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POST - IR Jetboil Helios - Richard Lyon

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  • richardglyon
    For my mystery monitor s editing pleasure. Looks like another powerhouse stove. HTML version is in the Tests folder at http://tinyurl.com/62ofwo Richard
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 3, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      For my mystery monitor's editing pleasure. Looks like another
      powerhouse stove. HTML version is in the Tests folder at
      http://tinyurl.com/62ofwo
      Richard

      JETBOIL HELIOS COOKING SYSTEM
      Test Report by Richard Lyon
      Initial Report: December 2, 2008
      Field Report: February 2009 (anticipated)
      INITIAL REPORT
      December 2, 2008
      Product Details
      Manufacturer: Jetboil, Inc.
      Website: www.jetboil.com The photographs in my Initial Report come
      from this website.
      Dimensions, listed and measured: 4.5 x 8.25 in (115 mm x 210 mm)
      inside diameter (packed). Measured dimensions of individual
      components stated below.
      Listed weight: 28 oz/793 g
      Measured weight: 28.6 oz/811 g without fuel canister; 35.4 oz/975 g
      with full 100 g (3.5 oz) fuel canister.
      Includes: Helios is a seven-piece set, as described below. It comes
      with printed instructions, in English, French, German, and Spanish;
      the instructions can be accessed at Jetboil's website.
      MSRP: $159.95 US
      Accessories and related product: Jetboil offers a compatible 3-liter
      FluxRing® pot (MSRP $59.95) for use with Helios. The Helios Guide
      System (MSRP $199.95) includes both 2- and 3-liter pots. As do most
      stove manufacturers, Jetboil recommends using only its own
      proprietary brand of propane-butane fuel (brand name "Jetpower") with
      its stoves. While this is ordinarily sold separately from the cooking
      system, Jetboil kindly provided a 100 g canister with my Helios.
      Warranty: One year limited warranty to the original purchaser, with
      proof of purchase required.
      Product Description and First Impressions
      It's not just a stove, it's a cooking system. Jetboil markets Helios
      as "the easiest to use, most efficient, high capacity system
      available for outdoor cooking." Range and capacity are Jetboil's
      main selling points. Jetboil's claims on its website that Helios has
      a "measured Useable Temperature Range" of -10 to 100 F (-23 to 38
      C). Jetboil also posts a sustainable boil time of three minutes for
      one liter, a 25% improvement over its next-larger system, which has a
      1.5 liter cooking pot.
      Helios has seven pieces. Six are used for cooking:
      • A 2-liter metal pot with built-in Flux Ring® heat exchanger
      affixed around the outside of the base. This pot has two orange,
      slightly curved, fold-out arms, each 5 in/13 cm in length, and a
      small ring on the side opposite the handles. All Jetboil cooking
      vessels have a neoprene cozy encircling the sides; Helios's is slate
      grey in color, with "JETBOIL" and the company's logo and web address
      printed on two sides. The inside of the pot is marked in half-liter
      increments. The pot is three inches (7 cm) deep and at 11.25 oz/319
      g is the heaviest component.
      • A flexible black plastic lid (2.12 oz/60 g) that snaps over
      the lip of the pot. This looks a bit like a small Frisbee, and
      Jetboil notes that the lid "makes a good `flying disc' for added fun
      around camp."
      • Helios burner with attached fuel line. The fuel line is 11
      in/28 cm (listed and measured) long, and at the canister end has a
      valve with fold-out handle for controlling the volume of gas into the
      burner, and also a fixed circular knob that slides into a groove on
      the fuel can stabilizer to allow liquid feed. The piezo igniter has
      a button starter in plastic housing that slides along the fuel line.
      This piece weighs 6.25 oz/177 g.
      • A copper-colored burner stand with three fold-out arms,
      weighing 3.4 oz/96 g. When folded out the arms support the pot,
      sitting just inside the heat exchanger ring.
      • A 0.9 oz/25 g black hard plastic fuel can stabilizer with
      folding legs. As noted, a groove on the center of this piece allows
      holding the canister in place with its valve on the bottom to permit
      a liquid feed into the fuel line. Each leg of the stabilizer has two
      grooves. A 100 g Jetpower canister's base fits firmly into the inner
      set of grooves, and a 225 g (7.8 oz) Primus canister similarly fits
      into the outer set. I believe that Jetpower fuel is also available
      in this larger size.
      • A clear flexible plastic windscreen, 2.7 in/7 cm wide and 31
      in/79 cm long when fully extended. This has a pair mating metal
      snaps at each end and three female snaps on short arms that extend
      into the center and affix to male snaps on the burner base. The
      windscreen weighs 2.6 oz/74 g.
      The seventh piece is a bright orange plastic cover for the bottom of
      the unit when it is stored. This has two tabs and doubles as a
      dinner plate. It weighs 2.1 oz/60 g.
      Self-contained. By using the snap-on plate and pot lid Helios is
