining was soft and comfortable,
      and the down seems to have less odor than on some high-end sleeping
      bags I own (not that I mind, within reason, the odor of down).

      Summary

      While I haven't been able to give the bag anything approaching the
      thorough workout it will receive by the time of the Long Term Report,
      it has proved an acceptable choice for nighttime tent temperatures
      around 50 F (10 C), although I find it uncomfortable at anything
      greatly in excess of that. The bag seems adequately water resistant,
      down-fast and unusually tactilely comfortable. My only (minor) concern
      to date is for the smoothness of operation of the zip.

      Future testing Strategy

      In the four months to come, and especially as the nighttime
      temperatures start to fall, I expect to use the BASK bag with
      regularity, as it nicely plugs a gap between summer-weight and winter
      bags.

      I will continue to examine those aspects of the bag outlined in
      the Initial Review, as well as any other matters that arise. Some of
      the questions posed in the IR are at least partially answered by my
      experiences to date, but I will be especially intrigued to test the
      low-temperature performance.

      I thank BackpackGearTest and The BASK Company, Ltd. for permitting
      me to participate in this very interesting test.
    • edwardripleyduggan
      A new and improved version of my Bask Trekking FR for editing. See the test folder at
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 26, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        A new and improved version of my Bask Trekking FR for editing. See the
        test folder at
        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/TED%20Bask%20Trekking%20FR/

        or

        http://tinyurl.com/9w3k2

        for the HTML version.

        Best,

        Ted.
        Field Report:
        BASK Trekking sleeping bag

        Report Date: July 26, 2005

        This is the second report of three
        The Initial Report may be viewed here.


        Navigation

        Reviewer Background
        Product information in brief
        Field and test information
        Product use and Performance
        Summary
        Future testing strategy




        Reviewer Background

        I enjoy walking in all its manifold forms, from a simple stroll in
        the woods to multi-day backpack excursions. Though by no means an
        extreme ultra-light enthusiast, from spring to fall my preference is
        to carry a pack weight (before food and water) of 12 lb (5.5 kg), more
        or less. In recent years, I've rapidly moved to a philosophy of
        "lighter is better," within the constraints of budget and common sense.




        Reviewer Information

        * Name: Edward Ripley-Duggan
        * Age: 51
        * Gender: Male
        * Height: 6′ 1″; (1.85 m)
        * Weight: 215 pounds (98 kg)
        * erd@...
        * Catskills, New York State



        Product information in brief

        Information as provided by manufacturer

        * Manufacturer: BASK Company, Ltd.
        * URL: http://www.baskcanada.com (North American
        distributor)
        * Product: Trekking Down Sleeping Bag
        * Year of manufacture: 2005
        * Size XL
        * MSRP: $299 Canadian (from website)
        * Manufacturer's stated weight: 1.4 kg/3.1 lb for XL
        (from website)
        * Manufacturer's stated length with hood: 235 cm/7.7 ft
        * Manufacturer's stated length to shoulder seam: 203
        cm/6.7 ft
        * Manufacturer's stated width at opening: 84 cm/2.8 ft
        * Manufacturer's stated width at foot: 55 cm/1.8 ft
        * Manufacturer's stated packed size: 23 cm/9.0 in
        diameter, 49 cm/19.3 in height (without compression)
        * Stated fill power: 650 +/- 5% (hang-tag)
        * Stated fill material: Goose down (grey), 85% down,
        15% feather
        * Stated fill treatment: Nikwax wash
        * Zip: left, YKK, two-way, mateable
        * Shell: Nylon Ripstop Tactel (Sofinal, Belgium), from
        tag and website
        * Outer Color: Black
        * Inner Color: Gray
        * Temperature rating (Comfort): +15/-5 C (60/23 F)
        from website
        * Temperature rating (Extreme): - 15 C (5 F) from website


