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IR - Gerber Omnivore - Rick

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  • Rick Allnutt
    Very nice light. I love the use of multiple battery types. Rick *************** Html here:
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 1, 2008
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      Very nice light. I love the use of multiple battery types.

      Rick

      ***************

      Html here:

      <http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Allnutt%20-%20Gerber%20Omnivore/>

      And the text version is here:

      Gerber Omnivore Flashlight
      Test Series by Rick Allnutt

      Initial Report - 1 October 2008

      Field Report - Come back in December 2008 for the next update

      Long Term Report - Come back in February 2009 for the final update

      TESTER INFORMATION
      NAME: Rick Allnutt
      EMAIL: rick@...
      AGE: 55
      LOCATION: Helotes, Texas
      GENDER: male
      HEIGHT: 6' 0" (1.8 m)
      WEIGHT: 190 lb (86 kg)

      Over the last several years, I have become an ultralight camper with a
      three-season base pack weight of about 8 lb (3.5 kg) and skin out weight
      of 17 lb (8 kg). I have completed many section hikes on the Appalachian
      Trail (AT) in all four seasons, and many trips to state parks, with a
      total mileage of about 1650 miles (2500 km). I am a gearhead, a hammock
      or tarp camper, and I make much of my own equipment.

      Trail Name: Risk

      Risk's Ultralite Hiking Page: www.imrisk.com

      INITIAL REPORT
      1 October 2008

      PRODUCT INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS

      Manufacturer: Gerber Legendary Blades
      Year of Manufacture: 2008
      Manufacturer's Website: http://www.gerbergear.com
      MSRP: Not Available
      Listed Weight: Not Available
      Measured Weight: 3.1 oz (88 g) with batteries
      3.9 oz (111 g) with AA battery
      3.5 oz (99 g) with AAA battery
      3.7 oz (105 g) with CR123 battery

      The Omnivore flashlight is a bright LED light designed to work with
      several battery types. When I opened the package, the light felt and
      worked just like I thought a flashlight should. But when I opened the
      light to put a battery in, I was in for a surprise.

      INITIAL IMPRESSIONS
      The Omnivore has a cute and meaningful name. One definition I found of
      omnivore was "one that takes in anything available. And that is just
      about what this flashlight does. I have a tendency to collect batteries
      in my kitchen closet. My headlamp uses three AAA batteries, but they
      only come sold as pairs. AA batteries show up the same way. Something
      needs one and its package mate goes in the closet. Recently, I have
      bought or acquired two devices that use CR123 batteries. The promise
      that this flashlight would use any of these cells was intriguing.

      For one thing, the CR123 battery is a 3 volt cell, while the AA and AAA
      batteries are 1.5 volt cells. That was going to be interesting seeing
      how the light can do all that. For another thing, all these batteries
      are different sizes.

      The flashlight has a single 0.7 watt LED which is focused into a beam by
      a non-adjustable lens. The body of the flashlight is aluminum and has an
      anodized black matte finish. The back end of the flashlight has a hole
      to tie a lanyard (no lanyard was provided) and a pushbutton switch. The
      button can be pushed in halfway to give an intermittent beam of light
      (push and I get light, release and light goes out). When the button is
      pushed in all the way, there is a very quiet click and the light stays
      on until the button is pushed again. There is a considerable difference
      between the distance needed to get intermittent and continuous light.

      To open the battery compartment, I unscrewed the front of the light
      which comes off like many other aluminum flashlights. There is an O-ring
      near the threads that is apparently designed to make the light water
      resistant. Looking down into the body of the light, there is a unique
      stair step design of the battery compartment. Without any inserts or
      devices, I found that I could drop any of the three battery types into
      the compartment. There is a place for any one of them. Only the AAA
      battery needs to be put in visually, to make sure that it is on the
      right step. The other two battery types can go no where except to their
      assigned stations.

      The battery life listed on the package materials varies by battery type.
      It is 4 hours for a AAA, 5.5 hours for a AA, and 5 hours for a CR123.
      This is not the hundreds of hours that a head lamp provides, but the
      Omnivore is a much brighter light that projects a beam much further than
      a head lamp does. The brightness of the light also differs depending on
      the batttery. With a AAA battery it gives 10 lumens and 140 LUX. The AA
      gives 12 lumens and 140 LUX. With 3 volts available, the CR123 puts out
      18 lumens and 210 LUX. Gerber rates the flashlight for a beam of 150 ft
      (46 m) with the AAA or AA batteries and 190 ft (60 m) with the CR123
      battery.

      SUMMARY

      The Gerber Omnivore flashlight is a bright light in a tough case. It has
      a unique battery compartment that allows the use of three different
      battery types. It uses batteries much more quickly than some LED lights,
      but it is handy for a bright white light to see into the far distance.

      The things I really like about this light are:
      - Uses several battery types that collect in my junk drawer
      - Appears to be built very strongly

      I thank Gerber and BackpackGearTest.org for selecting me for this test.
      Please come back in a couple months to see how the Omnivore flashlight
      has worked in the field.
    • jetriple@rockwellcollins.com
      ... ... Hey Rick! Cool light! Here are your edits on the Gerber Omnivore
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2008
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        >
        <http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Allnutt%20-%20Gerber%20Omnivore/>
        > Gerber Omnivore Flashlight
        > Test Series by Rick Allnutt

        Hey Rick! Cool light!

        Here are your edits on the Gerber Omnivore LED Flashlight. Nothing big,
        just a few misses... and a few questions from me. Nicly done! Especially
        considering the fairly worthless web information.

        James E. Triplett
        Gerber Omnivore Monitor
        +++++++++

        Manufacturer: Gerber Legendary Blades
        [Comment] The contact information on the site has the following:
        GerberGear
        14200 SW 72nd Avenue
        Portland, OR 97224
        So I'm not sure where "Gerber Legendary Blades" came from for the
        manufacturer's name.

        MSRP: Not Available
        [Comment] The website has $$ which when you click on it means a range of
        $25 - $60. Considering this large range you were probably correct to not
        include it, but I thought I'd point it out in case you missed it. (And it
        appears to be in the middle of the range at $40, but that's from
        retailers, so it doesn't count.)

        Measured Weight: 3.1 oz (88 g) with batteries
        [EDIT] I believe this first weight is withOUT batteries, correct?

        But when I opened the light to put a battery in, I was in for a surprise.
        [Comment] Intuitively, I can figure out what the surprise was, but I
        expected the next section to explain it. You never really do define the
        surprise (at least not as a "surprise") which kind of left me hanging.

        The Omnivore has a cute and meaningful name. One definition I found of
        omnivore was "one that takes in anything available.
        [EDIT] Missing an end quote.

        The brightness of the light also differs depending on the batttery.
        [EDIT] ttt should be tt in batttery.

        +++end+++


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