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FR-REI Venturi Daypack- Ralph Ditton

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  • Ralph Ditton
    Hello Mike, Here is my FR on the REI Venturi Daypack. Text version below and the link to the test folder is here: http://tinyurl.com/5vhr4a Cheers Ralph DATE:
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 2008
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      Hello Mike,

      Here is my FR on the REI Venturi Daypack.

      Text version below and the link to the test folder is here:

      http://tinyurl.com/5vhr4a



      Cheers

      Ralph



      DATE: 31st August, 2008

      FIELD REPORT



      My first field test took place on the Eagle View Trail in the John

      Forrest National Park. The distance walked overall was 16 km (10 mi) as

      there was a short section leading to the start of the walk not shown on

      the cross section below. The weather was overcast with occasional rain.

      The temperature during the walk ranged from 8 C to 15 C (46 F to 59 F).

      Elevations fluctuated between 90 m to 280 m (295 ft to 919 ft). It was

      quite hilly.



      Eagle View Trail



      As I was the Walk's Leader, I had extra gear in the day pack such as a

      large First Aid Kit, GPS, mobile phone, extra water for people in the

      group who might run out (one did) and extra toilet paper and trowel. All

      up, the weight of the pack plus all of my food and gear, on my back was

      11 kg (24.25 lb).



      This was a good first up test, heavy weight and rain with slippery rocks

      and mud on the track.

      When I first put the pack on at home to weigh myself I felt the base of

      the hipbelt stick into the small of my back where the wedge is located

      behind the hip belt. I thought to myself that this is going to be

      interesting.



      My group started at the 18 point (see above) and we went in an

      anti-clock wise direction so I hit a steep climb almost immediately.

      (Point 15). This took my mind off the pack and the feeling in the small

      of my back. During the whole trip I was not aware of the sensation at

      all. Perhaps the sponge inside the wedge softened up from my body heat,

      who knows, but the pack was comfortable to wear.

      There were frequent stops for photo shoots and I had my camera in the

      horizontal pocket above the vertical front pocket. I had no difficulty

      in opening and closing this pocket. My rain poncho was in the front

      pocket and I took it out a number of times when the rain started up.

      The welded, water-repellent zipper worked well and no moisture gained

      entry through it.



      I used my water bladder in the hydration sleeve with the bladder hanging

      off the top loop by using the hook on the water bladder. This took the

      pressure off the base of the hydration sleeve. I managed to get the hose

      through the exit port but it is a very tight fit and I had to take the

      cap off the bite end piece the get it through the hole.



      I used the pockets on the hip belt for trail nibblies that were in clip

      lock bags as the sides are mesh and got wet from the rain and wet

      vegetation that I pushed through as it was overgrown over the track.



      The mesh back panel worked very well. At no stage did my shirt feel wet

      from perspiration because the pack body was not against my body. I kept

      feeling my back whilst walking to see if it was getting wet. I put my

      hand in between the mesh back panel and my back for a feel. Most impressed.



      I carried a water bottle in one of the side pockets. I found that I had

      to take the pack off to get it out of the pocket and to replace it. When

      I tried to do it whilst wearing the pack, my arm was bent backwards with

      my elbow sticking above the horizontal and my hand just about tucked

      into my arm pit trying to reach for the cap of the water bottle. I was

      not successful and it was an awkward feel in my shoulder joint.



      The top of the floating lid became wet from the rain and wet vegetation

      but the contents inside the pocket did not get damp. When the rain got

      heavy I threw my poncho over the pack as well for protection.



      The base of the pack, not unsurprisingly, got a bit muddy from being

      rested on the wet ground at various stops we did. The dirt cleaned off

      easily at home with a damp sponge and warm water only.



      I found that the shoulder harness worked well and that I was able to

      pull the top of the pack close to my neck by using the top adjusting straps.



      All in all, it was a good day out and I was very happy with the

      performance of the pack. I did not develop any sore spots from wearing

      the pack.



      The next outing was a day walk out of base camp on the Coastal Plain

      Trail. Elevations ranged from 20 m to 60 m (65 ft to 197 ft). The

      temperature during the walk averaged 16 C (61 F). My back did not get

      wet from perspiration at all.