        Information as observed

        * Measured weight of bag (analog scale): 1.45 kg/3.2 lb
        * Measured weight of compression sack: 124 gm/4 oz
        * Measured length with hood: 235 cm/7.7 ft
        * Measured length to shoulder seam: 203 cm/ 6.7 ft
        * Measured width at opening: 84 cm/2.8 ft (stretched
        tight)
        * Measured width at foot: 36 cm/1.2 ft (maximum
        footbox width)
        * Measured diameter in manufacturer's compression sack
        (uncompressed): 22.3 cm/9.0 in
        * Measured height in manufacturer's compression sack
        (uncompressed): 50 cm/19.7 in
        * Measured height in manufacturer's compression sack
        (compressed): 25 cm/ 10 in
        * Average loft (middle of bag), one hour after
        compression: 13 cm/5 in +
        * Drawstrings: Two, one at draft collar, one at
        perimeter of hood
        * Full-length draft collar, tape-stiffened zip
        * Full (circumferential) down collar



        Field and test information

        During the two months discussed in this Field Report, the daytime
        temperatures ranged from cool (50 F, 10 C) to scorchingly hot (by my
        standards). It was fairly frequently over 90 F (32 C), coupled with
        high humidity. Nighttime temperature minimums ranged from a moderate
        (45 F, 7 C) to rather hot and humid (70 F, 21 C and up). Indeed, so
        far this has been a warm and rather wet late spring/early summer in my
        region of the US. In June and July I was only able to do a couple of
        backpacks for which the BASK bag was appropriate in terms of
        temperature rating, as even my 35 F (2 C) bag proved a trifle too warm
        much of the time. Testing was done in both the Catskill and Adirondack
        Mountains of New York State, at sites up to 2000 ft (600 m) in
        elevation. The terrain ranged up to 4500 ft (1400 m).

        Product use and Performance

        Sleeping arrangement

        I used the BASK bag within a silnylon tarptent outfitted with a
        bug mesh door and small beak (an older model Dancing Light Brawny
        Tarptent, in specific). I slept on a tapered half-length pad (the
        Bozeman Mountain Works TorsoLite). I generally used no insulation
        under my legs, other than the groundsheet (silnylon or Tyvek) that was
        placed beneath the tent floor. I did not use clothing, other than
        briefs, as it was too warm to do so.

        Catskills, June backpack

        Temperatures during the day were high, and though it had generally
        cooled down by nightfall, the tent appeared to run perhaps ten degrees
        over ambient from my body heat. So shortly after bedtime, the
        temperature in the tent was about 70 F (21 C), based on a reading from
        my altimeter (which combines a handy thermometer etc.). In this warmth
        and humidity, all I could do initially was lie on the bag (comfortably
        enough, I should say). I'd chosen the BASK sleeping bag for this trip
        in order that I could test how well I fared at warmer temperatures.
        Sadly, the answer was "not very well." This was in no way the fault of
        the bag, but simply (and predictably) that it was far too heavily
        insulated for the conditions. For reference, I'm neither a cold nor
        warm sleeper, generally speaking; pretty average, in fact.

        In the small hours of the morning, towards dawn, it did cool down
        a bit, to perhaps 60 F (16 C) and I crept into the bag and lay there
        with the zipper open for a while, but this (while comfortable) was
        barely necessary, as I could have easily slipped a jacket on. Using
        this bag at these temperatures was not an exercise I would really care
        to repeat. The conclusion that I drew was that the bag is likely to be
        only marginally useful to me in late spring and summer. If I had been
        bivvying in the open (not a pleasant prospect, given the bugs) my
        guess, based on my reaction to the cooler early morning temperatures,
        is that the bag would have been a lot more comfortable.

        Adirondacks, July backpack

        This trip, to the Seward range, coincided with a period with
        bright, warm, dry days and clear nights, with a resultant steep drop
        in temperature towards morning. Since I was a bit further north and at
        higher elevation the bag turned out to be an appropriate choice. I was
        particularly and unusually fatigued and rather sore after hiking, and
        feeling a little sub-par. Also, due to a late return to camp, I'd not
        eaten very much (nor had I been especially hungry). As a consequence,
        I was probably sleeping cooler than normal. While it was by no means
        cold in the tent at bedtime, it was comfortable to slip into the bag,
        zipper partly open for cooling. By morning, I was cozily ensconced
        with the zip all the way up, though I didn't need or use the hood.
        Based on the weather reports for the region, the night low (outside
        the tent) was slightly over 40 F (4 C).

