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FR - CiloGear 40B Alpine Day Pack - Allnutt

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  • Rick Allnutt
    The CiloGear pack continues to do very well. It is the most adaptable pack I have ever used. HTML is here:
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 1, 2008
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      The CiloGear pack continues to do very well. It is the most adaptable
      pack I have ever used.

      HTML is here:
      <
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Allnutt%20-%20CiloGear%2040%20B%20%20Alpine%20Day%20Pack/
      >
      or
      http://snipurl.com/3luvu

      Text Version:

      FIELD REPORT
      1 September 2008

      FIELD LOCATIONS AND CONDITIONS

      July 19, 2008 – Overnight in Government Canyon State Natural Area, near
      my home in Helotes, TX, altitude about 1000 ft (300 m). The walk into
      this site was a 4 mi (6 km) trek on rocky but mostly level ground.
      Afternoon high was 98 F (37 C) and overnight low about 72F (22 C). I
      used the pack without its frame sheet and stiffener, and without the
      lid. Bright moon beginning after I went to bed. Hammock hanging, nice
      quiet night.
      July 5, 2008 – Trip to my old stomping grounds in Beavercreek Ohio,
      altitude about 1000 ft (300 m). Most of the trip was to visit friends
      and family, but it included an outdoors overnight. Afternoon high was 90
      F (32 C) and overnight low was about 60 F (20 C). Hammock hanging with
      deer snorting all night long near the campsite. I had to use a closed
      cell pad for the first time in months because the temperature got down
      pretty cool. A light quilt was still enough top insulation. On this
      trip, I used the pack system as my luggage for a 5 day trip. I left the
      frame sheet and hip belt in Texas. I used the lid as a left hip bag by
      using one of the tie down straps as a belt.

      June 28, 2008 – Overnight in Government Canyon SNA. Afternoon high was
      100 F (38 C) and the overnight low about 77 F (25 C). Lots of coyote
      yipping in the middle of the night. Clear night skies, no rain. After
      soaking the back of the pack from sweating in the heat, I washed the
      pack on a gentle cycle in the washing machine.

      June 19-21, 2008 – Trip to Fort Davis, TX and Carlsbad, NM. Day hiking
      in the state park at Fort Davis and between there and the national
      monument. Total of about 8 miles of day hiking with temperature in the
      mid 90s F (near 35 C). Altitude was about 4000 ft (1200 m). On 21 June,
      we hiked about 4 mi (6 km) in Carlsbad Caverns, including a descent of
      800 ft (250 m). The CiloGear pack was carried the entire time.
      In addition to the 3 nights above, I also used the pack while day hiking
      in Government Canyon an additional 5 times on walks that ranged from 3-8
      mi (5-13 km). I also used the pack as carry-on luggage for three trips
      on airplanes.

      PERFORMANCE IN THE FIELD
      The CiloGear pack continues to amaze me in its ability to morph into an
      ideal pack for multiple uses. It has been handy as a backpack for
      multi-day trips, day hiking, and even luggage for business trips.

      I keep my hiking gear in a dedicated closet. When I am about to take a
      walk or pack for an overnight trip, I reach into that closet for the
      gear that I will need. I decide what kind a cooking equipment, water
      bottles, sleeping gear, and shelter I will need for the conditions. The
      CiloGear pack has taken on the same sort of adaptability that I find in
      my gear closet. I think about the trip ahead and begin putting together
      the components that will be most useful for the conditions. I ask myself
      if I will need a frame sheet for heavy loads, or if a foam pad will be
      enough. Will the load require a hip belt? Will I need the lid
      compartment on the pack or on my hip? How much compression will I need
      to keep the gear near my center of gravity?

      The CiloGear pack allows me to completely customize the pack I will
      carry based on the answers to those questions. To take the hip belt off
      the pack is a 1 minute operation. To fit the pack's lid compartment to
      be carried on a hip takes just a few seconds. Removing or installing the
      frame sheet likewise can be accomplished in a flash.