      This time the weight of the pack was around 3 kilos (6.6 lb). I carried

      a map, rain jacket/poncho, camera and water. The terrain underfoot was

      blackish sand that was very loose in parts as it had been churned up by

      Quad bikes. The two children with me ended up putting their water

      bottles in the side pockets of the pack thereby freeing up their hands

      apart from their bag of lollies which they hung onto. The two children's

      water bottles can be seen in the one side pocket facing the camera.



      Wearing

      the pack



      I had no issue with the pack at all. The zips worked well and believe

      me, I had the pack on and off to retrieve my camera many times so that I

      could take photos. The fabric stood up to the scratchy vegetation that

      brushed against it and I noted no damage.

      The only thing was that the base got dirty from the damp sand. It

      cleaned up beautifully when I got home.



      For two weekends, one after the other, I hiked in the Mundaring Weir

      region as the recent rains have filled the creeks and the waterfalls are

      a sight for sore eyes after a few years of below average rainfall.

      The first weekend was wet, on and off. The temperature over the two days

      of walks was on average 9 C (48 F). Elevation fluctuated between 100 m

      to 240 m (328 ft to 787 ft). My walks were of a short duration, some 40

      minutes at a time. Although the pack got wet from the light rain, no

      water entered the pack. I did not use a pack cover.



      The weight averaged around 4 kg (9 lb). 2 kg (4.5 lb) of that was water.

      Perth Bushwalking Club policy is that 2 litres (2 quart) of water must

      be carried at the start of a club walk. I carried the water in a flexi

      flask container that sat in a side pocket on the pack.



      The subsequent walk in the above area was a 16 km (10 mi) circuit walk

      on track. The weather was fine with temperatures during the walk

      averaging 12 C (54 F). We walked further than the published walk as we

      wanted to look at further running creeks and waterfalls. My pack weight

      was around 7 kg (15 lb) as I carried a jacket for when we stopped for a

      rest and meal break and a poncho in case it rained.

      Below is a cross section of most of the walk.





      cross section of walk



      We did finish up back at the Mundaring Weir Hotel to discuss the days walk.



      When I got home and started to unpack the day pack I noticed that the

      black elastic cover for the hydration hose outlet had torn part of the

      way from the pack. I put this down to the very tight fit in trying to

      feed the mouthpiece through the gap and stretch past the elastic. Below

      is a photo of the damage.



      torn elastic



      The pack was very comfortable to wear over such undulating ground and my

      back did not get wet from perspiration due to the mesh resting against

      my back from the pack. I normally sweat on my back when a backpack is up

      against my back.



      Summary

      During the testing period I have used the day pack a total of four times

      whilst undertaking lengthy day walks in undulating country.



      I especially like the fact that my back does not get wet from

      perspiration as per the norm with other packs that I have used. I have

      even had comments from other club members who spotted the mesh back as

      to how impressed they were with the set up and wished that they had

      something similar.



      I am at the limit of the torso fit of 48.5 cm (19 in) as stipulated by

      the manufacturer for the medium size, and I have found that the pack is

      very comfortable to wear. I have had no issues with aching between my

      shoulder blades, sore shoulders or hips.



      The two front pockets have become my gear organizers for the small items

      that I want to get to in a hurry such as a camera, insect repellent,

      rain poncho, pack cover, GPS and trail nibblies. There are a few other

      odds and ends that end up there also.



      The main compartment is for my food, thermos, jacket, toiletries, first

      aid kit, water bladder and rubbish bag.



      The top pocket is used for my map and track notes and the underside

      pocket mainly for my little 1 litre ultra-sil stuff sack that I carry my

      money in.



      With regards to the two zip pockets on the hip belt, I tend to use just

      one for the storage of my compass which is close at hand when I need it.



      To date I have not noticed any seams becoming undone, or any loose

      stitching. The pack fabric is standing up to the scratchy bush that I

      traverse. The only issue is what I have mentioned above about the

      elastic panel in front of the hydration hose port starting to tear away.