      entirely self-contained, not requiring a separate piece for storage –
      another Jetboil trait. With the burner detached from its stand all
      components and a 100 g Jetpower canister nest neatly inside the pot
      for storage, with ample room for my closed-up Jetset utensils (see my
      separate Owner Review). The plastic cover/plate protects the heat
      exchanger from scratches or dents during storage. The pot lid snaps
      over the lip of the pot firmly enough so that when I inverted the pot
      with the rest of the system inside nothing fell out.
      Easy to Assemble. The box includes easy-to-read directions, and set-
      up is intuitive. Remove the lid and plate from the pot; attach the
      burner to its stand by slipping two tabs over the inside of the base,
      being sure that a small arm on the burner fits into a notch on the
      stand; fold out the three arms on the burner base; fold out the
      stabilizer legs; screw a canister into the fuel line and set on the
      stabilizer (either "upside down," with the flat valve of the canister
      on the bottom, or with the canisters base inside the grooves on the
      stabilizer); flex the windscreen around the burner base and snap its
      ends together and its arms to the burner base; and place the pot atop
      the arms of the base (after igniting). When attached to the base the
      windscreen sits about one-half inch (~1 cm) above the ground,
      allowing the fuel line to fit underneath.
      Why "Jet" is part of its name. For my Helios's maiden voyage, in my
      side yard, I used a half-full 100 g can of Jetpower I had on hand. I
      turned the valve to full "On" position, hit the piezo button, and
      Pow! a fierce and noisy flame 5 inches (13 cm) in the air. I really
      was reminded of an airplane ignition. At 50 F/10 C, about 200 ft/60
      m above sea level, with gusty winds, it took 2 minutes 55 seconds for
      one liter, uncovered, to reach a rolling boil. Immediately I swapped
      out the Jetpower can for a larger can of Primus fuel, turned the
      valve, hit the piezo, and achieved the same results with a fresh
      liter of cold tap water. Both of these tests were done with a liquid
      feed. Since the button on the underside of the fuel line valve, not
      the canister itself, slides into the stabilizer's groove, any size
      canister with a Lindal valve may be used in this mode. As noted the
      larger Primus canister fits into the outer grooves on the stabilizer
      legs for a "standard" application.
      I had only one minor problem in these trials. It is slightly
      difficult to turn the fuel line valve off completely; I had to lift
      the canister and fuel line to get it fully closed.
      Limitations on use. In addition to standard warnings about carbon
      dioxide, never using indoors, keeping fuel canisters away from heat,
      and the like, the instructions provide guidance to avoid several
      possible misapplications:
      • Set the pot lid upside down over the pot when cooking, rather
      than snapping it on, to avoid upsetting the pot when removing the
      lid. (This is good advice. As noted the lid fits tightly when
      snapped on and it might be difficult and mildly dangerous to try to
      force it off a hot pot.)
      • Always use the burner base's pot supports; never set a pot
      directly on the burner.
      • Extend the pot handles when cooking or they will become too
      hot to handle.
      • Use only low settings when the pot is near capacity, to avoid
      the contents' boiling over. (This prompts a test criterion: what is
      the pot's usable capacity?)
      • While other makers' "normal, flat-bottomed cookware" may be
      used on the burner unit, Helios is not compatible with Jetboil's Fry
      Pan (nuts!), GCS 1.5 liter cooking pot, or PCS cooking cup, each of
      which has a smaller diameter heat exchanger on its base.
      • Use the windscreen only with a Helios pot. This warning is
      also printed on the windscreen. (I'm not quite sure why this is so
      but I shall do as I have been told.)
      Fit in my pack. Helios isn't a small system but I had no trouble
      fitting it into the three packs I use most often in winter: my
      Mystery Ranch BDSB expedition pack, my R2 custom pack, and my Mystery
      Ranch Mountain Monkey day pack. (Each of these is separately
      reviewed if the reader cares to check their dimensions.)
      I'm a Jetboil junkie, an addiction that's changed my backcountry
      cooking for the better. Since buying my Jetboil PCS in 2004 I have
      progressed from strictly just-add-boiling-water meals to occasional
      multi-course meals cooked from scratch. I'm looking forward to
      testing Helios, the company's newest product, this winter.
      My Initial Report ends here. Check back in early February for my
      Field Report, in which I'll describe my results from the backcountry
      and give my opinions after two months' use. My thanks to
      BackpackGearTest.org and Jetboil for the opportunity to test this
      impressive cooking system.
    • Leesa J
      Richard, Looks like you forgot the section about the tester, lol. Leesa ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 3, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Richard,

