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LTR - Terra Nova Laser Competition Tent - Tom C.

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  • tcallahanbgt
    Below is my LTR for the Terra Nova Laser Competition Tent. The html version may be found here, http://tinyurl.com/4avu8m. TERRA NOVA LASER COMPETITION TENT
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 22, 2008
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      Below is my LTR for the Terra Nova Laser Competition Tent. The html
      version may be found here, http://tinyurl.com/4avu8m.

      TERRA NOVA LASER COMPETITION TENT
      TEST SERIES BY TOM CALLAHAN
      LTR
      September 22, 2008


      LONG-TERM REPORT

      LONG-TERM TEST LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      I camped out with the Laser Competition tent on 3 outings, for 4
      addition nights during the long term testing period. All trips were
      in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state. For all these trips I
      had sunny days and clear nights with relative humidity < 50%. So
      while this was very fortunate as far as back packing goes, it was not
      great for testing purposes as I was never able to really check out
      the tent's ability to handle rainy weather.

      The first trip during this phase of testing was an overnight trip in
      the central Cascades, camping at 4,700 ft (1,450 m). Day time
      temperatures ranged from 60 to 80 F (16 to 27 C). At night
      temperatures got down to around 50 F (10 C) and there was a light
      breeze.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Tent in Central Cascades" IMAGE
      CAPTION = "Tent in Central Cascades">>
      My second trip was into the central Cascades again, this time for a 2
      night outing, camping at 5,000 ft (1,500 m). Day time temperatures
      ranged from 65 to 80 F (18 to 27 C). Night time temperatures were
      around 40 F (4 C). This first night winds were calm and the second
      night they got up to around 15 mph (24 km/hr) at times.

      The third trip was an overnight in the North Cascades National Park.
      I camped up at 5,800 ft (1,800 m). Day time temperatures only reached
      65 F (18 C) and at night it dipped down to around 35 F (2 C). There
      was a light breezed that evening, just enough to rattle the rain fly.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "In Norht Cascades Nat'l Park" IMAGE
      CAPTION = "In North Cascades Nat'l Park">>


      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD

      This tent performed extremely well during this phase of the testing.
      The tent materials all held up well. I did not have any issue with
      the nylon stretching, all seams and peg loops stayed in tact. The
      tent pole, tent pegs and guy lines all functioned properly.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Twig toggle holding up rain fly"
      IMAGE CAPTION = "Twig toggle holding up rain fly">>
      As I used the tent during this testing phase I became more familiar
      with it. I learned that I would get good ventilation from pulling up
      the ends of the rain fly and holding them in place with the twig
      toggle described in the Long Term Report section. If the winds were
      really light, or the air not moving much at all I would unzip the
      vertical zipper on the rain fly. This would provide sufficient air
      flow such that I never over heated in this tent. I should note, I
      always fully zipped up the tent door on these outings, one for
      testing purposes and, two, just to keep the bugs out of my tent. So
      the concern I voiced in my Field Report, that I could not adjust the
      end ventilation from inside the tent, was not really an issue for me.
      Now I was careful to orient my tent in the proper direction to take
      advantage of the predominant breeze, especially when there was not
      much air moving. This always seemed to work well and I slept at a
      comfortable temperature at night.

      The pole hood became less of an issue for me the more I used the
      tent. I continued with the practice of just leaving the pole hood in
      place, attached to the tent. When I took down the tent the pole
      slipped out easily, past the pole hood loops. And likewise when I put
      the tent up, the tent pole just went though the pole sleeve and slid
      past the pole hood attachment points. Also, I got to thinking that
      since the rain fly stays attached to the tent, this really helps for
      make for a quick and easy set up. So much so, that the extra effort
      required to attach the pole hood is not much more work than having to
      put a rain fly on a tent as its own separate step, which is the case
      with most double wall tents.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Pack in vestibule" IMAGE CAPTION
      = "Pack in vestibule">>
      I continued to enjoy the amount of interior space provided in the
      tent. I found it just the right combination of sleeping space, with
      room for my boots, extra gear like a jacket, and most importantly my
      dog on her blanket next to me. I also continued to use the vestibule
      to store my pack. It was really convenient to have my pack under full
      cover, placing it in the right half of the vestibule as one looks at
      the tent. The pack fit in there well enough so that I had
      unrestricted access in and out of the tent via the other half of the
      vestibule.

      I continued to do well using the thin, titanium pegs that come with
      the tent. I was able to make them work in soft soil and most of the
      time in the rock ground I encountered. During my trips I would bring
      along a few full sized aluminum pegs as insurance. On one outing I
      had to use a couple of my "insurance" pegs because the ground
      contained large rocks that were too much for these small pegs. It was
      actually quite difficult to get the full size aluminum pegs into the
      ground at this location.

      I was slightly frustrated at times when grabbing for the zipper
      pulls. The pulls do not have any cord or webbing to make them easy to
      grab. This is in keeping with the minimal intent of this tent,
      cutting weight where ever possible. I just found these small, metal
      zipper pulls hard to use when my hands were cold or when I was
      wearing gloves.