      The Bonzer and Rhubarb points are still the same as in the Initial

      Report, more so with the exit port for the hydration hose due to the

      damage being suffered by the elastic covering.



      This concludes my Field Report. The Long -Term Report should be

      completed by the 28th October, 2008. Please check back then for further

      information.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mike C.
      Ralph, Another beautiful report. Below are your edits in the usual form (EDIT=Change; Edit=change something; Comment=just that). Actually, just one EDIT and
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2008
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        Ralph,

        Another beautiful report. Below are your edits in the usual form
        (EDIT=Change; Edit=change something; Comment=just that). Actually,
        just one EDIT and a few comments. I find your descriptions quite
        vivid, and though I wasn't sure how I felt about the terrain
        profiles, after reading the report I think they definitely help the
        reader gain a better impression of the test conditions.

        Also, if you could hyperlink your Field Report date at the very
        beginning to the field report section, that would be great.

        Looking forward to your LTR!

        Mike C.


        <SNIP>

        My group started at the 18 point (see above) and we went in an anti-
        clock wise direction so I hit a steep climb almost immediately.
        (Point 15).

        EDIT: Deleting the period after immediately will help clarify what
        the parenthetical (Point 15) is referring to. I wasn't sure if it
        was a conclusion to this sentence, or an introduction to the next.

        And, since I'm having a buy one EDIT, get a Comment free sale, on the
        same sentence:

        Comment: I've never seen clockwise as two words . . . I'm assuming
        this is local usage, in which case it's fine, but thought I'd point
        it out in case it was a typo.

        <SNIP>

        The mesh back panel worked very well. At no stage did my shirt feel
        wet from perspiration because the pack body was not against my body.
        I kept feeling my back whilst walking to see if it was getting wet. I
        put my hand in between the mesh back panel and my back for a feel.
        Most impressed.

        I carried a water bottle in one of the side pockets. I found that I
        had to take the pack off to get it out of the pocket and to replace
        it. When I tried to do it whilst wearing the pack, my arm was bent
        backwards with my elbow sticking above the horizontal and my hand
        just about tucked into my arm pit trying to reach for the cap of the
        water bottle.

        Comment: Ouch.

        <SNIP>

        This time the weight of the pack was around 3 kilos (6.6 lb). I
        carried a map, rain jacket/poncho, camera and water. The terrain
        underfoot was blackish sand that was very loose in parts as it had
        been churned up by Quad bikes. The two children with me ended up
        putting their water bottles in the side pockets of the pack thereby
        freeing up their hands apart from their bag of lollies which they
        hung onto.

        Comment: Sounds a lot like something my kids would do!

        <END>
      • Mike C.
        Corrected Subject Line. Original post below: Ralph, Another beautiful report. Below are your edits in the usual form (EDIT=Change; Edit=change something;
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 1, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Corrected Subject Line. Original post below:

          Ralph,

          Another beautiful report. Below are your edits in the usual form
          (EDIT=Change; Edit=change something; Comment=just that). Actually,
          just one EDIT and a few comments. I find your descriptions quite
          vivid, and though I wasn't sure how I felt about the terrain
          profiles, after reading the report I think they definitely help the
          reader gain a better impression of the test conditions.

          Also, if you could hyperlink your Field Report date at the very
          beginning to the field report section, that would be great.

          Looking forward to your LTR!

          Mike C.


          <SNIP>

          My group started at the 18 point (see above) and we went in an anti-
          clock wise direction so I hit a steep climb almost immediately.
          (Point 15).

          EDIT: Deleting the period after immediately will help clarify what
          the parenthetical (Point 15) is referring to. I wasn't sure if it
          was a conclusion to this sentence, or an introduction to the next.

          And, since I'm having a buy one EDIT, get a Comment free sale, on the
          same sentence:

          Comment: I've never seen clockwise as two words . . . I'm assuming
          this is local usage, in which case it's fine, but thought I'd point
          it out in case it was a typo.

          <SNIP>

          The mesh back panel worked very well. At no stage did my shirt feel
          wet from perspiration because the pack body was not against my body.
          I kept feeling my back whilst walking to see if it was getting wet. I
          put my hand in between the mesh back panel and my back for a feel.
          Most impressed.