        Looks like you forgot the section about the tester, lol.

        Leesa

        On Wed, Dec 3, 2008 at 9:54 AM, richardglyon <rlyon@...> wrote:

        > For my mystery monitor's editing pleasure. Looks like another
        > powerhouse stove. HTML version is in the Tests folder at
        > http://tinyurl.com/62ofwo
        > Richard
        >
        > JETBOIL HELIOS COOKING SYSTEM
        > Test Report by Richard Lyon
        > Initial Report: December 2, 2008
        > Field Report: February 2009 (anticipated)
        > INITIAL REPORT
        > December 2, 2008
        > Product Details
        > Manufacturer: Jetboil, Inc.
        > Website: www.jetboil.com The photographs in my Initial Report come
        > from this website.
        > Dimensions, listed and measured: 4.5 x 8.25 in (115 mm x 210 mm)
        > inside diameter (packed). Measured dimensions of individual
        > components stated below.
        > Listed weight: 28 oz/793 g
        > Measured weight: 28.6 oz/811 g without fuel canister; 35.4 oz/975 g
        > with full 100 g (3.5 oz) fuel canister.
        > Includes: Helios is a seven-piece set, as described below. It comes
        > with printed instructions, in English, French, German, and Spanish;
        > the instructions can be accessed at Jetboil's website.
        > MSRP: $159.95 US
        > Accessories and related product: Jetboil offers a compatible 3-liter
        > FluxRing(R) pot (MSRP $59.95) for use with Helios. The Helios Guide
        > System (MSRP $199.95) includes both 2- and 3-liter pots. As do most
        > stove manufacturers, Jetboil recommends using only its own
        > proprietary brand of propane-butane fuel (brand name "Jetpower") with
        > its stoves. While this is ordinarily sold separately from the cooking
        > system, Jetboil kindly provided a 100 g canister with my Helios.
        > Warranty: One year limited warranty to the original purchaser, with
        > proof of purchase required.
        > Product Description and First Impressions
        > It's not just a stove, it's a cooking system. Jetboil markets Helios
        > as "the easiest to use, most efficient, high capacity system
        > available for outdoor cooking." Range and capacity are Jetboil's
        > main selling points. Jetboil's claims on its website that Helios has
        > a "measured Useable Temperature Range" of -10 to 100 F (-23 to 38
        > C). Jetboil also posts a sustainable boil time of three minutes for
        > one liter, a 25% improvement over its next-larger system, which has a
        > 1.5 liter cooking pot.
        > Helios has seven pieces. Six are used for cooking:
        > � A 2-liter metal pot with built-in Flux Ring(R) heat exchanger
        > affixed around the outside of the base. This pot has two orange,
        > slightly curved, fold-out arms, each 5 in/13 cm in length, and a
        > small ring on the side opposite the handles. All Jetboil cooking
        > vessels have a neoprene cozy encircling the sides; Helios's is slate
        > grey in color, with "JETBOIL" and the company's logo and web address
        > printed on two sides. The inside of the pot is marked in half-liter
        > increments. The pot is three inches (7 cm) deep and at 11.25 oz/319
        > g is the heaviest component.
        > � A flexible black plastic lid (2.12 oz/60 g) that snaps over
        > the lip of the pot. This looks a bit like a small Frisbee, and
        > Jetboil notes that the lid "makes a good `flying disc' for added fun
        > around camp."
        > � Helios burner with attached fuel line. The fuel line is 11
        > in/28 cm (listed and measured) long, and at the canister end has a
        > valve with fold-out handle for controlling the volume of gas into the
        > burner, and also a fixed circular knob that slides into a groove on
        > the fuel can stabilizer to allow liquid feed. The piezo igniter has
        > a button starter in plastic housing that slides along the fuel line.
        > This piece weighs 6.25 oz/177 g.
        > � A copper-colored burner stand with three fold-out arms,
        > weighing 3.4 oz/96 g. When folded out the arms support the pot,
        > sitting just inside the heat exchanger ring.
        > � A 0.9 oz/25 g black hard plastic fuel can stabilizer with
        > folding legs. As noted, a groove on the center of this piece allows
        > holding the canister in place with its valve on the bottom to permit
        > a liquid feed into the fuel line. Each leg of the stabilizer has two
        > grooves. A 100 g Jetpower canister's base fits firmly into the inner
        > set of grooves, and a 225 g (7.8 oz) Primus canister similarly fits
        > into the outer set. I believe that Jetpower fuel is also available
        > in this larger size.
        > � A clear flexible plastic windscreen, 2.7 in/7 cm wide and 31
        > in/79 cm long when fully extended. This has a pair mating metal
        > snaps at each end and three female snaps on short arms that extend
        > into the center and affix to male snaps on the burner base. The
        > windscreen weighs 2.6 oz/74 g.
        > The seventh piece is a bright orange plastic cover for the bottom of
        > the unit when it is stored. This has two tabs and doubles as a
        > dinner plate. It weighs 2.1 oz/60 g.
        > Self-contained. By using the snap-on plate and pot lid Helios is
        > entirely self-contained, not requiring a separate piece for storage �
        > another Jetboil trait. With the burner detached from its stand all