        I found the bag lining uncommonly comfortable, not something I'd
        really paid attention to on my first trip. It has a comfortable,
        sensually pleasing feel. I did experience a little balkiness with the
        zipper, which tended to snag a little, both when zipping the bag up
        around me and when opening it to emerge in the morning. This wasn't a
        serious jam, and the problem may have been partially due to a degree
        of clumsiness on my part. The draft tube over the zip is certainly
        very effective, as I could feel a substantial temperature differential
        when I lifted the tube and put my hand next to the zip. I did not
        really fully deploy the draft collar or hood. These will have to wait
        for the cooler, less humid weather of autumn for testing. I was
        pleased to note that the bag repelled condensation extremely well.
        There was a moderate amount deposited on the walls of the tent, and
        the bag collected (but did not apparently absorb) some of this.

        The fit of the bag seems excellent to me. It doesn't bind, but
        neither is it extremely loose. It's probably slightly less confining
        than some other bags I own, though not to a point where I'm overly
        concerned about excessive airspace within the bag (which can be an
        issue at lower temperatures, as this causes the bag to take longer to
        reach thermal equilibrium). While not tubby, I should note that I'm
        not by any means of especially slender build.

        General observations.

        Due to the timing of the test and the weather, factors beyond my
        control, throughout the Field Test period I was able only to examinine
        the upper temperature limits of the bag. This is an important aspect,
        as many backpackers own a single sleeping bag. This is often one with
        a temperature rating in the 20 F (-7 C) range, approximately the
        temperature that the manufacturer has indicated is the lower comfort
        level for the Trekking sleeping bag. Literature supplied by the firm
        resulting from European standards testing implies that the bag will
        facilitate survival at substantially lower temperatures, but this
        refers more to emergency than routine use. The BASK bag functions
        acceptably but not ideally as a summer bag for tent camping, certainly
        not as well as a summer-rated bag or a simple down cover.

        On this last point, I did rather wish that the bag could be fully
        opened and used in the manner of a quilt, which is frequently the most
        comfortable manner to cover up on summer nights. Still, past
        experience has taught me that a full zip (i.e. one extending round the
        foot of the bag) can be problematic in colder conditions. No matter
        how good the draft-tube, stray wisps of cold air always enter the foot
        box. So there's a trade-off involved here, which unfortunately only
        owning multiple bags solves: to have a full zipper, better summer
        performance but slightly reduced winter warmth; or a partial zipper,
        solid cold-weather comfort, but no way to use the bag as a quilt.

        I was pleased with the tactile comfort of the bag. There were no
        protruding feathers poking me, the lining was extremely soft and
        comfortable, and the down seems to have less odor than some high-end
        sleeping bags I own (not that I mind, within reason, the odor of down).

        Summary

        While I haven't been able to give the bag anything approaching the
        thorough workout it will receive by the time of the Long Term Report,
        it has proved an acceptable choice for nighttime temperatures up to 50
        F (10 C), although I find it somewhat uncomfortable at anything
        greatly in excess of that. The bag seems adequately water resistant,
        down-fast and unusually tactilely comfortable. My only (minor) concern
        to date is for the smoothness of operation of the zip.

        Future testing Strategy

        In the four months to come, especially as the nighttime
        temperatures start to fall, I expect to use the BASK bag with
        regularity, as it nicely plugs a gap between summer-weight and winter
        bags.

        I will continue to examine those aspects of the bag outlined in
        the Initial Review, as well as any other matters that arise. Some of
        the questions posed in the IR are at least partially answered by my
        experiences to date, but I will be especially intrigued to test the
        low-temperature performance.

        I thank BackpackGearTest and The BASK Company, Ltd. for permitting
        me to participate in this very interesting test.
      • Thomas Vickers
        Man, I missed this. I will be editing it later in teh day. Sorry about the delay. TV
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 30, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Man, I missed this.
          I will be editing it later in teh day. Sorry about the delay.

          TV
        • edwardripleyduggan
          Hi Tom, The edit s not yet (Mon AM) on the list. If you didn t get to it, no problemo, but I wanted to alert you in case something went awry with posting it.
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 1, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Tom,

            The edit's not yet (Mon AM) on the list. If you didn't get to it, no
            problemo, but I wanted to alert you in case something went awry with
            posting it.

            Ted.


            --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Vickers"
            <redroach@e...> wrote:
            > Man, I missed this.
            > I will be editing it later in teh day. Sorry about the delay.
            >
            > TV
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