          I carried a water bottle in one of the side pockets. I found that I
          had to take the pack off to get it out of the pocket and to replace
          it. When I tried to do it whilst wearing the pack, my arm was bent
          backwards with my elbow sticking above the horizontal and my hand
          just about tucked into my arm pit trying to reach for the cap of the
          water bottle.

          Comment: Ouch.

          <SNIP>

          This time the weight of the pack was around 3 kilos (6.6 lb). I
          carried a map, rain jacket/poncho, camera and water. The terrain
          underfoot was blackish sand that was very loose in parts as it had
          been churned up by Quad bikes. The two children with me ended up
          putting their water bottles in the side pockets of the pack thereby
          freeing up their hands apart from their bag of lollies which they
          hung onto.

          Comment: Sounds a lot like something my kids would do!

          <END>
        • Ralph Ditton
          Thanks for your kind words Mike. As far as I know we do not have to hyperlink the Field Report or LTR. Jet in an e-mail to the group as at the 8th January,
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 2, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks for your kind words Mike.

            As far as I know we do not have to hyperlink the Field Report or LTR.

            Jet in an e-mail to the group as at the 8th January, 2008 stated in point 3)
            that the title or dates at the top do NOT need to be clickable (although
            it's kind of nice).



            In fact I have never done it as I do not know how to do it using NVU.



            I have attended to the other points raised.

            I fixed up "clockwise". My blue.



            Kids are the same the world over when it comes to lollies (you call them
            candy I think). No way are they going to part with them.



            Cheers



            Ralph



            _____

            From: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mike C.
            Sent: Tuesday, 2 September 2008 11:15 AM
            To: backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [backpackgeartesters] EDIT: FR-REI Venturi Daypack- Ralph Ditton



            Corrected Subject Line. Original post below:

            Ralph,

            Another beautiful report. Below are your edits in the usual form
            (EDIT=Change; Edit=change something; Comment=just that). Actually,
            just one EDIT and a few comments. I find your descriptions quite
            vivid, and though I wasn't sure how I felt about the terrain
            profiles, after reading the report I think they definitely help the
            reader gain a better impression of the test conditions.

            Also, if you could hyperlink your Field Report date at the very
            beginning to the field report section, that would be great.

            Looking forward to your LTR!

            Mike C.

            <SNIP>

            My group started at the 18 point (see above) and we went in an anti-
            clock wise direction so I hit a steep climb almost immediately.
            (Point 15).

            EDIT: Deleting the period after immediately will help clarify what
            the parenthetical (Point 15) is referring to. I wasn't sure if it
            was a conclusion to this sentence, or an introduction to the next.

            And, since I'm having a buy one EDIT, get a Comment free sale, on the
            same sentence:

            Comment: I've never seen clockwise as two words . . . I'm assuming
            this is local usage, in which case it's fine, but thought I'd point
            it out in case it was a typo.

            <SNIP>

            The mesh back panel worked very well. At no stage did my shirt feel
            wet from perspiration because the pack body was not against my body.
            I kept feeling my back whilst walking to see if it was getting wet. I
            put my hand in between the mesh back panel and my back for a feel.
            Most impressed.

            I carried a water bottle in one of the side pockets. I found that I
            had to take the pack off to get it out of the pocket and to replace
            it. When I tried to do it whilst wearing the pack, my arm was bent
            backwards with my elbow sticking above the horizontal and my hand
            just about tucked into my arm pit trying to reach for the cap of the
            water bottle.

            Comment: Ouch.

            <SNIP>

            This time the weight of the pack was around 3 kilos (6.6 lb). I
            carried a map, rain jacket/poncho, camera and water. The terrain
            underfoot was blackish sand that was very loose in parts as it had
            been churned up by Quad bikes. The two children with me ended up
            putting their water bottles in the side pockets of the pack thereby
            freeing up their hands apart from their bag of lollies which they
            hung onto.

            Comment: Sounds a lot like something my kids would do!

            <END>





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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