        > components and a 100 g Jetpower canister nest neatly inside the pot
        > for storage, with ample room for my closed-up Jetset utensils (see my
        > separate Owner Review). The plastic cover/plate protects the heat
        > exchanger from scratches or dents during storage. The pot lid snaps
        > over the lip of the pot firmly enough so that when I inverted the pot
        > with the rest of the system inside nothing fell out.
        > Easy to Assemble. The box includes easy-to-read directions, and set-
        > up is intuitive. Remove the lid and plate from the pot; attach the
        > burner to its stand by slipping two tabs over the inside of the base,
        > being sure that a small arm on the burner fits into a notch on the
        > stand; fold out the three arms on the burner base; fold out the
        > stabilizer legs; screw a canister into the fuel line and set on the
        > stabilizer (either "upside down," with the flat valve of the canister
        > on the bottom, or with the canisters base inside the grooves on the
        > stabilizer); flex the windscreen around the burner base and snap its
        > ends together and its arms to the burner base; and place the pot atop
        > the arms of the base (after igniting). When attached to the base the
        > windscreen sits about one-half inch (~1 cm) above the ground,
        > allowing the fuel line to fit underneath.
        > Why "Jet" is part of its name. For my Helios's maiden voyage, in my
        > side yard, I used a half-full 100 g can of Jetpower I had on hand. I
        > turned the valve to full "On" position, hit the piezo button, and
        > Pow! a fierce and noisy flame 5 inches (13 cm) in the air. I really
        > was reminded of an airplane ignition. At 50 F/10 C, about 200 ft/60
        > m above sea level, with gusty winds, it took 2 minutes 55 seconds for
        > one liter, uncovered, to reach a rolling boil. Immediately I swapped
        > out the Jetpower can for a larger can of Primus fuel, turned the
        > valve, hit the piezo, and achieved the same results with a fresh
        > liter of cold tap water. Both of these tests were done with a liquid
        > feed. Since the button on the underside of the fuel line valve, not
        > the canister itself, slides into the stabilizer's groove, any size
        > canister with a Lindal valve may be used in this mode. As noted the
        > larger Primus canister fits into the outer grooves on the stabilizer
        > legs for a "standard" application.
        > I had only one minor problem in these trials. It is slightly
        > difficult to turn the fuel line valve off completely; I had to lift
        > the canister and fuel line to get it fully closed.
        > Limitations on use. In addition to standard warnings about carbon
        > dioxide, never using indoors, keeping fuel canisters away from heat,
        > and the like, the instructions provide guidance to avoid several
        > possible misapplications:
        > � Set the pot lid upside down over the pot when cooking, rather
        > than snapping it on, to avoid upsetting the pot when removing the
        > lid. (This is good advice. As noted the lid fits tightly when
        > snapped on and it might be difficult and mildly dangerous to try to
        > force it off a hot pot.)
        > � Always use the burner base's pot supports; never set a pot
        > directly on the burner.
        > � Extend the pot handles when cooking or they will become too
        > hot to handle.
        > � Use only low settings when the pot is near capacity, to avoid
        > the contents' boiling over. (This prompts a test criterion: what is
        > the pot's usable capacity?)
        > � While other makers' "normal, flat-bottomed cookware" may be
        > used on the burner unit, Helios is not compatible with Jetboil's Fry
        > Pan (nuts!), GCS 1.5 liter cooking pot, or PCS cooking cup, each of
        > which has a smaller diameter heat exchanger on its base.
        > � Use the windscreen only with a Helios pot. This warning is
        > also printed on the windscreen. (I'm not quite sure why this is so
        > but I shall do as I have been told.)
        > Fit in my pack. Helios isn't a small system but I had no trouble
        > fitting it into the three packs I use most often in winter: my
        > Mystery Ranch BDSB expedition pack, my R2 custom pack, and my Mystery
        > Ranch Mountain Monkey day pack. (Each of these is separately
        > reviewed if the reader cares to check their dimensions.)
        > I'm a Jetboil junkie, an addiction that's changed my backcountry
        > cooking for the better. Since buying my Jetboil PCS in 2004 I have
        > progressed from strictly just-add-boiling-water meals to occasional
        > multi-course meals cooked from scratch. I'm looking forward to
        > testing Helios, the company's newest product, this winter.
        > My Initial Report ends here. Check back in early February for my
        > Field Report, in which I'll describe my results from the backcountry
        > and give my opinions after two months' use. My thanks to
        > BackpackGearTest.org and Jetboil for the opportunity to test this
        > impressive cooking system.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • richardglyon
        Leesa, bad things happen when you get old. Will try to fix later today. Richard
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 3, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Leesa, bad things happen when you get old. Will try to fix later today.
          Richard