      The other thing that frustrated me about the tent was securing the
      rain fly door in the open position. It just seemed to be a long
      reach that was needed to secure the toggle on the door flap to the
      loop on the outside, center of the tent body. During my use this
      season I could never get the hang of quickly and easily reaching in
      and securing the toggle. I would try with one hand and invariable I
      would have to crawl part way under the rain fly and use two hands to
      do this. I think it is a combination of the long reach plus the small
      toggle and loop that makes this such a challenge for me. This was
      definitely not something I could do with gloves on, even when using
      two hands. Once the flap was secured with the toggle, a small hook
      and loop fastener gave the rain fly an extra tuck out of the way that
      made for easy access to the tent.

      I still missed not having any gear loops or gear pockets. This tent
      is purposely built to have minimal weight so I can appreciate these
      are not a tent feature. I just miss them as a little creature comfort
      I've become accustomed to in my other tents.

      SUMMARY

      I have been very pleased with the Laser Competition Tent. It is
      simple to set up and I've gotten very good at erecting it quickly,
      with minimal fine tuning needed. Best of all I love all the room it
      provides both inside the tent and in the vestibule. To have all this
      room in such a light weight package that packs down so small makes
      this my favorite tent. The tent materials have all held up well so I
      anticipate getting a lot of use out of this tent on many future
      outing.

      Likes: Light weight, ample room, easy of set up

      Dislikes: Would like to have gear pockets (even though it adds a
      little weight to the tent), tent pegs are a little too light to be
      used reliably in all conditions that I encounter.

      This concludes my Long Term Report. I would like to thank
      BackpackGearTest.org and Terra Nova for giving me the opportunity to
      test this tent.
      <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "Final night of testing" IMAGE CAPTION
      = "Final night of testing">>

      CONTINUED USE

      I will continue to use the Laser Competition as my 3-season tent.
      It's light weight and compact size make it a good fit in my back
      pack. I also like the room and provides, both in the tent and the
      vestibule. Now that the test is complete I will be adding some cord
      loops to the zipper pulls to make them easier to grip, I might
      consider stitching in a couple mesh gear pockets and, or some gear
      loops to the inside of the tent. So far I have learned to live
      without them, but they are a nice creature comfort that will add
      minimal additional weight to the tent.

      This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
      Copyright 2008. All rights reserved.
    • Thomas Vickers
      These are Thomas Vickers official monitor edites of Tom Callahan s Terra Nova Laser Competition Tent LTR EDIT = must do Edit = think about it, but do
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 25, 2008
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        These are Thomas Vickers' official monitor edites of Tom Callahan's Terra
        Nova Laser Competition Tent LTR


        EDIT = must do
        Edit = think about it, but do something
        Comment = think about

        the second night they got up to around 15 mph (24 km/hr) at times.

        EDIT: I think it is kph vs km/hr

        ******************************************

        I did not have any issue with the nylon stretching, all seams and peg loops
        stayed in tact.

        EDIT: in tact = intact

        ***********************
        Also, I got to thinking that since the rain fly stays attached to the tent,
        this really helps for make for a quick and easy set up.

        Edit: the 'helps for make for a' reads strangely to me. Is a word missing?

        **********************
        I also continued to use the vestibule to store my pack. It was really
        convenient to have my pack under full cover, placing it in the right half of
        the vestibule as one looks at the tent.

        Comment: I might replace "as one looks' with "as I look"

        ****************************
        I just found these small, metal zipper pulls hard to use when my hands were
        cold or when I was wearing gloves.

        Edit: I think the comma (small,) is unnecessary.
        ******************************
        The tent materials have all held up well so I anticipate getting a lot of
        use out of this tent on many future outing.

        EDIT: outing = outings.

        ************************************

        It's light weight and compact size make it a good fit in my back pack.

        EDIT: my spellchecker says "Its"

        *********************
      • tcallahanbgt
        Turns out we were both wrong on kilometers per hour. I did some Googling around and found out I should have used km/h. These two sites were helpful and I m
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 1, 2008
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          Turns out we were both wrong on kilometers per hour. I did some
          Googling around and found out I should have used km/h. These two
          sites were helpful and I'm going to save them for future reference.

          http://www.bipm.org/en/home/
          http://lamar.colostate.edu/~hillger/correct.htm

          Thanks for the edits. Changes made. Report uploaded this morning.

          Tom


          --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Vickers"
          <redroach@...> wrote:
          >
          > These are Thomas Vickers' official monitor edites of Tom Callahan's
          Terra Nova Laser Competition Tent LTR
          >
          >
          > EDIT = must do
          > Edit = think about it, but do something
          > Comment = think about
          >
          > the second night they got up to around 15 mph (24 km/hr) at times.
          >
          > EDIT: I think it is kph vs km/hr
          >
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