      In the trips I have now taken, my first (slightly negative) reaction to
      the shoulder straps has NOT been confirmed. Initially, I thought they
      were stiff enough to cause me difficulty. However, the straps have
      turned out to be very comfortable to me. Under light loads they are most
      comfortable to me without the sternum strap fastened. Under heavy loads,
      the pack is more comfortable with the sternum strap snapped and with the
      hip belt used to carry about 1/2 to 2/3 of the pack's weight. I don't
      know if my change in opinion has been because they became "broken in" or
      if it was part of a learning curve on my part.

      I wondered whether the frame sheet's aluminum bar might be a problem in
      using the pack for carry-on luggage. On one trip, I carried the pack
      with that bar and the nice folks at both airports that I needed to go
      through had no questions about that bar when it went through the X-ray
      scanner.

      I have discovered a very handy use for the lid, when it is not attached
      to the top of the pack. Using one of the straps with a clip, I have
      found that this makes a great hip pack. I have used it most often when
      traveling by air - to carry a GPS, book, and travel documents. However,
      I can imagine it as a great tool for town trips for shopping for a
      couple day's of food on the Appalachian Trail. In carrying the lid on
      my hip, I orient the zippers vertically, so that the entire opening is
      easy to see from the side. If I had a lot to carry, I might put the
      zipper at the top, though I have not yet carried it for any length of
      time in that position.

      In my initial summary I said that I really wanted a way to carry a water
      bottle. The good news is that CiloGear has developed a "wand pocket"
      that works very well for carrying a water bottle. It can be attached to
      the side of the pack on either side. The version I have is a prototype,
      so I have not reported on the weight or cost of that device. However, as
      of this date, wand pockets of three different sizes are available on the
      CiloGear website under "accessories".

      SUMMARY

      Things I like thus far:
      Same as I listed at the end of the initial report. Adaptability is the
      king when I use this pack.

      Things I don't like:

      Nothing at all. Both questions I had at the beginning have been
      answered. The shoulder straps have turned out to be very comfortable.
      And now I have a place to carry water.

      Come back in November to see how I fare in the early fall. Hopefully, I
      will have some good stories from carrying heavier loads of water in the
      dry western part of Texas.
    • Coy
      Hi Rick, nice work! I will admite I got very hot just reading your report...Hot as in wow, hiking in 100 F heat!!! BTW, sorry I missed the report earlier and
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 7, 2008
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        Hi Rick, nice work! I will admite I got very hot just reading your
        report...Hot as in wow, hiking in 100 F heat!!! BTW, sorry I missed
        the report earlier and edited a later report first but no harm no
        foul. Html and pics are great. Just a comment and 1 edit for you to
        fix.


        --- In backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com, Rick Allnutt <rick@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > The CiloGear pack continues to do very well. It is the most
        adaptable
        > pack I have ever used.
        >
        > HTML is here:
        > <
        > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Allnutt%20-%
        20CiloGear%2040%20B%20%20Alpine%20Day%20Pack/
        > >
        > or
        > http://snipurl.com/3luvu
        >
        > Text Version:

        I decide what kind a cooking equipment, water bottles, sleeping
        gear, and shelter I will need for the conditions.

        Edit: a shoud be of

        Under light loads they are most
        > comfortable to me without the sternum strap fastened. Under heavy
        loads,
        > the pack is more comfortable with the sternum strap snapped and
        with the
        > hip belt used to carry about 1/2 to 2/3 of the pack's weight.

        Comment: I didn't see a weight of your heaviest load. I know you
        pack light but with water it can get heavy fast. Might want to give
        an aproximate or hold off till LTR but right here seemed like a
        logical place to include it.
      • Rick Allnutt
        Thanks for your comments Coy. Yep, I am going to hold on the weight issue until I take a several day hike in the Gilla Wilderness mid month. That should get
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 8, 2008
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          Thanks for your comments Coy. Yep, I am going to hold on the weight
          issue until I take a several day hike in the Gilla Wilderness mid month.
          That should get some heavier weights on my back with water that I will
          need to carry.

          Rick

          Coy wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hi Rick, nice work! I will admite I got very hot just reading your
          > report...Hot as in wow, hiking in 100 F heat!!! BTW, sorry I missed
          > the report earlier and edited a later report first but no harm no
          > foul. Html and pics are great. Just a comment and 1 edit for you to
          > fix.
          >
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