          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Leesa J" <leesaj@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Richard,
          >
          > Looks like you forgot the section about the tester, lol.
          >
          > Leesa
          >
          >
        • Leesa J
          Tell me about it... I forget so many things, that I just tell people up front - I will forget that, better email me . LOL Oh well, some things are better
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 3, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Tell me about it... I forget so many things, that I just tell people up
            front - 'I will forget that, better email me'. LOL Oh well, some things
            are better forgotten anyway,

            Leesa

            On Wed, Dec 3, 2008 at 2:17 PM, richardglyon <rlyon@...> wrote:

            > Leesa, bad things happen when you get old. Will try to fix later today.
            > Richard
            >
            > --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Leesa J" <leesaj@...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Richard,
            > >
            > > Looks like you forgot the section about the tester, lol.
            > >
            > > Leesa
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • nazdarovye
            Thanks, Richard. I believe I m your mystery monitor and I ll look forward to the updated version... - Steve
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 3, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks, Richard. I believe I'm your "mystery monitor" and I'll look
              forward to the updated version...

              - Steve


              --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "richardglyon" <rlyon@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Leesa, bad things happen when you get old. Will try to fix later today.
              > Richard
              >
              > --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Leesa J" <leesaj@>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > Richard,
              > >
              > > Looks like you forgot the section about the tester, lol.
              > >
              > > Leesa
              > >
              > >
              >
            • richardglyon
              Steve, I ve been working on it, so far without success. Despite best efforts from BGTWeb I can t get pictures uploaded. I may post using Report Writer and
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 4, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Steve, I've been working on it, so far without success. Despite best
                efforts from BGTWeb I can't get pictures uploaded. I may post using
                Report Writer and substitute later. By the way, your Flickr slide show
                was marvelous - keep posting them, please. Richard

                --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "nazdarovye"
                <nazdarovye@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks, Richard. I believe I'm your "mystery monitor" and I'll look
                > forward to the updated version...
                >
                > - Steve
                >
                >
                >
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